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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
MONSTERS OF THE SEA SERPENT: PARASITES OF AN OARFISH, REGALECUS RUSSELLII.
J. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2014
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Abstract Examination of a small portion of the viscera of an oarfish recovered from Santa Catalina Island, southern California, revealed numerous tetraphyllidean tapeworm plerocercoids, Clistobothrium cf. montaukensis; 2 juvenile nematodes, Contracaecum sp.; and a fragment of an adult acanthocephalan, family Arhythmacanthidae. This suggests that the fish was relatively heavily parasitized. The presence of larval and juvenile worms suggests that oarfish are preyed upon by deep-swimming predators such as the shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, known to be a definitive host for the adult tapeworm, and also by diving mammals such as sperm whales, hosts of Contracaecum spp. nematodes.
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Telomere length and mortality following a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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Telomeres are essential for the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Telomere shortening leads to genomic instability, which is hypothesized to play a role in cancer development and prognosis. No studies to date have evaluated the prognostic significance of telomere length for ovarian cancer.
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Elimination of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases tolerance to trichothecenes.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2014
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Trichothecene mycotoxins are natural contaminants of small grain cereals and are encountered in the environment, posing a worldwide threat to human and animal health. Their mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood, and little is known about cellular protection mechanisms against trichothecenes. We previously identified inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a novel mechanism for trichothecene-induced cell death. To identify cellular functions involved in trichothecene resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to nonlethal concentrations of trichothecin (Tcin) and identified 121 strains exhibiting higher sensitivity than the parental strain. The largest group of sensitive strains had significantly higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels relative to the parental strain. A dose-dependent increase in ROS levels was observed in the parental strain treated with different trichothecenes, but not in a petite version of the parental strain or in the presence of a mitochondrial membrane uncoupler, indicating that mitochondria are the main site of ROS production due to toxin exposure. Cytotoxicity of trichothecenes was alleviated after treatment of the parental strain and highly sensitive mutants with antioxidants, suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to trichothecene sensitivity. Cotreatment with rapamycin and trichothecenes reduced ROS levels and cytotoxicity in the parental strain relative to the trichothecene treatment alone, but not in mitophagy deficient mutants, suggesting that elimination of trichothecene-damaged mitochondria by mitophagy improves cell survival. These results reveal that increased mitophagy is a cellular protection mechanism against trichothecene-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and a potential target for trichothecene resistance.
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0409?The North American Pooled Project (NAPP): Pooled analyses of case-control studies of pesticides and agricultural exposures, lymphohematopoietic cancers and sarcoma.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Previous studies have noted associations between specific pesticides and multiple cancer types. However, assessments for many pesticides have been limited by small numbers of exposed cases. To address this, we established the North American Pooled Project (NAPP), a collaborative effort to evaluate the relationship of pesticide and agricultural exposures to risks of lymphohematopoietic cancers and sarcoma.
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Duodenal CCK cells from male mice express multiple hormones including ghrelin.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2014
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Enteroendocrine (EEC) cells have a pivotal role in intestinal nutrient sensing and release hormones that orchestrate food digestion and regulate appetite. EEC cells are found scattered throughout the intestine and have typically been classified based on the primary hormone they contain. I cells represent a subset of EEC cells that secrete cholecystokinin (CCK) and are mainly localized to the duodenum. Recent studies have shown that I cells express mRNAs encoding several gut hormones. In this study, we investigated the hormonal profile of murine fluorescence-activated cell sorting-sorted duodenal I cells using semiquantitative RT-PCR, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and immunostaining methods. We report that I cells are enriched in mRNA transcripts encoding CCK and also other key gut hormones, including neurotensin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), secretin, peptide YY, proglucagon, and ghrelin (Ghrl). Furthermore, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-purified I cells and immunostaining confirmed the presence of these gut hormones in duodenal I cells. Immunostaining highlighted that subsets of I cells in both crypts and villi coexpress differential amounts of CCK, Ghrl, GIP, or peptide YY, indicating that a proportion of I cells contain several hormones during maturation and when fully differentiated. Our results reveal that although I cells express several key gut hormones, including GIP or proglucagon, and thus have a considerable overlap with classically defined K and L cells, approximately half express Ghrl, suggesting a potentially important subset of duodenal EEC cells that require further consideration.
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Consensus Best Practice pathway of the UK Scleroderma Study Group: gastrointestinal manifestations of systemic sclerosis.
Clin. Exp. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder, which can be progressive with multisystem involvement. Guidance on the management of complications is based on a limited data set and practice amongst clinicians can vary. The UK Scleroderma study group set up several working groups to agree some consensus pathways for the management of specific complications. Approximately nine out of ten patients with systemic sclerosis will have involvement of the gastrointestinal system and in this review article we explore the management of these complications in a symptom-based approach. The algorithms are a useful tool for clinicians, which we hope, will be a point of reference and highlight the need for further research in these areas.
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Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2014
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In a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and the following factors: (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes.
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Production of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cultured in extract from waste product alga, Ulva lactuca.
Biotechnol. Prog.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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This study examined the potential for waste product alga, Ulva lactuca, to serve as a media component for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. To facilitate this investigation, U. lactuca harvested from Jamaica Bay was dried, and nutrients acid extracted for use as a growth media. The E. coli cell line BL21(DE3) was used to assess the effects on growth and production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP). This study showed that media composed of acid extracts without further nutrient addition maintained E. coli growth and recombinant protein production. Extracts made from dried algae lots less than six-months-old were able to produce two-fold more GFP protein than traditional Lysogeny Broth media.
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Short-term dietary supplementation with fructose accelerates gastric emptying of a fructose but not a glucose solution.
Nutrition
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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Short-term dietary glucose supplementation has been shown to accelerate the gastric emptying rate of both glucose and fructose solutions. The aim of this study was to examine gastric emptying rate responses to monosaccharide ingestion following short-term dietary fructose supplementation.
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Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2014
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Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.-Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G., Kinoshita, T., Kinsella, T. M. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.
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Association between IHC and MSI testing to identify mismatch repair-deficient patients with ovarian cancer.
Genet Test Mol Biomarkers
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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In epithelial ovarian cancer, concordance between results of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) testing has not been demonstrated. This study evaluated the association of MSI-high (MSI-H) status with loss of expression (LoE) of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins on IHC and assessed for potential factors affecting the strength of the association.
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Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD.
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Mapping glucose-mediated gut-to-brain signalling pathways in humans.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2014
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Previous fMRI studies have demonstrated that glucose decreases the hypothalamic BOLD response in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying the CNS response to glucose have not been defined. We recently demonstrated that the slowing of gastric emptying by glucose is dependent on activation of the gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK1) receptor. Using physiological functional magnetic resonance imaging this study aimed to determine the whole brain response to glucose, and whether CCK plays a central role.
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Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk.
Linda E Kelemen, Kathryn L Terry, Marc T Goodman, Penelope M Webb, Elisa V Bandera, Valerie McGuire, Mary Anne Rossing, Qinggang Wang, Ed Dicks, Jonathan P Tyrer, Honglin Song, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Joanna Plisiecka-Halasa, Agnieszka Timorek, Usha Menon, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Steven A Narod, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Rosalind Glasspool, James Paul, Karen Carty, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Cezary Cybulski, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Daniel W Cramer, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Graham G Giles, Melissa C Southey, Fiona Bruinsma, Susanne K Kjaer, Estrid Høgdall, Allan Jensen, Claus K Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Svend-Aage Engelholm, Florian Heitz, Andreas du Bois, Philipp Harter, Ira Schwaab, Ralf Bützow, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Arto Leminen, Pamela J Thompson, Galina Lurie, Lynne R Wilkens, Diether Lambrechts, Els Van Nieuwenhuysen, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Jonathan Beesley, , Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Jennifer A Doherty, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Daniel Stram, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Ingo B Runnebaum, Natalia Bogdanova, Natalia Antonenkova, Kunle Odunsi, Robert P Edwards, Joseph L Kelley, Francesmary Modugno, Roberta B Ness, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Sandra Orsulic, Brooke L Fridley, Robert A Vierkant, Julie M Cunningham, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Dong Liang, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Edwin S Iversen, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth M Poole, Helga B Salvesen, Camilla Krakstad, Line Bjorge, Ingvild L Tangen, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie Bean, Melissa Kellar, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ian G Campbell, Diana Eccles, Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Catherine M Phelan, Kirsten B Moysich, Ellen L Goode, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Paul D P Pharoah, Thomas A Sellers, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le.
Mol Nutr Food Res
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake.
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Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and lung cancer by histological type: a pooled analysis of the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO).
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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While the association between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer risk is well established, few studies with sufficient power have examined the association by histological type. In this study, we evaluated the secondhand smoke-lung cancer relationship by histological type based on pooled data from 18 case-control studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), including 2,504 cases and 7,276 control who were never smokers and 10,184 cases and 7,176 controls who were ever smokers. We used multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and study. Among never smokers, the odds ratios (OR) comparing those ever exposed to secondhand smoke with those never exposed were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.17-1.45) for all histological types combined, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10-1.44) for adenocarcinoma, 1.41 (95% CI: 0.99-1.99) for squamous cell carcinoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 0.89-2.45) for large cell lung cancer, and 3.09 (95% CI: 1.62-5.89) for small cell lung cancer. The estimated association with secondhand smoke exposure was greater for small cell lung cancer than for nonsmall cell lung cancers (OR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.11-4.04). This analysis is the largest to date investigating the relation between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer. Our study provides more precise estimates of the impact of secondhand smoke on the major histological types of lung cancer, indicates the association with secondhand smoke is stronger for small cell lung cancer than for the other histological types, and suggests the importance of intervention against exposure to secondhand smoke in lung cancer prevention.
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Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analyzed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and the joint effects of occupational carcinogens. For men ever employed as bricklayers we estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for study center, age, lifetime smoking history and employment in occupations with exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens. Among 15,608 cases and 18,531 controls, there were 695 cases and 469 controls who had ever worked as bricklayers (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.68). In studies using population controls the OR was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.32-1.81, 540/349 cases/controls), while it was 1.24 (95% CI: 0.93-1.64, 155/120 cases/controls) in hospital-based studies. There was a clear positive trend with length of employment (p?
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Brief report: Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells are an effective cell source for therapeutic liver repopulation.
Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Parthenogenesis is the development of an oocyte without fertilization. Mammalian parthenogenetic (PG) embryos are not viable, but can develop into blastocysts from which embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been derived in mouse and human. PG ESCs are frequently homozygous for alleles encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. MHC homozygosity permits much more efficient immune matching than MHC heterozygosity found in conventional ESCs, making PG ESCs a promising cell source for cell therapies requiring no or little immune suppression. However, findings of restricted differentiation and proliferation of PG cells in developmental chimeras have cast doubt on the potential of PG ESC derivatives for organ regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we determined whether PG ESC derivatives are effective in rescuing mice with lethal liver failure due to deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah). In developmental chimeras generated by injecting wild-type PG ESCs into Fah-deficient blastocysts, PG ESCs differentiated into hepatocytes that could repopulate the liver, provide normal liver function, and facilitate long-term survival of adult mice. Moreover, after transplantation into adult Fah-deficient mice, PG ESC-derived hepatocytes efficiently engrafted and proliferated, leading to high-level liver repopulation. Our results show that--despite the absence of a paternal genome--PG ESCs can form therapeutically effective hepatocytes.
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Noninvasive imaging of in vivo MuRF1 expression during muscle atrophy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Numerous human diseases can lead to atrophy of skeletal muscle, and loss of this tissue has been correlated with increased mortality and morbidity rates. Clinically addressing muscle atrophy remains an unmet medical need, and the development of preclinical tools to assist drug discovery and basic research in this effort is important for advancing this goal. In this report, we describe the development of a bioluminescent gene reporter rat, based on the zinc finger nuclease-targeted insertion of a bicistronic luciferase reporter into the 3' untranslated region of a muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligase gene, MuRF1 (Trim63). In longitudinal studies, we noninvasively assess atrophy-related expression of this reporter in three distinct models of muscle loss (sciatic denervation, hindlimb unloading and dexamethasone-treatment) and show that these animals are capable of generating refined detail on in vivo MuRF1 expression with high temporal and anatomical resolution.
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STK31/TDRD8, a germ cell-specific factor, is dispensable for reproduction in mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Tudor domain containing (Tdrd) proteins that are expressed in germ cells are divided into two groups. One group, consisting of TDRD1, TDRKH, TDRD9 and TDRD12, function in piRNA biogenesis and retrotransposon silencing, while the other group including RNF17/TDRD4 and TDRD5-7 are required for spermiogenesis. These Tdrd proteins play distinct roles during male germ cell development. Here, we report the characterization of STK31/TDRD8 in mice. STK31 contains a tudor domain and a serine/threonine kinase domain. We find that STK31 is a cytoplasmic protein in germ cells. STK31 is expressed in embryonic gonocytes of both sexes and postnatal spermatocytes and round spermatids in males. Disruption of the tudor domain and kinase domain of STK31 respectively does not affect fertility in mice. Our data suggest that the function of STK31 may be redundant with other Tdrd proteins in germ cell development.
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Effect Modification of the Association of Cumulative Exposure and Cancer Risk by Intensity of Exposure and Time Since Exposure Cessation: A Flexible Method Applied to Cigarette Smoking and Lung Cancer in the SYNERGY Study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2013
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The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985-2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20-30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive.
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A comparison of exposure assessment approaches: lung cancer and occupational asbestos exposure in a population-based case-control study.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 12-11-2013
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In attempts to overcome the limitations of self-reported data in occupational health research, job-exposure matrices, which assign exposure by occupation, have emerged as an objective approach for assessing occupational exposures. On the basis of a lung cancer case-control study conducted in the Greater Toronto Area, 1997-2002, assessment of occupational exposure to asbestos was compared using self-reports and a general population job-exposure matrix (DOM-JEM).
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A Case-Control Study of Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds and Lung Cancer in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2013
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Few studies have investigated associations between nonoccupational exposure to ambient volatile organic compounds and lung cancer. We conducted a case-control study of 445 incident lung cancers and 948 controls (523 hospital, 425 general population) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, between 1997 and 2002. Participants provided information on several risk factors, including tobacco use, secondhand exposure to cigarette smoke, obesity, and family history of cancer. Exposure to benzene, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen dioxide was estimated using land-use regression models. Exposures were linked to residential addresses to estimate exposure at the time of interview, 10 years before interview, and across past residences (time-weighted average). Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Analyses involving the population-based controls found that an interquartile-range increase in the time-weighted average benzene concentration (0.15 µg/m(3)) across previous residences was associated with lung cancer (odds ratio = 1.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.68). Similarly, an interquartile-range increase in the time-weighted average nitrogen dioxide concentration (4.8 ppb) yielded an odds ratio of 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.12). Our study suggests that long-term exposure to ambient volatile organic compounds and nitrogen dioxide at relatively low concentrations is associated with lung cancer. Further work is needed to evaluate joint relationships between these pollutants, smoking, and lung cancer.
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PPM1D Mutations in Circulating White Blood Cells and the Risk for Ovarian Cancer.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2013
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We compared the frequency of PPM1D mutation in the white blood cells from 1295 ovarian cancer case patients and 834 control subjects. We found a truncating mutation in 20 case patients vs 1 control subject (odds ratio [OR] = 13.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.75 to 97.55; P < .001). The 12-year mortality of the PPM1D-positive case patients was higher than that of the PPM1D-negative case patients (hazard ratio = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.21 to 3.39; P = .007). Three of the 20 PPM1D carrier case patients had a past history of breast cancer compared with 29 of 1129 noncarriers (OR = 6.69; 95% CI = 1.86 to 24.11; P = .007). The lifetime risks for breast or ovarian cancer among female first-degree relatives of PPM1D mutation carriers were not increased compared with that of case patients without mutations. These observations suggest PPM1D mutations in the mosaic state predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer in the absence of a family history of cancer.
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Dietary N-nitroso compounds and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.
Br. J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2013
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Several N-nitroso compounds (NOC) have been shown to be carcinogenic in a variety of laboratory animals, but evidence of their carcinogenicity in humans is lacking. We aimed to examine the association between NOC intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and possible effect modification by vitamins C and E and protein in a large case-control study carried out in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada. A total of 1760 case patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and 2481 population controls were asked to complete a self-administered FFQ to evaluate their dietary intakes 1 year before diagnosis (for cases) or interview (for controls). Adjusted OR and 95 % CI were calculated across the quintiles of NOC (measured by N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)) intake and relevant food items using unconditional logistic regression. NDMA intake was found to be associated with a higher risk of CRC (highest v. lowest quintiles: OR 1·42, 95 % CI 1·03, 1·96; P for trend = 0·005), specifically for rectal carcinoma (OR 1·61, 95 % CI 1·11, 2·35; P for trend = 0·01). CRC risk also increased with the consumption of NDMA-containing meats when the highest tertile was compared with the lowest tertile (OR 1·47, 95 % CI 1·03, 2·10; P for trend = 0·20). There was evidence of effect modification between dietary vitamin E and NDMA. Individuals with high NDMA and low vitamin E intakes had a significantly increased risk than those with both low NDMA and low vitamin E intakes (OR 3·01, 95 % CI 1·43, 6·51; P for interaction = 0·017). The present results support the hypothesis that NOC intake may be positively associated with CRC risk in humans. Vitamin E, which inhibits nitrosation, could modify the effect of NDMA on CRC risk.
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Lung cancer risk among hairdressers: a pooled analysis of case-control studies conducted between 1985 and 2010.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2013
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Increased lung cancer risks among hairdressers were observed in large registry-based cohort studies from Scandinavia, but these studies could not adjust for smoking. Our objective was to evaluate the lung cancer risk among hairdressers while adjusting for smoking and other confounders in a pooled database of 16 case-control studies conducted in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand between 1985 and 2010 (the Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies on the Joint Effects of Occupational Carcinogens in the Development of Lung Cancer). Lifetime occupational and smoking information was collected through interviews with 19,369 cases of lung cancer and 23,674 matched population or hospital controls. Overall, 170 cases and 167 controls had ever worked as hairdresser or barber. The odds ratios for lung cancer in women were 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 2.35) without adjustment for smoking and 1.12 (95% CI: 0.75, 1.68) with adjustment for smoking; however, women employed before 1954 also experienced an increased lung cancer risk after adjustment for smoking (odds ratio = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.09, 6.47). The odds ratios in male hairdressers/barbers were generally not elevated, except for an increased odds ratio for adenocarcinoma in long-term barbers (odds ratio = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.02, 4.77). Our results suggest that the increased lung cancer risks among hairdressers are due to their smoking behavior; single elevated risk estimates should be interpreted with caution and need replication in other studies.
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Welding and lung cancer in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-19-2013
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Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.
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Modifiable factors associated with nonadherence to maintenance medication for inflammatory bowel disease.
Inflamm. Bowel Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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Poor adherence frequently impaired the efficacy of therapy to maintain remission from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). There is a lack of practical and effective interventions to improve adherence. This study aimed to identify modifiable risk factors, which may yield targets for new interventions.
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Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.
Madalene A Earp, Linda E Kelemen, Anthony M Magliocco, Kenneth D Swenerton, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Yi Lu, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Peter A Fasching, Diether Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Jennifer A Doherty, Mary Anne Rossing, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Grace Friel, Kirsten B Moysich, Kunle Odunsi, Lara Sucheston-Campbell, Galina Lurie, Marc T Goodman, Michael E Carney, Pamela J Thompson, Ingo B Runnebaum, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Thilo Dörk, Natalia Antonenkova, Natalia Bogdanova, Arto Leminen, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Francesmary Modugno, Robert P Edwards, Roberta B Ness, Andreas du Bois, Florian Heitz, Ira Schwaab, Philipp Harter, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Allan Jensen, Susanne K Kjær, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Thomas A Sellers, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Julie M Cunningham, Robert A Vierkant, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Melissa C Southey, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Joellen M Schildkraut, Edwin S Iversen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Andrew Berchuck, Daniel W Cramer, Kathryn L Terry, Elizabeth M Poole, Shelley S Tworoger, Elisa V Bandera, Urmila Chandran, Irene Orlow, Sara H Olson, Elisabeth Wik, Helga B Salvesen, Line Bjorge, Mari K Halle, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie T Bean, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ed Dicks, Joe Dennis, Douglas F Easton, Honglin Song, Jonathan P Tyrer, Paul D P Pharoah, Diana Eccles, Ian G Campbell, Alice S Whittemore, Valerie McGuire, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, James M Flanagan, James Paul, Robert Brown, Catherine M Phelan, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Steven A Narod, Argyrios Ziogas, Hoda Anton-Culver, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Usha Menon, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Lukasz M Szafron, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le, Angela Brooks-Wilson.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.
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Iris melanoma in children: Current approach to management.
Oman J Ophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2013
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Iris melanoma usually affects middle aged, Caucasian patients with light colored eyes. Pediatric iris melanoma is rare. A 15-year-old Caucasian male presented with 1-month history of a brown nodule in the inferotemporal aspect of his left eye. Iris nevus was diagnosed, and the patient was observed. Nearly 2 years later the lesion had grown in basal diameter and thickness, and the tumor was excised by partial lamellar scleral flap and sector iridectomy. Histopathology confirmed spindle cell iris melanoma. Two years post-operatively, tumor recurrence with anterior chamber angle involvement and secondary glaucoma developed. He was then treated with custom designed Iodine(125) plaque radiotherapy. This case demonstrates the recurrence of iris melanoma despite proper initial surgical management, and outlines current management options for pediatric iris melanoma.
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Enteroendocrine cells in gastrointestinal pathophysiology.
Curr Opin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2013
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Enteroendocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract play an important role in the regulation of appetite and digestive responses through the secretion of peptides. Their involvement in gastrointestinal diseases has been acknowledged, but relatively few studies have sought to clearly define their role in the pathogenesis or as therapeutic targets. Recent, but still limited, work has identified new roles for EEC in GI diseases.
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Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes in a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers.
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Parasites affect food web structure primarily through increased diversity and complexity.
PLoS Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2013
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Comparative research on food web structure has revealed generalities in trophic organization, produced simple models, and allowed assessment of robustness to species loss. These studies have mostly focused on free-living species. Recent research has suggested that inclusion of parasites alters structure. We assess whether such changes in network structure result from unique roles and traits of parasites or from changes to diversity and complexity. We analyzed seven highly resolved food webs that include metazoan parasite data. Our analyses show that adding parasites usually increases link density and connectance (simple measures of complexity), particularly when including concomitant links (links from predators to parasites of their prey). However, we clarify prior claims that parasites "dominate" food web links. Although parasites can be involved in a majority of links, in most cases classic predation links outnumber classic parasitism links. Regarding network structure, observed changes in degree distributions, 14 commonly studied metrics, and link probabilities are consistent with scale-dependent changes in structure associated with changes in diversity and complexity. Parasite and free-living species thus have similar effects on these aspects of structure. However, two changes point to unique roles of parasites. First, adding parasites and concomitant links strongly alters the frequency of most motifs of interactions among three taxa, reflecting parasites roles as resources for predators of their hosts, driven by trophic intimacy with their hosts. Second, compared to free-living consumers, many parasites feeding niches appear broader and less contiguous, which may reflect complex life cycles and small body sizes. This study provides new insights about generic versus unique impacts of parasites on food web structure, extends the generality of food web theory, gives a more rigorous framework for assessing the impact of any species on trophic organization, identifies limitations of current food web models, and provides direction for future structural and dynamical models.
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Structured gastroenterological intervention and improved outcome for patients with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms following pelvic radiotherapy.
Support Care Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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Fifty percent of patients develop chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms following pelvic radiotherapy that adversely affect quality of life. Fewer than 20 % are referred to a gastroenterologist. We aimed to determine if structured gastroenterological evaluation is of benefit to this patient group.
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Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.
Hui Shen, Brooke L Fridley, Honglin Song, Kate Lawrenson, Julie M Cunningham, Susan J Ramus, Mine S Cicek, Jonathan Tyrer, Douglas Stram, Melissa C Larson, Martin Köbel, , Argyrios Ziogas, Wei Zheng, Hannah P Yang, Anna H Wu, Eva L Wozniak, Yin Ling Woo, Boris Winterhoff, Elisabeth Wik, Alice S Whittemore, Nicolas Wentzensen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Allison F Vitonis, Daniel Vincent, Robert A Vierkant, Ignace Vergote, David Van Den Berg, Anne M Van Altena, Shelley S Tworoger, Pamela J Thompson, Daniel C Tessier, Kathryn L Terry, Soo-Hwang Teo, Claire Templeman, Daniel O Stram, Melissa C Southey, Weiva Sieh, Nadeem Siddiqui, Yurii B Shvetsov, Xiao-Ou Shu, Viji Shridhar, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Gianluca Severi, Ira Schwaab, Helga B Salvesen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Ingo B Runnebaum, Mary Anne Rossing, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Harvey A Risch, Stefan P Renner, Elizabeth M Poole, Malcolm C Pike, Catherine M Phelan, Liisa M Pelttari, Tanja Pejovic, James Paul, Irene Orlow, Siti Zawiah Omar, Sara H Olson, Kunle Odunsi, Stefan Nickels, Heli Nevanlinna, Roberta B Ness, Steven A Narod, Toru Nakanishi, Kirsten B Moysich, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Joanna Moes-Sosnowska, Francesmary Modugno, Usha Menon, John R McLaughlin, Valerie McGuire, Keitaro Matsuo, Noor Azmi Mat Adenan, Leon F A G Massuger, Galina Lurie, Lene Lundvall, Jan Lubiński, Jolanta Lissowska, Douglas A Levine, Arto Leminen, Alice W Lee, Nhu D Le, Sandrina Lambrechts, Diether Lambrechts, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Camilla Krakstad, Gottfried E Konecny, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Linda E Kelemen, Gary L Keeney, Beth Y Karlan, Rod Karevan, Kimberly R Kalli, Hiroaki Kajiyama, Bu-Tian Ji, Allan Jensen, Anna Jakubowska, Edwin Iversen, Satoyo Hosono, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Maureen Hoatlin, Peter Hillemanns, Florian Heitz, Rebecca Hein, Philipp Harter, Mari K Halle, Per Hall, Jacek Gronwald, Martin Gore, Marc T Goodman, Graham G Giles, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, James M Flanagan, Peter A Fasching, Arif B Ekici, Robert Edwards, Diana Eccles, Douglas F Easton, Matthias Dürst, Andreas du Bois, Thilo Dörk, Jennifer A Doherty, Evelyn Despierre, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Cezary Cybulski, Daniel W Cramer, Linda S Cook, Xiaoqing Chen, Bridget Charbonneau, Jenny Chang-Claude, Ian Campbell, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Doerthe Brueggmann, Robert Brown, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Louise A Brinton, Natalia Bogdanova, Matthew S Block, Elizabeth Benjamin, Jonathan Beesley, Matthias W Beckmann, Elisa V Bandera, Laura Baglietto, Francois Bacot, Sebastian M Armasu, Natalia Antonenkova, Hoda Anton-Culver, Katja K Aben, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, David Huntsman, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Peter W Laird, Ellen L Goode, Celeste Leigh Pearce.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.
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Multiple pesticide exposures and the risk of multiple myeloma in Canadian men.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Multiple myeloma (MM) has been linked to certain agricultural exposures, including pesticides. This analysis aimed to investigate the association between lifetime use of multiple pesticides and MM risk using two exposure metrics: number of pesticides used and days per year of pesticide use. A frequency-matched, population-based case-control study was conducted among men in six Canadian provinces between 1991 and 1994. Data from 342 MM cases and 1,357 controls were analyzed using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Pesticides were grouped by type, chemical class and carcinogenic potential, using a composite carcinogenic probability score. Selected individual pesticides were also examined. Regression models were adjusted for age, province of residence, use of proxy respondents, smoking and selected medical history variables. The overall pattern of results was complex. Positive trends in risk were observed for fungicides (ptrend=0.04) and pesticides classified as probably carcinogenic or higher (ptrend=0.03). Excess risks of MM were observed among men who reported using at least one carbamate pesticide (OR=1.94, 1.16-3.25), one phenoxy herbicide (OR=1.56, 1.09-2.25) and ?3 organochlorines (OR=2.21, 1.05-4.66). Significantly higher odds of MM were seen for exposure to carbaryl (OR=2.71, 1.47-5.00) and captan (OR=2.96, 1.40-6.24). Use of mecoprop for >2 days per year was also significantly associated with MM (OR=2.15, 1.03-4.48). Focusing on multiple pesticide exposures is important because this more accurately reflects how exposures occur in occupational settings. Significant associations observed for certain chemical classes and individual pesticides suggest that these may be MM risk factors.
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Identification and molecular characterization of a new ovarian cancer susceptibility locus at 17q21.31.
Jennifer Permuth-Wey, Kate Lawrenson, Howard C Shen, Aneliya Velkova, Jonathan P Tyrer, Zhihua Chen, Hui-Yi Lin, Y Ann Chen, Ya-Yu Tsai, Xiaotao Qu, Susan J Ramus, Rod Karevan, Janet Lee, Nathan Lee, Melissa C Larson, Katja K Aben, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, Sebastian M Armasu, , Francois Bacot, Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Greg Bloom, Natalia Bogdanova, Louise A Brinton, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Qiuyin Cai, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Stephen Chanock, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Jin Q Cheng, Mine S Cicek, Gerhard A Coetzee, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Andreas du Bois, Matthias Dürst, Douglas F Easton, Diana Eccles, Robert Edwards, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Graham G Giles, Rosalind M Glasspool, Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet, Marc T Goodman, Martin Gore, Bohdan Górski, Jacek Gronwald, Per Hall, Mari K Halle, Philipp Harter, Florian Heitz, Peter Hillemanns, Maureen Hoatlin, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Satoyo Hosono, Anna Jakubowska, Allan Jensen, Heather Jim, Kimberly R Kalli, Beth Y Karlan, Stanley B Kaye, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Fumitaka Kikkawa, Gottfried E Konecny, Camilla Krakstad, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Diether Lambrechts, Sandrina Lambrechts, Johnathan M Lancaster, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Douglas A Levine, Dong Liang, Boon Kiong Lim, Jie Lin, Jolanta Lissowska, Karen H Lu, Jan Lubiński, Galina Lurie, Leon F A G Massuger, Keitaro Matsuo, Valerie McGuire, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Francesmary Modugno, Kirsten B Moysich, Toru Nakanishi, Steven A Narod, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Houtan Noushmehr, Kunle Odunsi, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, James Paul, Celeste L Pearce, Tanja Pejovic, Liisa M Pelttari, Malcolm C Pike, Elizabeth M Poole, Paola Raska, Stefan P Renner, Harvey A Risch, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Mary Anne Rossing, Anja Rudolph, Ingo B Runnebaum, Iwona K Rzepecka, Helga B Salvesen, Ira Schwaab, Gianluca Severi, Viji Shridhar, Xiao-Ou Shu, Yurii B Shvetsov, Weiva Sieh, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Beata Spiewankiewicz, Daniel Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Soo-Hwang Teo, Kathryn L Terry, Daniel C Tessier, Pamela J Thompson, Shelley S Tworoger, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Daniel Vincent, Allison F Vitonis, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Nicolas Wentzensen, Alice S Whittemore, Elisabeth Wik, Lynne R Wilkens, Boris Winterhoff, Yin Ling Woo, Anna H Wu, Yong-Bing Xiang, Hannah P Yang, Wei Zheng, Argyrios Ziogas, Famida Zulkifli, Catherine M Phelan, Edwin Iversen, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Paul D P Pharoah, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Thomas A Sellers, Simon A Gayther.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a heritable component that remains to be fully characterized. Most identified common susceptibility variants lie in non-protein-coding sequences. We hypothesized that variants in the 3 untranslated region at putative microRNA (miRNA)-binding sites represent functional targets that influence EOC susceptibility. Here, we evaluate the association between 767 miRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) and EOC risk in 18,174 EOC cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies genotyped through the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study. We identify several miRSNPs associated with invasive serous EOC risk (odds ratio=1.12, P=10(-8)) mapping to an inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31. Additional genotyping of non-miRSNPs at 17q21.31 reveals stronger signals outside the inversion (P=10(-10)). Variation at 17q21.31 is associated with neurological diseases, and our collaboration is the first to report an association with EOC susceptibility. An integrated molecular analysis in this region provides evidence for ARHGAP27 and PLEKHM1 as candidate EOC susceptibility genes.
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Genetic analysis of the Trichuris muris-induced model of colitis reveals QTL overlap and a novel gene cluster for establishing colonic inflammation.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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Genetic susceptibility to colonic inflammation is poorly defined at the gene level. Although Genome Wide Association studies (GWAS) have identified loci in the human genome which confer susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohns and Ulcerative Colitis), it is not clear if precise loci exist which confer susceptibility to inflammation at specific locations within the gut e.g. small versus large intestine. Susceptibility loci for colitis in particular have been defined in the mouse, although specific candidate genes have not been identified to date. We have previously shown that infection with Trichuris muris (T. muris) induces chronic colitis in susceptible mouse strains with clinical, histological, and immunological homology to human colonic Crohns disease. We performed an integrative analysis of colitis susceptibility, using an F2 inter-cross of resistant (BALB/c) and susceptible (AKR) mice following T. muris infection. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL), polymorphic and expression data were analysed alongside in silico workflow analyses to discover novel candidate genes central to the development and biology of chronic colitis.
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High-risk retinoblastoma based on international classification of retinoblastoma: analysis of 519 enucleated eyes.
Ophthalmology
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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To determine the correlation between the International Classification of Retinoblastoma (ICRB) and histopathologic high-risk retinoblastoma.
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Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.
Stig E Bojesen, Karen A Pooley, Sharon E Johnatty, Jonathan Beesley, Kyriaki Michailidou, Jonathan P Tyrer, Stacey L Edwards, Hilda A Pickett, Howard C Shen, Chanel E Smart, Kristine M Hillman, Phuong L Mai, Kate Lawrenson, Michael D Stutz, Yi Lu, Rod Karevan, Nicholas Woods, Rebecca L Johnston, Juliet D French, Xiaoqing Chen, Maren Weischer, Sune F Nielsen, Melanie J Maranian, Maya Ghoussaini, Shahana Ahmed, Caroline Baynes, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Lesley McGuffog, Daniel Barrowdale, Andrew Lee, Sue Healey, Michael Lush, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Françis Bacot, , Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Harvey A Risch, Anna González-Neira, Mary Anne Rossing, Guillermo Pita, Jennifer A Doherty, Nuria Alvarez, Melissa C Larson, Brooke L Fridley, Nils Schoof, Jenny Chang-Claude, Mine S Cicek, Julian Peto, Kimberly R Kalli, Annegien Broeks, Sebastian M Armasu, Marjanka K Schmidt, Linde M Braaf, Boris Winterhoff, Heli Nevanlinna, Gottfried E Konecny, Diether Lambrechts, Lisa Rogmann, Pascal Guénel, Attila Teoman, Roger L Milne, Joaquín J García, Angela Cox, Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Rebecca Hein, Elinor J Sawyer, Christopher A Haiman, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Irene L Andrulis, Kirsten B Moysich, John L Hopper, Kunle Odunsi, Annika Lindblom, Graham G Giles, Hermann Brenner, Jacques Simard, Galina Lurie, Peter A Fasching, Michael E Carney, Paolo Radice, Lynne R Wilkens, Anthony Swerdlow, Marc T Goodman, Hiltrud Brauch, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Peter Hillemanns, Robert Winqvist, Matthias Dürst, Peter Devilee, Ingo Runnebaum, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Arto Mannermaa, Ralf Bützow, Natalia V Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Liisa M Pelttari, Wei Zheng, Arto Leminen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Clareann H Bunker, Vessela Kristensen, Roberta B Ness, Kenneth Muir, Robert Edwards, Alfons Meindl, Florian Heitz, Keitaro Matsuo, Andreas du Bois, Anna H Wu, Philipp Harter, Soo-Hwang Teo, Ira Schwaab, Xiao-Ou Shu, William Blot, Satoyo Hosono, Daehee Kang, Toru Nakanishi, Mikael Hartman, Yasushi Yatabe, Ute Hamann, Beth Y Karlan, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Valerie Gaborieau, Allan Jensen, Diana Eccles, Estrid Høgdall, Chen-Yang Shen, Judith Brown, Yin Ling Woo, Mitul Shah, Mat Adenan Noor Azmi, Robert Luben, Siti Zawiah Omar, Kamila Czene, Robert A Vierkant, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Celine Vachon, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Douglas A Levine, Anja Rudolph, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Edwin Iversen, Stefan Nickels, Joellen M Schildkraut, Isabel dos Santos Silva, Daniel W Cramer, Lorna Gibson, Kathryn L Terry, Olivia Fletcher, Allison F Vitonis, C Ellen van der Schoot, Elizabeth M Poole, Frans B L Hogervorst, Shelley S Tworoger, Jianjun Liu, Elisa V Bandera, Jingmei Li, Sara H Olson, Keith Humphreys, Irene Orlow, Carl Blomqvist, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Kristiina Aittomäki, Helga B Salvesen, Taru A Muranen, Elisabeth Wik, Barbara Brouwers, Camilla Krakstad, Els Wauters, Mari K Halle, Hans Wildiers, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Claire Mulot, Katja K Aben, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Anne Mvan Altena, Thérèse Truong, Leon F A G Massuger, Javier Benitez, Tanja Pejovic, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Maureen Hoatlin, M Pilar Zamora, Linda S Cook, Sabapathy P Balasubramanian, Linda E Kelemen, Andreas Schneeweiss, Nhu D Le, Christof Sohn, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Cezary Cybulski, Brian E Henderson, Janusz Menkiszak, Fredrick Schumacher, Nicolas Wentzensen, Loic Le Marchand, Hannah P Yang, Anna Marie Mulligan, Gord Glendon, Svend Aage Engelholm, Julia A Knight, Claus K Høgdall, Carmel Apicella, Martin Gore, Helen Tsimiklis, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Agnes Jager, Ans M Wvan den Ouweland, Robert Brown, John W M Martens, James M Flanagan, Mieke Kriege, James Paul, Sara Margolin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Gianluca Severi, Alice S Whittemore, Laura Baglietto, Valerie McGuire, Christa Stegmaier, Weiva Sieh, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, France Labrèche, Yu-Tang Gao, Mark S Goldberg, Gong Yang, Martine Dumont, John R McLaughlin, Arndt Hartmann, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Catherine M Phelan, Michael P Lux, Jenny Permuth-Wey, Bernard Peissel, Thomas A Sellers, Filomena Ficarazzi, Monica Barile, Argyrios Ziogas, Alan Ashworth, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Michael Jones, Susan J Ramus, Nick Orr, Usha Menon, Celeste L Pearce, Thomas Brüning, Malcolm C Pike, Yon-Dschun Ko, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Stephen J Chanock, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Katri Pylkäs, Mariusz Bidzinski, Saila Kauppila, Antoinette Hollestelle, Caroline Seynaeve, Rob A E M Tollenaar, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska, Jaana M Hartikainen, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Natalia N Antonenkova, Jirong Long, Martha Shrubsole, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Artitaya Lophatananon, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Nina Ditsch, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Chiu-Chen Tseng, Daniel O Stram, David Van Den Berg, Cheng Har Yip, M Kamran Ikram, Yew-Ching Teh, Hui Cai, Wei Lu, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Dong-Young Noh, Keun-Young Yoo, Hui Miao, Philip Tsau-Choong Iau, Yik Ying Teo, James McKay, Charles Shapiro, Foluso Ademuyiwa, George Fountzilas, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Ming-Feng Hou, Catherine S Healey, Craig Luccarini, Susan Peock, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Paolo Peterlongo, Timothy R Rebbeck, Marion Piedmonte, Christian F Singer, Eitan Friedman, Mads Thomassen, Kenneth Offit, Thomas V O Hansen, Susan L Neuhausen, Csilla I Szabo, Ignacio Blanco, Judy Garber, Steven A Narod, Jeffrey N Weitzel, Marco Montagna, Edith Olah, Andrew K Godwin, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, David E Goldgar, Trinidad Caldés, Evgeny N Imyanitov, Laima Tihomirova, Banu K Arun, Ian Campbell, Arjen R Mensenkamp, Christi J van Asperen, Kees E P van Roozendaal, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, J Margriet Collée, Jan C Oosterwijk, Maartje J Hooning, Matti A Rookus, Rob B van der Luijt, Theo A Mvan Os, D Gareth Evans, Debra Frost, Elena Fineberg, Julian Barwell, Lisa Walker, M John Kennedy, Radka Platte, Rosemarie Davidson, Steve D Ellis, Trevor Cole, Brigitte Bressac-de Paillerets, Bruno Buecher, Francesca Damiola, Laurence Faivre, Marc Frénay, Olga M Sinilnikova, Olivier Caron, Sophie Giraud, Sylvie Mazoyer, Valérie Bonadona, Virginie Caux-Moncoutier, Aleksandra Toloczko-Grabarek, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Byrski, Amanda B Spurdle, Bernardo Bonanni, Daniela Zaffaroni, Giuseppe Giannini, Loris Bernard, Riccardo Dolcetti, Siranoush Manoukian, Norbert Arnold, Christoph Engel, Helmut Deissler, Kerstin Rhiem, Dieter Niederacher, Hansjoerg Plendl, Christian Sutter, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Ake Borg, Beatrice Melin, Johanna Rantala, Maria Soller, Katherine L Nathanson, Susan M Domchek, Gustavo C Rodriguez, Ritu Salani, Daphne Gschwantler Kaulich, Muy-Kheng Tea, Shani Shimon Paluch, Yael Laitman, Anne-Bine Skytte, Torben A Kruse, Uffe Birk Jensen, Mark Robson, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Bent Ejlertsen, Lenka Foretova, Sharon A Savage, Jenny Lester, Penny Soucy, Karoline B Kuchenbaecker, Curtis Olswold, Julie M Cunningham, Susan Slager, Vernon S Pankratz, Ed Dicks, Sunil R Lakhani, Fergus J Couch, Per Hall, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Roger R Reddel, Ellen L Goode, Mark H Greene, Douglas F Easton, Andrew Berchuck, Antonis C Antoniou, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Alison M Dunning.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ?480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
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GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer.
Paul D P Pharoah, Ya-Yu Tsai, Susan J Ramus, Catherine M Phelan, Ellen L Goode, Kate Lawrenson, Melissa Buckley, Brooke L Fridley, Jonathan P Tyrer, Howard Shen, Rachel Weber, Rod Karevan, Melissa C Larson, Honglin Song, Daniel C Tessier, Francois Bacot, Daniel Vincent, Julie M Cunningham, Joe Dennis, Ed Dicks, , Katja K Aben, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Sebastian M Armasu, Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Greg Bloom, Natalia Bogdanova, James D Brenton, Louise A Brinton, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Ian Campbell, Michael E Carney, Renato S Carvalho, Jenny Chang-Claude, Y Anne Chen, Zhihua Chen, Wong-Ho Chow, Mine S Cicek, Gerhard Coetzee, Linda S Cook, Daniel W Cramer, Cezary Cybulski, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Andreas du Bois, Matthias Dürst, Diana Eccles, Robert Edwards, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, David Fenstermacher, James Flanagan, Yu-Tang Gao, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Graham Giles, Anxhela Gjyshi, Martin Gore, Jacek Gronwald, Qi Guo, Mari K Halle, Philipp Harter, Alexander Hein, Florian Heitz, Peter Hillemanns, Maureen Hoatlin, Estrid Høgdall, Claus K Høgdall, Satoyo Hosono, Anna Jakubowska, Allan Jensen, Kimberly R Kalli, Beth Y Karlan, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Gottfried E Konecny, Camilla Krakstad, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Diether Lambrechts, Sandrina Lambrechts, Nhu D Le, Nathan Lee, Janet Lee, Arto Leminen, Boon Kiong Lim, Jolanta Lissowska, Jan Lubiński, Lene Lundvall, Galina Lurie, Leon F A G Massuger, Keitaro Matsuo, Valerie McGuire, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Francesmary Modugno, Kirsten B Moysich, Toru Nakanishi, Steven A Narod, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Houtan Noushmehr, Kunle Odunsi, Sara Olson, Irene Orlow, James Paul, Tanja Pejovic, Liisa M Pelttari, Jenny Permuth-Wey, Malcolm C Pike, Elizabeth M Poole, Xiaotao Qu, Harvey A Risch, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Mary Anne Rossing, Anja Rudolph, Ingo Runnebaum, Iwona K Rzepecka, Helga B Salvesen, Ira Schwaab, Gianluca Severi, Hui Shen, Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, Xiao-Ou Shu, Weiva Sieh, Melissa C Southey, Paul Spellman, Kazuo Tajima, Soo-Hwang Teo, Kathryn L Terry, Pamela J Thompson, Agnieszka Timorek, Shelley S Tworoger, Anne M Van Altena, David Van Den Berg, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Allison F Vitonis, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Nicolas Wentzensen, Alice S Whittemore, Elisabeth Wik, Boris Winterhoff, Yin Ling Woo, Anna H Wu, Hannah P Yang, Wei Zheng, Argyrios Ziogas, Famida Zulkifli, Marc T Goodman, Per Hall, Douglas F Easton, Celeste L Pearce, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Edwin Iversen, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Simon A Gayther, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. We performed follow-up genotyping in 18,174 individuals with EOC (cases) and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 that were previously found to have associations close to genome-wide significance and identified three loci newly associated with risk: two loci associated with all EOC subtypes at 8q21 (rs11782652, P = 5.5 × 10(-9)) and 10p12 (rs1243180, P = 1.8 × 10(-8)) and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210, P = 8.1 × 10(-10)). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility and implicated CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer.
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Adaptive immunity alters distinct host feeding pathways during nematode induced inflammation, a novel mechanism in parasite expulsion.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Gastrointestinal infection is often associated with hypophagia and weight loss; however, the precise mechanisms governing these responses remain poorly defined. Furthermore, the possibility that alterations in feeding during infection may be beneficial to the host requires further study. We used the nematode Trichinella spiralis, which transiently inhabits the small intestine before migrating to skeletal muscle, as a biphasic model of infection to determine the cellular and molecular pathways controlling feeding during enteric and peripheral inflammation. Through the infection of genetically modified mice lacking cholecystokinin, Tumor necrosis factor ? receptors and T and B-cells, we observed a biphasic hypophagic response to infection resulting from two separate immune-driven mechanisms. The enteroendocrine I-cell derived hormone cholecystokinin is an essential mediator of initial hypophagia and is induced by CD4+ T-cells during enteritis. In contrast, the second hypophagic response is extra-intestinal and due to the anorectic effects of TNF? during peripheral infection of the muscle. Moreover, via maintaining naive levels of the adipose secreted hormone leptin throughout infection we demonstrate a novel feedback loop in the immunoendocrine axis. Immune driven I-cell hyperplasia and resultant weight loss leads to a reduction in the inflammatory adipokine leptin, which in turn heightens protective immunity during infection. These results characterize specific immune mediated mechanisms which reduce feeding during intestinal or peripheral inflammation. Importantly, the molecular mediators of each phase are entirely separate. The data also introduce the first evidence that I-cell hyperplasia is an adaptively driven immune response that directly impinges on the outcome to infection.
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Exposures to multiple pesticides and the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma in Canadian men.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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To determine the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) associated with exposures to multiple pesticides grouped by various classes, including carcinogenic classifications.
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Hierarchical modeling identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility variants in inflammation pathways among 10,140 cases and 11,012 controls.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Recent evidence suggests that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we used a two-stage approach to investigate associations between genetic variants in inflammation pathways and lung cancer risk based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. A total of 7,650 sequence variants from 720 genes relevant to inflammation pathways were identified using keyword and pathway searches from Gene Cards and Gene Ontology databases. In Stage 1, six GWAS datasets from the International Lung Cancer Consortium were pooled (4,441 cases and 5,094 controls of European ancestry), and a hierarchical modeling (HM) approach was used to incorporate prior information for each of the variants into the analysis. The prior matrix was constructed using (1) role of genes in the inflammation and immune pathways; (2) physical properties of the variants including the location of the variants, their conservation scores and amino acid coding; (3) LD with other functional variants and (4) measures of heterogeneity across the studies. HM affected the priority ranking of variants particularly among those having low prior weights, imprecise estimates and/or heterogeneity across studies. In Stage 2, we used an independent NCI lung cancer GWAS study (5,699 cases and 5,818 controls) for in silico replication. We identified one novel variant at the level corrected for multiple comparisons (rs2741354 in EPHX2 at 8q21.1 with p value = 7.4 × 10(-6)), and confirmed the associations between TERT (rs2736100) and the HLA region and lung cancer risk. HM allows for prior knowledge such as from bioinformatic sources to be incorporated into the analysis systematically, and it represents a complementary analytical approach to the conventional GWAS analysis.
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Design of a Microchannel-Nanochannel-Microchannel Array Based Nanoelectroporation System for Precise Gene Transfection.
Small
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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A micro/nano-fabrication process of a nanochannel electroporation (NEP) array and its application for precise delivery of plasmid for non-viral gene transfection is described. A dip-combing device is optimized to produce DNA nanowires across a microridge array patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface with a yield up to 95%. Molecular imprinting based on a low viscosity resin, 1,4-butanediol diacrylate (1,4-BDDA), adopted to convert the microridge-nanowire-microridge array into a microchannel-nanochannel-microchannel (MNM) array. Secondary machining by femtosecond laser ablation is applied to shorten one side of microchannels from 3000 to 50 ?m to facilitate cell loading and unloading. The biochip is then sealed in a packaging case with reservoirs and microfluidic channels to enable cell and plasmid loading, and to protect the biochip from leakage and contamination. The package case can be opened for cell unloading after NEP to allow for the follow-up cell culture and analysis. These NEP cases can be placed in a spinning disc and up to ten discs can be piled together for spinning. The resulting centrifugal force can simultaneously manipulate hundreds or thousands of cells into microchannels of NEP arrays within 3 minutes. To demonstrate its application, a 13 kbp OSKM plasmid of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is injected into mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells (MEFCs). Fluorescence detection of transfected cells within the NEP biochips shows that the delivered dosage is high and much more uniform compared with similar gene transfection carried out by the conventional bulk electroporation (BEP) method.
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Asthma and lung cancer risk: a systematic investigation by the International Lung Cancer Consortium.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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Asthma has been hypothesized to be associated with lung cancer (LC) risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of 16 studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) to quantitatively assess this association and compared the results with 36 previously published studies. In total, information from 585?444 individuals was used. Study-specific measures were combined using random effects models. A meta-regression and subgroup meta-analyses were performed to identify sources of heterogeneity. The overall LC relative risk (RR) associated with asthma was 1.28 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 1.16-1.41] but with large heterogeneity (I(2) = 73%, P < 0.001) between studies. Among ILCCO studies, an increased risk was found for squamous cell (RR = 1.69, 95%, CI = 1.26-2.26) and for small-cell carcinoma (RR = 1.71, 95% CI = 0.99-2.95) but was weaker for adenocarcinoma (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.88-1.36). The increased LC risk was strongest in the 2 years after asthma diagnosis (RR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.09-4.17) but subjects diagnosed with asthma over 10 years prior had no or little increased LC risk (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.94-1.30). Because the increased incidence of LC was chiefly observed in small cell and squamous cell lung carcinomas, primarily within 2 years of asthma diagnosis and because the association was weak among never smokers, we conclude that the association may not reflect a causal effect of asthma on the risk of LC.
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Soft-tissue sarcoma and pesticides exposure in men: results of a Canadian case-control study.
J. Occup. Environ. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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The objective was to investigate the putative associations of specific pesticides with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS).
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Calcium and vitamin D and risk of colorectal cancer: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario.
Can J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2011
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Previous epidemiological studies have been suggestive but inconclusive in demonstrating inverse associations of calcium, vitamin D, dairy product intakes with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a large population-based comparison of such associations in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON).
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Clinical impact of unclassified variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.
J. Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2011
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Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have high risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers. The functional effect of many missense variants on BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein function is not known. Here, the authors construct a historical cohort of 4030 female first-degree relatives of 1345 unselected patients with ovarian cancer who have been screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. The authors compared the risks by the age of 80 years for all cancers combined in female first-degree relatives of women with a pathogenic mutation, women with a variant of unknown significance (unclassified variant) and non-carriers. The cumulative risk of cancer among the relatives of patients with a pathogenic mutation was much higher than the risk in relatives of non-carriers (50.2% vs 28.5%; HR=2.87, p<10(-4)). In contrast, the cumulative risk of cancer among relatives of patients carrying an unclassified variant was similar to the risk of cancer for relatives of non-carriers (27.6% vs 28.5%; HR=1.08, p=0.79). The authors used three different algorithms to predict the pathogenicity of unclassified variants and compared their penetrance with non-carriers. In this sample, only Align Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation appeared to predict penetrance based on first-degree relatives.
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Trichothecene mycotoxins inhibit mitochondrial translation--implication for the mechanism of toxicity.
Toxins (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
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Fusarium head blight (FHB) reduces crop yield and results in contamination of grains with trichothecene mycotoxins. We previously showed that mitochondria play a critical role in the toxicity of a type B trichothecene. Here, we investigated the direct effects of type A and type B trichothecenes on mitochondrial translation and membrane integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sensitivity to trichothecenes increased when functional mitochondria were required for growth, and trichothecenes inhibited mitochondrial translation at concentrations, which did not inhibit total translation. In organello translation in isolated mitochondria was inhibited by type A and B trichothecenes, demonstrating that these toxins have a direct effect on mitochondrial translation. In intact yeast cells trichothecenes showed dose-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species, but only at doses higher than those affecting mitochondrial translation. These results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial translation is a primary target of trichothecenes and is not secondary to the disruption of mitochondrial membranes.
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8 x 120 Gb/s unrepeatered transmission over 444 km (76.6 dB) using distributed Raman amplification and ROPA without discrete amplification.
Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2011
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Unrepeatered transmission of 8 x 120 Gb/s over 444.2 km (76.6 dB) and multi-rate transmission of 8 x 120 Gb/s and 9 x 10.7 Gb/s over a 75.4 dB span have been demonstrated with off-line digital processing for the coherent 120 Gb/s channels. Transmission of 2 x 120 Gb/s with 7 x 12.5 Gb/s over 78 dB is also demonstrated with a real-time ASIC processor. All transmission results have been achieved using standard effective-area pure-silica-core fiber using forward and backward distributed Raman amplification and remotely-pumped erbium fiber. ASIC real-time processed results match well with off-line processing.
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Mouse chimeras as a system to investigate development, cell and tissue function, disease mechanisms and organ regeneration.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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Chimeras are organisms composed of at least two genetically distinct cell lineages originating from different zygotes. In the laboratory, mouse chimeras can be produced experimentally; various techniques allow combining different early stage mouse embryos with each other or with pluripotent stem cells. Identification of the progeny of the different lineages in chimeras permits to follow cell fate and function, enabling correlation of genotype with phenotype. Mouse chimeras have become a tool to investigate critical developmental processes, including cell specification, differentiation, patterning, and the function of specific genes. In addition, chimeras can also be generated to address biological processes in the adult, including mechanisms underlying diseases or tissue repair and regeneration. This review summarizes the different types of chimeras and how they have been generated and provides examples of how mouse chimeras offer a unique and powerful system to investigate questions pertaining to cell and tissue function in the developing and adult organism.
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Multiple myeloma and occupational exposures: a population-based case-control study.
J. Occup. Environ. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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The present study aims to identify occupational exposures associated with incidence of multiple myeloma (MM).
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Exposure to multiple pesticides and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in men from six Canadian provinces.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has been linked to several agricultural exposures, including some commonly used pesticides. Although there is a significant body of literature examining the effects of exposure to individual pesticides on NHL, the impact of exposure to multiple pesticides or specific pesticide combinations has not been explored in depth. Data from a six-province Canadian case-control study conducted between 1991 and 1994 were analyzed to investigate the relationship between NHL, the total number of pesticides used and some common pesticide combinations. Cases (n=513) were identified through hospital records and provincial cancer registries and controls (n=1,506), frequency matched to cases by age and province of residence, were obtained through provincial health records, telephone listings, or voter lists. In multiple logistic regression analyses, risk of NHL increased with the number of pesticides used. Similar results were obtained in analyses restricted to herbicides, insecticides and several pesticide classes. Odds ratios increased further when only potentially carcinogenic pesticides were considered (OR[one pesticide]=1.30, 95% CI=0.90-1.88; OR[two to four]=1.54, CI=1.11-2.12; OR[five or more]=1.94, CI=1.17-3.23). Elevated risks were also found among those reporting use of malathion in combination with several other pesticides. These analyses support and extend previous findings that the risk of NHL increases with the number of pesticides used and some pesticide combinations.
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R723, a selective JAK2 inhibitor, effectively treats JAK2V617F-induced murine myeloproliferative neoplasm.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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The activating mutations in JAK2 (including JAK2V617F) that have been described in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are linked directly to MPN pathogenesis. We developed R723, an orally bioavailable small molecule that inhibits JAK2 activity in vitro by 50% at a concentration of 2nM, while having minimal effects on JAK3, TYK2, and JAK1 activity. R723 inhibited cytokine-independent CFU-E growth and constitutive activation of STAT5 in primary hematopoietic cells expressing JAK2V617F. In an anemia mouse model induced by phenylhydrazine, R723 inhibited erythropoiesis. In a leukemia mouse model using Ba/F3 cells expressing JAK2V617F, R723 treatment prolonged survival and decreased tumor burden. In V617F-transgenic mice that closely mimic human primary myelofibrosis, R723 treatment improved survival, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis. R723 preferentially targeted the JAK2-dependent pathway rather than the JAK1- and JAK3-dependent pathways in vivo, and its effects on T and B lymphocytes were mild compared with its effects on myeloid cells. Our preclinical data indicate that R723 has a favorable safety profile and the potential to become an efficacious treatment for patients with JAK2V617F-positive MPNs.
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LIN28B polymorphisms influence susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Defective microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis contributes to the development and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In this study, we examined the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in miRNA biogenesis genes may influence EOC risk. In an initial investigation, 318 SNPs in 18 genes were evaluated among 1,815 EOC cases and 1,900 controls, followed up by a replicative joint meta-analysis of data from an additional 2,172 cases and 3,052 controls. Of 23 SNPs from 9 genes associated with risk (empirical P < 0.05) in the initial investigation, the meta-analysis replicated 6 SNPs from the DROSHA, FMR1, LIN28, and LIN28B genes, including rs12194974 (G>A), an SNP in a putative transcription factor binding site in the LIN28B promoter region (summary OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.98; P = 0.015) which has been recently implicated in age of menarche and other phenotypes. Consistent with reports that LIN28B overexpression in EOC contributes to tumorigenesis by repressing tumor suppressor let-7 expression, we provide data from luciferase reporter assays and quantitative RT-PCR to suggest that the inverse association among rs12194974 A allele carriers may be because of reduced LIN28B expression. Our findings suggest that variants in LIN28B and possibly other miRNA biogenesis genes may influence EOC susceptibility.
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Inherited variants in mitochondrial biogenesis genes may influence epithelial ovarian cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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Mitochondria contribute to oxidative stress, a phenomenon implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that inherited variants in mitochondrial-related genes influence epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility.
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Evaluating the efficacy of lay health advisors for increasing risk-appropriate Pap test screening: a randomized controlled trial among Ohio Appalachian women.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Cervical cancer is a significant health disparity among women in Ohio Appalachia. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a lay health advisor (LHA) intervention for improving Papanicolaou (Pap) testing rates, to reduce cervical cancer, among women in need of screening.
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Effects of tomato- and soy-rich diets on the IGF-I hormonal network: a crossover study of postmenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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To determine whether dietary modifications with tomato products and/or a soy supplement affected circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and other markers of cell signaling in postmenopausal women at risk for developing breast cancer. Eligible and consented postmenopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer were enrolled in a 26-week, two-arm (tomato and soy, 10 weeks each) longitudinal dietary intervention study in which each woman served as her own control. Changes in biochemical endpoints including IGF-I, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), C-peptide, and insulin were measured for each intervention arm. Carotenoid and isoflavone levels were measured to assess adherence. Significant increases in carotenoid and isoflavone levels during the tomato and soy study arms, respectively, suggested that women were adherent to both arms of the intervention. The tomato-rich diet had little effect on cell-signaling biomarkers previously associated with breast cancer risk. However, results of the soy intervention showed that concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 increased by 21.6 and 154.7 ?mol/L, respectively (P = 0.001 for both) and SHBG decreased by 5.4 ?mol/L (P < 0.001) after consumption of the soy protein supplement. Increased soy protein intake may lead to small, but significant, increases in IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Soy consumption also led to a significant decrease in SHBG, which has been hypothesized to promote, rather than prevent, cancer growth. Previous epidemiologic studies, however, have confirmed protective effect of soy on breast cancer. Additional investigation about the effect of soy on breast cancer risk and its mechanism of action is warranted.
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Carbohydrate ingestion during exercise: effects on performance, training adaptations and trainability of the gut.
Nestle Nutr Inst Workshop Ser
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2011
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Carbohydrate feeding has been shown to enhance endurance performance. During exercise of 2 h or more, the delivery of carbohydrates to the muscle is the crucial step and appears to be limited by intestinal absorption. It is therefore important to identify ways to overcome this limitation and study the positive and negative effects of chronic carbohydrate supplementation. There is evidence that intestinal absorption can, at least partly, be overcome by making use of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Ingestion of these carbohydrates may result in higher intestinal absorption rates and has been shown to lead to higher rates of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation which can result in better endurance performance. It also seems possible to increase the absorptive capacity of the intestine by adapting to a high-carbohydrate diet. Carbohydrate supplementation during exercise has been suggested to reduce training adaptations, but at present there is little or no evidence to support this. Despite the fact that it has long been known that carbohydrate supplementation can enhance endurance performance, there are still many unanswered questions. However, there is potential to develop strategies that enhance the delivery of carbohydrates and thereby improve endurance performance.
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The role of KRAS rs61764370 in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer: implications for clinical testing.
Paul D P Pharoah, Rachel T Palmieri, Susan J Ramus, Simon A Gayther, Irene L Andrulis, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, David Goldgar, , Mary S Beattie, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Natalia Bogdanova, Kelly L Bolton, Wendy Brewster, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Trinidad Caldés, Maria Adelaide Caligo, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Y Ann Chen, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Diana M Eccles, Arif B Ekici, Douglas Easton, Peter A Fasching, Anna de Fazio, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Brooke L Fridley, Eitan Friedman, Bo Gao, Olga Sinilnikova, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andrew K Godwin, Ellen L Goode, Marc T Goodman, Jenny Gross, Thomas V O Hansen, Paul Harnett, Matti Rookus, Tuomas Heikkinen, Rebecca Hein, Claus Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Edwin S Iversen, Anna Jakubowska, Sharon E Johnatty, Beth Y Karlan, Noah D Kauff, Stanley B Kaye, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Diether Lambrechts, James P LaPolla, Conxi Lazaro, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Karin Leunen, Douglas A Levine, Yi Lu, Lene Lundvall, Stuart MacGregor, Tamara Marees, Leon F Massuger, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Marco Montagna, Kirsten B Moysich, Steven A Narod, Katherine L Nathanson, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Ana Osorio, Jim Paul, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Catherine M Phelan, Malcolm C Pike, Paolo Radice, Mary Anne Rossing, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, Christian F Singer, Honglin Song, Daniel O Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Annika Lindblom, Kathryn L Terry, Ya-Yu Tsai, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Allison F Vitonis, Christine Walsh, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Anna H Wu, Argyrios Ziogas, Andrew Berchuck, Harvey A Risch.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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An assay for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs61764370, has recently been commercially marketed as a clinical test to aid ovarian cancer risk evaluation in women with family histories of the disease. rs67164370 is in a 3-UTR miRNA binding site of the KRAS oncogene and is a candidate for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. However, only one published article, analyzing fewer than 1,000 subjects in total, has examined this association.
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AGRICOH: a consortium of agricultural cohorts.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.
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Small-molecule inhibitor leads of ribosome-inactivating proteins developed using the doorstop approach.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the ?-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL), thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2), produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2) from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays.
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A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.
James D McKay, Thérèse Truong, Valerie Gaborieau, Amélie Chabrier, Shu-Chun Chuang, Graham Byrnes, David Zaridze, Oxana Shangina, Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonóra Fabiánová, Alexandru Bucur, Vladimír Bencko, Ivana Holcatova, Vladimir Janout, Lenka Foretova, Pagona Lagiou, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Simone Benhamou, Christine Bouchardy, Wolfgang Ahrens, Franco Merletti, Lorenzo Richiardi, Renato Talamini, Luigi Barzan, Kristina Kjaerheim, Gary J Macfarlane, Tatiana V Macfarlane, Lorenzo Simonato, Cristina Canova, Antonio Agudo, Xavier Castellsague, Ray Lowry, David I Conway, Patricia A McKinney, Claire M Healy, Mary E Toner, Ariana Znaor, María Paula Curado, Sergio Koifman, Ana Menezes, Victor Wünsch-Filho, Jose Eluf Neto, Leticia Fernández Garrote, Stefania Boccia, Gabriella Cadoni, Dario Arzani, Andrew F Olshan, Mark C Weissler, William K Funkhouser, Jingchun Luo, Jan Lubiński, Joanna Trubicka, Marcin Lener, Dorota Oszutowska, Stephen M Schwartz, Chu Chen, Sherianne Fish, David R Doody, Joshua E Muscat, Philip Lazarus, Carla J Gallagher, Shen-Chih Chang, Zuo-Feng Zhang, Qingyi Wei, Erich M Sturgis, Li-E Wang, Silvia Franceschi, Rolando Herrero, Karl T Kelsey, Michael D McClean, Carmen J Marsit, Heather H Nelson, Marjorie Romkes, Shama Buch, Tomoko Nukui, Shilong Zhong, Martin Lacko, Johannes J Manni, Wilbert H M Peters, Rayjean J Hung, John Mclaughlin, Lars Vatten, Inger Njølstad, Gary E Goodman, John K Field, Triantafillos Liloglou, Paolo Vineis, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Domenico Palli, Rosario Tumino, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Carlos A González, J Ramon Quiros, Carmen Martínez, Carmen Navarro, Eva Ardanaz, Nerea Larranaga, Kay-Tee Khaw, Timothy Key, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Petra H M Peeters, Antonia Trichopoulou, Jakob Linseisen, Heiner Boeing, Göran Hallmans, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Merethe Kumle, Elio Riboli, Kristjan Välk, Tõnu Vooder, Tõnu Voodern, Andres Metspalu, Diana Zelenika, Anne Boland, Marc Delepine, Mario Foglio, Doris Lechner, Hélène Blanché, Ivo G Gut, Pilar Galán, Simon Heath, Mia Hashibe, Richard B Hayes, Paolo Boffetta, Mark Lathrop, Paul Brennan.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ? 5 × 10??). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p?=?1×10??) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10??) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10??); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10??; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.
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Promoter methylation of Wnt antagonists DKK1 and SFRP1 is associated with opposing tumor subtypes in two large populations of colorectal cancer patients.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Aberrant activation of canonical Wnt signaling is a hallmark event in colorectal carcinogenesis. The Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 1 (SFRP1) genes encode extracellular inhibitors of Wnt signaling that are frequently silenced by promoter hypermethylation in colorectal cancer (CRC). These methylation events have been identified as prognostic markers of patient outcome and tumor subtype in several cancers but similar roles in CRC have not been comprehensively examined. In CRC, the microsatellite instability (MSI) subtype associates with favorable disease outcome but the molecular events that are responsible remain poorly understood. Consequently, we quantified promoter methylation status of the Wnt antagonist genes DKK1 and SFRP1 in a large population-based cohort of CRCs from Ontario (n = 549) and Newfoundland (n = 696) stratified by MSI status. We examined the association between methylation status and clinicopathological features including tumor MSI status and patient survival. DKK1 and SFRP1 were methylated in 13 and 95% of CRCs, respectively. In Ontario, DKK1 methylation was strongly associated with MSI tumors after adjustment for age, sex and tumor location [odds ratio (OR) = 13.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 7.8-24.2, P < 0.001]. Conversely, SFRP1 methylation was inversely associated with MSI tumors after these adjustments (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.9, P = 0.009). Similar results were obtained in Newfoundland. There were no independent associations with recurrence-free survival. This is the first large study to identify associations between Wnt antagonist promoter hypermethylation and CRC MSI subtype. These events provide insight into subtype-specific epigenetic mediation of Wnt signaling in CRC.
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