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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Efficacy of antibody-based therapies to treat Alzheimer's disease: just a matter of timing?
Exp. Gerontol.
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2014
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A pharmaceutical intervention that has received great attention in recent years for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the use of antibodies targeting amyloid beta (A?) in the brain, as the formation of A? plaques is considered as being the driving force for the development and progression of AD. Recently, a Phase III trial in patients with mild-to-moderate AD has provided ambivalent evidence for the efficacy of this intervention. In this trial, the intravenous administration of bapineuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting A? in the brain, for 78weeks led to a reduction of cerebrospinal fluid levels of phosphorylated tau and evidence for lower A? accumulation in the brain of AD patients who carried APOE ?4. However, this treatment did not improve clinical outcomes (e.g. the rate of cognitive decline) in these patients. Similar null results with respect to the rate of cognitive decline were found in a separate Phase III clinical trial after treatment with solanezumab. Based on these findings, one conclusion could be that antibodies targeting A? in the brain may unfold their highest efficacy when given before the development of clinical AD symptoms, i.e. during a period where neurodegeneration but not cognitive loss represents the major pathology. Another conclusion could be that antibody-based pharmaceutical interventions may fail to slow the progress of cognitive loss in patients who have AD because of their solely pharmaceutical therapeutic approach. Leisure activities that require patients' mental and physical abilities (e.g. exercise) are associated with a reduced risk of developing dementia. In the same manner, they may help to curb the progress of this devastating disease. Thus, combining the use of antibodies targeting A? with therapeutic strategies that require patients' mental and physical abilities might help tackle the neurodegenerative dynamics and cognitive loss both in patients with AD, and its prodromal state, mild cognitive impairment.
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The human gastrointestinal tract-specific transcriptome and proteome as defined by RNA sequencing and antibody-based profiling.
J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is subdivided into different anatomical organs with many shared functions and characteristics, but also distinct differences. We have combined a genome-wide transcriptomics analysis with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to describe the gene and protein expression patterns that define the human GIT.
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Increased impulsivity in response to food cues after sleep loss in healthy young men.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2014
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To investigate whether acute total sleep deprivation (TSD) leads to decreased cognitive control when food cues are presented during a task requiring active attention, by assessing the ability to cognitively inhibit prepotent responses.
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Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects on liver and visceral fat accumulation in humans.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Excess ectopic fat storage is linked to type 2 diabetes. The importance of dietary fat composition for ectopic fat storage in humans is unknown. We investigated liver fat accumulation and body composition during overfeeding saturated fatty acids (SFAs) or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). LIPOGAIN was a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial. Thirty-nine young and normal-weight individuals were overfed muffins high in SFAs (palm oil) or n-6 PUFAs (sunflower oil) for 7 weeks. Liver fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), total adipose tissue, pancreatic fat, and lean tissue were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Transcriptomics were performed in SAT. Both groups gained similar weight. SFAs, however, markedly increased liver fat compared with PUFAs and caused a twofold larger increase in VAT than PUFAs. Conversely, PUFAs caused a nearly threefold larger increase in lean tissue than SFAs. Increase in liver fat directly correlated with changes in plasma SFAs and inversely with PUFAs. Genes involved in regulating energy dissipation, insulin resistance, body composition, and fat-cell differentiation in SAT were differentially regulated between diets, and associated with increased PUFAs in SAT. In conclusion, overeating SFAs promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage, whereas excess energy from PUFAs may instead promote lean tissue in healthy humans.
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Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid ? (A?) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of A? peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of A? 1-42 peptide in the brain.
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Watching TV and food intake: the role of content.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Obesity is a serious and growing health concern worldwide. Watching television (TV) represents a condition during which many habitually eat, irrespective of hunger level. However, as of yet, little is known about how the content of television programs being watched differentially impacts concurrent eating behavior. In this study, eighteen normal-weight female students participated in three counter-balanced experimental conditions, including a 'Boring' TV condition (art lecture), an 'Engaging' TV condition (Swedish TV comedy series), and a no TV control condition during which participants read (a text on insects living in Sweden). Throughout each condition participants had access to both high-calorie (M&Ms) and low-calorie (grapes) snacks. We found that, relative to the Engaging TV condition, Boring TV encouraged excessive eating (+52% g, P?=?0.009). Additionally, the Engaging TV condition actually resulted in significantly less concurrent intake relative to the control 'Text' condition (-35% g, P?=?0.05). This intake was driven almost entirely by the healthy snack, grapes; however, this interaction did not reach significance (P?=?0.07). Finally, there was a significant correlation between how bored participants were across all conditions, and their concurrent food intake (beta?=?0.317, P?=?0.02). Intake as measured by kcals was similarly patterned but did not reach significance. These results suggest that, for women, different TV programs elicit different levels of concurrent food intake, and that the degree to which a program is engaging (or alternately, boring) is related to that intake. Additionally, they suggest that emotional content (e.g. boring vs. engaging) may be more associated than modality (e.g. TV vs. text) with concurrent intake.
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Acute sleep deprivation increases food purchasing in men.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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To investigate if acute sleep deprivation affects food purchasing choices in a mock supermarket.
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Acute sleep deprivation increases portion size and affects food choice in young men.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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Acute sleep loss increases food intake in adults. However, little is known about the influence of acute sleep loss on portion size choice, and whether this depends on both hunger state and the type of food (snack or meal item) offered to an individual. The aim of the current study was to compare portion size choice after a night of sleep and a period of nocturnal wakefulness (a condition experienced by night-shift workers, e.g. physicians and nurses). Sixteen men (age: 23 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 23.6 ± 0.6 kg/m(2)) participated in a randomized within-subject design with two conditions, 8-h of sleep and total sleep deprivation (TSD). In the morning following sleep interventions, portion size, comprising meal and snack items, was measured using a computer-based task, in both fasted and sated state. In addition, hunger as well as plasma levels of ghrelin were measured. In the morning after TSD, subjects had increased plasma ghrelin levels (13%, p=0.04), and chose larger portions (14%, p=0.02), irrespective of the type of food, as compared to the sleep condition. Self-reported hunger was also enhanced (p<0.01). Following breakfast, sleep-deprived subjects chose larger portions of snacks (16%, p=0.02), whereas the selection of meal items did not differ between the sleep interventions (6%, p=0.13). Our results suggest that overeating in the morning after sleep loss is driven by both homeostatic and hedonic factors. Further, they show that portion size choice after sleep loss depend on both an individuals hunger status, and the type of food offered.
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Adipose tissue stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 index is increased and linoleic acid is decreased in obesity-prone rats fed a high-fat diet.
Lipids Health Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2013
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Fatty acid (FA) composition and desaturase indices are associated with obesity and related metabolic conditions. However, it is unclear to what extent desaturase activity in different lipid fractions contribute to obesity susceptibility. Our aim was to test whether desaturase activity and FA composition are linked to an obese phenotype in rats that are either obesity prone (OP) or resistant (OR) on a high-fat diet (HFD).
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Increased prefrontal and parahippocampal activation with reduced dorsolateral prefrontal and insular cortex activation to food images in obesity: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Obesity is emerging as the most significant health concern of the twenty-first century. A wealth of neuroimaging data suggest that weight gain might be related to aberrant brain function, particularly in prefrontal cortical regions modulating mesolimbic addictive responses to food. Nevertheless, food addiction is currently a model hotly debated. Here, we conduct a meta-analysis of neuroimaging data, examining the most common functional differences between normal-weight and obese participants in response to food stimuli.
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Comprehensive analysis of localization of 78 solute carrier genes throughout the subsections of the rat gastrointestinal tract.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Solute carriers (SLCs), the second largest super-family of membrane proteins in the human genome, transport amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, inorganic ions, essential metals and drugs over membranes. To date no study has provided a comprehensive analysis of SLC localization along the entire GI tract. The aim of the present study was to provide a comprehensive, segment-specific description of the localization of SLC genes along the rat GI tract by employing bioinformatics and molecular biology methods. The Unigene database was screened for rat SLC entries in the intestinal tissue. Using qPCR we measured expression of the annotated genes in the GI tract divided into the following segments: the esophagus, the corpus and the antrum of the stomach, the proximal and distal parts of the duodenum, ileum, jejunum and colon, and the cecum. Our Unigene-derived gene pool was expanded with data from in-house tissue panels and a literature search. We found 44 out of 78 (56%) of gut SLC transcripts to be expressed in all GI tract segments, whereas the majority of remaining SLCs were detected in more than five segments. SLCs are predominantly expressed in gut regions with absorptive functions although expression was also found in segments unrelated to absorption. The proximal jejunum had the highest number of differentially expressed SLCs. In conclusion, SLCs are a crucial molecular component of the GI tract, with many of them expressed along the entire GI tract. This work presents the first overall road map of localization of transporter genes in the GI tract.
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The obesity gene, TMEM18, is of ancient origin, found in majority of neuronal cells in all major brain regions and associated with obesity in severely obese children.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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TMEM18 is a hypothalamic gene that has recently been linked to obesity and BMI in genome wide association studies. However, the functional properties of TMEM18 are obscure.
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Adhesion GPCRs are widely expressed throughout the subsections of the gastrointestinal tract.
BMC Gastroenterol
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G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest families of transmembrane receptors and the most common drug target. The Adhesion subfamily is the second largest one of GPCRs and its several members are known to mediate neural development and immune system functioning through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The distribution of these receptors has not been characterized in detail in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we present the first comprehensive anatomical profiling of mRNA expression of all 30 Adhesion GPCRs in the rat GI tract divided into twelve subsegments.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.