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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Fast computation of voxel-level brain connectivity maps from resting-state functional MRI using l?-norm as approximation of Pearson's temporal correlation: proof-of-concept and example vector hardware implementation.
Med Eng Phys
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2014
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An outstanding issue in graph-based analysis of resting-state functional MRI is choice of network nodes. Individual consideration of entire brain voxels may represent a less biased approach than parcellating the cortex according to pre-determined atlases, but entails establishing connectedness for 1(9)-1(11) links, with often prohibitive computational cost. Using a representative Human Connectome Project dataset, we show that, following appropriate time-series normalization, it may be possible to accelerate connectivity determination replacing Pearson correlation with l1-norm. Even though the adjacency matrices derived from correlation coefficients and l1-norms are not identical, their similarity is high. Further, we describe and provide in full an example vector hardware implementation of l1-norm on an array of 4096 zero instruction-set processors. Calculation times <1000 s are attainable, removing the major deterrent to voxel-based resting-sate network mapping and revealing fine-grained node degree heterogeneity. L1-norm should be given consideration as a substitute for correlation in very high-density resting-state functional connectivity analyses.
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Multisite longitudinal reliability of tract-based spatial statistics in diffusion tensor imaging of healthy elderly subjects.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Large-scale longitudinal neuroimaging studies with diffusion imaging techniques are necessary to test and validate models of white matter neurophysiological processes that change in time, both in healthy and diseased brains. The predictive power of such longitudinal models will always be limited by the reproducibility of repeated measures acquired during different sessions. At present, there is limited quantitative knowledge about the across-session reproducibility of standard diffusion metrics in 3T multi-centric studies on subjects in stable conditions, in particular when using tract based spatial statistics and with elderly people. In this study we implemented a multi-site brain diffusion protocol in 10 clinical 3T MRI sites distributed across 4 countries in Europe (Italy, Germany, France and Greece) using vendor provided sequences from Siemens (Allegra, Trio Tim, Verio, Skyra, Biograph mMR), Philips (Achieva) and GE (HDxt) scanners. We acquired DTI data (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3), b = 700 s/mm(2), 5 b0 and 30 diffusion weighted volumes) of a group of healthy stable elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) in two separate sessions at least a week apart. For each subject and session four scalar diffusion metrics were considered: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivity. The diffusion metrics from multiple subjects and sessions at each site were aligned to their common white matter skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics. The reproducibility at each MRI site was examined by looking at group averages of absolute changes relative to the mean (%) on various parameters: i) reproducibility of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the b0 images in centrum semiovale, ii) full brain test-retest differences of the diffusion metric maps on the white matter skeleton, iii) reproducibility of the diffusion metrics on atlas-based white matter ROIs on the white matter skeleton. Despite the differences of MRI scanner configurations across sites (vendors, models, RF coils and acquisition sequences) we found good and consistent test-retest reproducibility. White matter b0 SNR reproducibility was on average 7 ± 1% with no significant MRI site effects. Whole brain analysis resulted in no significant test-retest differences at any of the sites with any of the DTI metrics. The atlas-based ROI analysis showed that the mean reproducibility errors largely remained in the 2-4% range for FA and AD and 2-6% for MD and RD, averaged across ROIs. Our results show reproducibility values comparable to those reported in studies using a smaller number of MRI scanners, slightly different DTI protocols and mostly younger populations. We therefore show that the acquisition and analysis protocols used are appropriate for multi-site experimental scenarios.
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Anterior temporal lobe degeneration produces widespread network-driven dysfunction.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2013
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The neural organization of semantic memory remains much debated. A distributed-only view contends that semantic knowledge is represented within spatially distant, modality-selective primary and association cortices. Observations in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia have inspired an alternative model featuring the anterior temporal lobe as an amodal hub that supports semantic knowledge by linking distributed modality-selective regions. Direct evidence has been lacking, however, to support intrinsic functional interactions between an anterior temporal lobe hub and upstream sensory regions in humans. Here, we examined the neural networks supporting semantic knowledge by performing a multimodal brain imaging study in healthy subjects and patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. In healthy subjects, the anterior temporal lobe showed intrinsic connectivity to an array of modality-selective primary and association cortices. Patients showed focal anterior temporal lobe degeneration but also reduced physiological integrity throughout distributed modality-selective regions connected with the anterior temporal lobe in healthy controls. Physiological deficits outside the anterior temporal lobe correlated with scores on semantic tasks and with anterior temporal subregion atrophy, following domain-specific and connectivity-based predictions. The findings provide a neurophysiological basis for the theory that semantic processing is orchestrated through interactions between a critical anterior temporal lobe hub and modality-selective processing nodes.
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Cerebrovascular reactivity mapping in patients with low grade gliomas undergoing presurgical sensorimotor mapping with BOLD fMRI.
J Magn Reson Imaging
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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(i) to validate blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) breathhold cerebrovascular reactivity (BH CVR) mapping as an effective technique for potential detection of neurovascular uncoupling (NVU) in a cohort of patients with perirolandic low grade gliomas undergoing presurgical functional MRI (fMRI) for sensorimotor mapping, and (ii) to determine whether NVU potential, as assessed by BH CVR mapping, is prevalent in this tumor group.
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Brain morphometry reproducibility in multi-center 3T MRI studies: a comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal segmentations.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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Large-scale longitudinal multi-site MRI brain morphometry studies are becoming increasingly crucial to characterize both normal and clinical population groups using fully automated segmentation tools. The test-retest reproducibility of morphometry data acquired across multiple scanning sessions, and for different MR vendors, is an important reliability indicator since it defines the sensitivity of a protocol to detect longitudinal effects in a consortium. There is very limited knowledge about how across-session reliability of morphometry estimates might be affected by different 3T MRI systems. Moreover, there is a need for optimal acquisition and analysis protocols in order to reduce sample sizes. A recent study has shown that the longitudinal FreeSurfer segmentation offers improved within session test-retest reproducibility relative to the cross-sectional segmentation at one 3T site using a nonstandard multi-echo MPRAGE sequence. In this study we implement a multi-site 3T MRI morphometry protocol based on vendor provided T1 structural sequences from different vendors (3D MPRAGE on Siemens and Philips, 3D IR-SPGR on GE) implemented in 8 sites located in 4 European countries. The protocols used mild acceleration factors (1.5-2) when possible. We acquired across-session test-retest structural data of a group of healthy elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) and compared the across-session reproducibility of two full-brain automated segmentation methods based on either longitudinal or cross-sectional FreeSurfer processing. The segmentations include cortical thickness, intracranial, ventricle and subcortical volumes. Reproducibility is evaluated as absolute changes relative to the mean (%), Dice coefficient for volume overlap and intraclass correlation coefficients across two sessions. We found that this acquisition and analysis protocol gives comparable reproducibility results to previous studies that used longer acquisitions without acceleration. We also show that the longitudinal processing is systematically more reliable across sites regardless of MRI system differences. The reproducibility errors of the longitudinal segmentations are on average approximately half of those obtained with the cross sectional analysis for all volume segmentations and for entorhinal cortical thickness. No significant differences in reliability are found between the segmentation methods for the other cortical thickness estimates. The average of two MPRAGE volumes acquired within each test-retest session did not systematically improve the across-session reproducibility of morphometry estimates. Our results extend those from previous studies that showed improved reliability of the longitudinal analysis at single sites and/or with non-standard acquisition methods. The multi-site acquisition and analysis protocol presented here is promising for clinical applications since it allows for smaller sample sizes per MRI site or shorter trials in studies evaluating the role of potential biomarkers to predict disease progression or treatment effects.
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The Use of a priori Information in ICA-Based Techniques for Real-Time fMRI: An Evaluation of Static/Dynamic and Spatial/Temporal Characteristics.
Front Hum Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Real-time brain functional MRI (rt-fMRI) allows in vivo non-invasive monitoring of neural networks. The use of multivariate data-driven analysis methods such as independent component analysis (ICA) offers an attractive trade-off between data interpretability and information extraction, and can be used during both task-based and rest experiments. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of different ICA-based procedures to monitor in real-time a target IC defined from a functional localizer which also used ICA. Four novel methods were implemented to monitor ongoing brain activity in a sliding window approach. The methods differed in the ways in which a priori information, derived from ICA algorithms, was used to monitor a target independent component (IC). We implemented four different algorithms, all based on ICA. One Back-projection method used ICA to derive static spatial information from the functional localizer, off-line, which was then back-projected dynamically during the real-time acquisition. The other three methods used real-time ICA algorithms that dynamically exploited temporal, spatial, or spatial-temporal priors during the real-time acquisition. The methods were evaluated by simulating a rt-fMRI experiment that used real fMRI data. The performance of each method was characterized by the spatial and/or temporal correlation with the target IC component monitored, computation time, and intrinsic stochastic variability of the algorithms. In this study the Back-projection method, which could monitor more than one IC of interest, outperformed the other methods. These results are consistent with a functional task that gives stable target ICs over time. The dynamic adaptation possibilities offered by the other ICA methods proposed may offer better performance than the Back-projection in conditions where the functional activation shows higher spatial and/or temporal variability.
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Reproducibility and biases in high field brain diffusion MRI: An evaluation of acquisition and analysis variables.
Magn Reson Imaging
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of in-vivo human brain provides insights into white matter anatomical connectivity, but little is known about measurement difference biases and reliability of data obtained with last generation high field scanners (>3T) as function of MRI acquisition and analyses variables. Here we assess the impact of acquisition (voxel size: 1.8×1.8×1.8, 2×2×2 and 2.5×2.5×2.5mm(3), b-value: 700, 1000 and 1300s/mm(2)) and analysis variables (within-session averaging and co-registration methods) on biases and test-retest reproducibility of some common tensor derived quantities like fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial and radial diffusivity in a group of healthy subjects at 4T in three regions: arcuate fasciculus, corpus callosum and cingulum. Averaging effects are also evaluated on a full-brain voxel based approach. The main results are: i) group FA and MD reproducibility errors across scan sessions are on average double of those found in within-session repetitions (?1.3 %), regardless of acquisition protocol and region; ii) within-session averaging of two DTI acquisitions does not improve reproducibility of any of the quantities across sessions at the group level, regardless of acquisition protocol; iii) increasing voxel size biased MD, axial and radial diffusivities to higher values and FA to lower values; iv) increasing b-value biased all quantities to lower values, axial diffusivity showing the strongest effects; v) the two co-registration methods evaluated gave similar bias and reproducibility results. Altogether these results show that reproducibility of FA and MD is comparable to that found at lower fields, not significantly dependent on pre-processing and acquisition protocol manipulations, but that the specific choice of acquisition parameters can significantly bias the group measures of FA, MD, axial and radial diffusivities.
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ICA analysis of fMRI with real-time constraints: an evaluation of fast detection performance as function of algorithms, parameters and a priori conditions.
Front Hum Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Independent component analysis (ICA) techniques offer a data-driven possibility to analyze brain functional MRI data in real-time. Typical ICA methods used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), however, have been until now mostly developed and optimized for the off-line case in which all data is available. Real-time experiments are ill-posed for ICA in that several constraints are added: limited data, limited analysis time and dynamic changes in the data and computational speed. Previous studies have shown that particular choices of ICA parameters can be used to monitor real-time fMRI (rt-fMRI) brain activation, but it is unknown how other choices would perform. In this rt-fMRI simulation study we investigate and compare the performance of 14 different publicly available ICA algorithms systematically sampling different growing window lengths (WLs), model order (MO) as well as a priori conditions (none, spatial or temporal). Performance is evaluated by computing the spatial and temporal correlation to a target component as well as computation time. Four algorithms are identified as best performing (constrained ICA, fastICA, amuse, and evd), with their corresponding parameter choices. Both spatial and temporal priors are found to provide equal or improved performances in similarity to the target compared with their off-line counterpart, with greatly reduced computation costs. This study suggests parameter choices that can be further investigated in a sliding-window approach for a rt-fMRI experiment.
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Functional and Developmental Significance of Amplitude Variance Asymmetry in the BOLD Resting-State Signal.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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It is known that the brains resting-state activity (RSA) is organized in low frequency oscillations that drive network connectivity. Recent research has also shown that elements of RSA described by high-frequency and nonoscillatory properties are non-random and functionally relevant. Motivated by this research, we investigated nonoscillatory aspects of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) RSA using a novel method for characterizing subtle fluctuation dynamics. The metric that we develop quantifies the relative variance of the amplitude of local-maxima and local-minima in a BOLD time course (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). This metric reveals new properties of RSA activity, without relying on connectivity as a descriptive tool. We applied the AVA analysis to data from 3 different participant groups (2 adults, 1 child) collected from 3 different centers. The analyses show that AVA patterns a) identify 3 types of RSA profiles in adults sensory systems b) differ in topology and pattern of dynamics in adults and children, and c) are stable across magnetic resonance scanners. Furthermore, children with higher IQ demonstrated more adult-like AVA patterns. These findings indicate that AVA reflects important and novel dimensions of brain development and RSA.
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Distinct neural substrates for semantic knowledge and naming in the temporoparietal network.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2011
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Patients with anterior temporal lobe (ATL) lesions show semantic and lexical retrieval deficits, and the differential role of this area in the 2 processes is debated. Functional neuroimaging in healthy individuals has not clarified the matter because semantic and lexical processes usually occur simultaneously and automatically. Furthermore, the ATL is a region challenging for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) due to susceptibility artifacts, especially at high fields. In this study, we established an optimized ATL-sensitive fMRI acquisition protocol at 4 T and applied an event-related paradigm to study the identification (i.e., association of semantic biographical information) of celebrities, with and without the ability to retrieve their proper names. While semantic processing reliably activated the ATL, only more posterior areas in the left temporal and temporal-parietal junction were significantly modulated by covert lexical retrieval. These results suggest that within a temporoparietal network, the ATL is relatively more important for semantic processing, and posterior language regions are relatively more important for lexical retrieval.
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Unconscious priming instructions modulate activity in default and executive networks of the human brain.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2011
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During task executions, brain activity increases in executive networks (ENs) and decreases in default-mode networks (DMNs). Here, we examined whether these large-scale network dynamics can be influenced by unconscious cognitive information processing. Volunteers saw instructions (cues) to respond either ipsilaterally or contralaterally to a subsequent lateralized target. Unbeknownst to them, each cue was preceded by a masked stimulus (prime), which could be identical (congruent), or opposite (incongruent) to the cue, or neutral (not an instruction). Behaviorally, incongruent primes interfered with performance, even though they were not consciously perceived. With functional magnetic resonance imaging, we individuated the anticorrelated ENs and DMNs involved during task execution. With effective connectivity analyses, we found that DMNs caused activity in ENs throughout the task. Unconscious interference during incongruent trials was associated with a specific activity increase in ENs and an activity drop in DMNs. Intersubject efficiency in performance during incongruent trials was correlated with functional connectivity between specific ENs and DMNs. These results indicate that unconscious instructions can prime activity in ENs and DMNs and suggest that the DMNs play a key role in unconscious monitoring of the environment in the service of efficient resource allocation for task execution.
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Mechanisms of rule acquisition and rule following in inductive reasoning.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
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Despite the recent interest in the neuroanatomy of inductive reasoning processes, the regional specificity within prefrontal cortex (PFC) for the different mechanisms involved in induction tasks remains to be determined. In this study, we used fMRI to investigate the contribution of PFC regions to rule acquisition (rule search and rule discovery) and rule following. Twenty-six healthy young adult participants were presented with a series of images of cards, each consisting of a set of circles numbered in sequence with one colored blue. Participants had to predict the position of the blue circle on the next card. The rules that had to be acquired pertained to the relationship among succeeding stimuli. Responses given by subjects were categorized in a series of phases either tapping rule acquisition (responses given up to and including rule discovery) or rule following (correct responses after rule acquisition). Mid-dorsolateral PFC (mid-DLPFC) was active during rule search and remained active until successful rule acquisition. By contrast, rule following was associated with activation in temporal, motor, and medial/anterior prefrontal cortex. Moreover, frontopolar cortex (FPC) was active throughout the rule acquisition and rule following phases before a rule became familiar. We attributed activation in mid-DLPFC to hypothesis generation and in FPC to integration of multiple separate inferences. The present study provides evidence that brain activation during inductive reasoning involves a complex network of frontal processes and that different subregions respond during rule acquisition and rule following phases.
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B0 mapping with multi-channel RF coils at high field.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2011
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Mapping the static magnetic field via the phase evolution over gradient echo scans acquired at two or more echo times is an established method. A number of possibilities exist, however, for combining phase data from multi-channel coils, denoising and thresholding field maps for high field applications. Three methods for combining phase images when no body/volume coil is available are tested: (i) Hermitian product, (ii) phase-matching over channels, and (iii) a new approach based on calculating separate field maps for each channel. The separate channel method is shown to yield field maps with higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Hermitian product and phase-matching methods and fewer unwrapping errors at low signal-to-noise ratio. Separate channel combination also allows unreliable voxels to be identified via the standard deviation over channels, which is found to be the most effective means of denoising field maps. Tests were performed using multichannel coils with between 8 and 32 channels at 3 T, 4 T, and 7 T. For application in the correction of distortions in echo-planar images, a formulation is proposed for reducing the local gradient of field maps to eliminate signal pile-up or swapping artifacts. Field maps calculated using these techniques, implemented in a freely available MATLAB toolbox, provide the basis for an effective correction for echo-planar imaging distortions at high fields.
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A neuronal basis for task-negative responses in the human brain.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2010
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Neuroimaging studies have revealed a number of brain regions that show a reduced blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during externally directed tasks compared with a resting baseline. These regions constitute a network whose operation has become known as the default mode. The source of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal reductions in the default mode during task performance has not been resolved, however. It may be attributable to neuronal effects (neuronal firing), physiological effects (e.g., task vs. rest differences in respiration rate), or even increases in neuronal activity with an atypical blood response. To establish the source of signal decreases in the default mode, we used the calibrated fMRI method to quantify changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in those regions that typically show reductions in BOLD signal during a demanding cognitive task. CBF:CMRO? coupling during task-negative responses were linear, with a coupling constant similar to that in task-positive regions, indicating a neuronal source for signal reductions in multiple brain areas. We also identify, for the first time, two modes of neuronal activity in this network; one in which greater deactivation (characterized by metabolic rate reductions) is associated with more effort and one where it is associated with less effort.
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ADJUST: An automatic EEG artifact detector based on the joint use of spatial and temporal features.
Psychophysiology
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2010
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Abstract A successful method for removing artifacts from electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings is Independent Component Analysis (ICA), but its implementation remains largely user-dependent. Here, we propose a completely automatic algorithm (ADJUST) that identifies artifacted independent components by combining stereotyped artifact-specific spatial and temporal features. Features were optimized to capture blinks, eye movements, and generic discontinuities on a feature selection dataset. Validation on a totally different EEG dataset shows that (1) ADJUSTs classification of independent components largely matches a manual one by experts (agreement on 95.2% of the data variance), and (2) Removal of the artifacted components detected by ADJUST leads to neat reconstruction of visual and auditory event-related potentials from heavily artifacted data. These results demonstrate that ADJUST provides a fast, efficient, and automatic way to use ICA for artifact removal.
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Collaborative computational anatomy: an MRI morphometry study of the human brain via diffeomorphic metric mapping.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2009
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This article describes a large multi-institutional analysis of the shape and structure of the human hippocampus in the aging brain as measured via MRI. The study was conducted on a population of 101 subjects including nondemented control subjects (n = 57) and subjects clinically diagnosed with Alzheimers Disease (AD, n = 38) or semantic dementia (n = 6) with imaging data collected at Washington University in St. Louis, hippocampal structure annotated at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and anatomical shapes embedded into a metric shape space using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) at the Johns Hopkins University. A global classifier was constructed for discriminating cohorts of nondemented and demented subjects based on linear discriminant analysis of dimensions derived from metric distances between anatomical shapes, demonstrating class conditional structure differences measured via LDDMM metric shape (P < 0.01). Localized analysis of the control and AD subjects only on the coordinates of the population template demonstrates shape changes in the subiculum and the CA1 subfield in AD (P < 0.05). Such large scale collaborative analysis of anatomical shapes has the potential to enhance the understanding of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders.
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A resting state network in the motor control circuit of the basal ganglia.
BMC Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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In the absence of overt stimuli, the brain shows correlated fluctuations in functionally related brain regions. Approximately ten largely independent resting state networks (RSNs) showing this behaviour have been documented to date. Recent studies have reported the existence of an RSN in the basal ganglia - albeit inconsistently and without the means to interpret its function. Using two large study groups with different resting state conditions and MR protocols, the reproducibility of the network across subjects, behavioural conditions and acquisition parameters is assessed. Independent Component Analysis (ICA), combined with novel analyses of temporal features, is applied to establish the basis of signal fluctuations in the network and its relation to other RSNs. Reference to prior probabilistic diffusion tractography work is used to identify the basal ganglia circuit to which these fluctuations correspond.
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MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
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Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in need for further validation with a larger dataset.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.