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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
[The effects of methylmercury on health in children and adults; national and international studies].
Nutr Hosp
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2014
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The benefit of fish consumption in children and adults is well-known. However, it has been pointed out that excessive methylmercury intake due to consumption of contaminated fish leads to neurological toxicity in children, affecting cognitive function, memory, visual-motor function and language. After the intoxications in Minamata and Iraq, wide-ranging epidemiological studies were carried out in New Zealand, the Faroe Islands and the Seychelles and international recommendations were established for fish consumption in pregnant women and small children. In Spain, the Childhood and Environmental project (INMA, its Spanish acronym) has studied the effects of diet and the environment on fetal and childhood development in different geographic areas of Spain. National and international sudies have demonstrated that mercury concentrations are mainly dependent on fish consumption, although there are variations among countries which can be explained not only by the levels of fish consumption, but also by the type or species of fish that is consumed, as well as other factors. Although the best documented adverse effects of methylmercury are the effects on nervous sytem development in fetuses and newborns, an increasing number of studies indicate that cognitive function, reproduction and, especially, cardiovascular risk in the adult population can also be affected. However, more studies are necessary in order to confirm this and establish the existance of a causal relationship.
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[Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].
Nutr Hosp
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2014
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Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability.
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A novel role of the potyviral helper component proteinase contributes to enhance the yield of viral particles.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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The helper component proteinase (HCPro) is an indispensable, multifunctional protein of members of the genus Potyvirus and other viruses of the family Potyviridae. This viral factor is directly involved in diverse steps of viral infection, such as aphid transmission, polyprotein processing, and suppression of host antiviral RNA silencing. In this paper, we show that although a chimeric virus based on the potyvirus Plum pox virus lacking HCPro, which was replaced by a heterologous silencing suppressor, caused an efficient infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, its viral progeny had very reduced infectivity. Making use of different approaches, here, we provide direct evidence of a previously unknown function of HCPro in which the viral factor enhances the stability of its cognate capsid protein (CP), positively affecting the yield of virions and consequently improving the infectivity of the viral progeny. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the ability of HCPro to stabilize CP and enhance the yield of infectious viral particles is not linked to any of its previously known activities and helped us to delimit the region of HCPro involved in this function in the central region of the protein. Moreover, the function is highly specific and cannot be fulfilled by the HCPro of a heterologous potyvirus. The importance of this novel requirement in regulating the sorting of the viral genome to be subjected to replication, translation, and encapsidation, thus contributing to the synchronization of these viral processes, is discussed.
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[A 35-year report of the study of group on gastrointestinal cancer in Mexico City: variations in frequency of different digestive tract neoplasms among different socioeconomic statuses].
Gac Med Mex
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Since the middle of the last century, North America and occidental countries have reported variations in the frequency of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Several environmental factors, mainly nutritional and dietary exposure, as well as habits have contributed to these changes. We have documented these changes in Mexico during the last 35 years.
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Diverse amino acid changes at specific positions in the N-terminal region of the coat protein allow Plum pox virus to adapt to new hosts.
Mol. Plant Microbe Interact.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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Plum pox virus (PPV)-D and PPV-R are two isolates from strain D of PPV that differ in host specificity. Previous analyses of chimeras originating from PPV-R and PPV-D suggested that the N terminus of the coat protein (CP) includes host-specific pathogenicity determinants. Here, these determinants were mapped precisely by analyzing the infectivity in herbaceous and woody species of chimeras containing a fragment of the 3 region of PPV-D (including the region coding for the CP) in a PPV-R backbone. These chimeras were not infectious in Prunus persica, but systemically infected Nicotiana clevelandii and N. benthamiana when specific amino acids were modified or deleted in a short 30-amino-acid region of the N terminus of the CP. Most of these mutations did not reduce PPV fitness in Prunus spp. although others impaired systemic infection in this host. We propose a model in which the N terminus of the CP, highly relevant for virus systemic movement, is targeted by a host defense mechanism in Nicotiana spp. Mutations in this short region allow PPV to overcome the defense response in this host but can compromise the efficiency of PPV systemic movement in other hosts such as Prunus spp.
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O-GlcNAc modification of the coat protein of the potyvirus Plum pox virus enhances viral infection.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2013
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O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic protein modification which has been studied mainly in metazoans. We reported previously that an Arabidopsis thaliana O-GlcNAc transferase modifies at least two threonine residues of the Plum pox virus (PPV) capsid protein (CP). Now, six additional residues were shown to be involved in O-GlcNAc modification of PPV CP. CP O-GlcNAcylation was abolished in the PPV CP7-T/A mutant, in which seven threonines were mutated. PPV CP7-T/A infected Nicotiana clevelandii, Nicotiana benthamiana, and Prunus persica without noticeable defects. However, defects in infection of A. thaliana were readily apparent. In mixed infections of wild-type arabidopsis, the CP7-T/A mutant was outcompeted by wild-type virus. These results indicate that CP O-GlcNAcylation has a major role in the infection process. O-GlcNAc modification may have a role in virion assembly and/or stability as the CP of PPV CP7-T/A was more sensitive to protease digestion than that of the wild-type virus.
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Hydrocarbons derived from petroleum in bottled drinking water from Mexico City.
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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This paper describes the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) derived from petroleum in bottled drinking water samples that were collected over 1 year from Mexico City in two bottle sizes (1.5 and 19 L), all brought in supermarkets. The analysis was by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. -Concentrations of AHs (9.26-1.74 ?g/L) were greater than PAHs (20.15-12.78 ng/L). Individual concentrations of PAHs such as fluoranthene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and benzo(ghi)perylene were comparable with data reported by the World Health Organization (WHO). Total concentrations of PAHs for all samples (BDW1: 12.78 ?g/L, BDW2: 16.72 ?g/L, BDW3: 14.62 ?g/L, BDW4: 20.15 ?g/L and BDW5: 13.23 ng/L) were below the maximum permissible European level of 100 ng/L; no regulations exist for AHs although their values were greater than PAHs (BDW1: 3.11 ?g/L, BDW2: 8.45 ?g/L, BDW3: 1.74 ?g/L, BDW4: 4.75 ?g/L and BDW5: 9.26 ?g/L).
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Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein serum levels as markers of infection in a pediatric population with febrile neutropenia and cancer.
Pediatr Hematol Oncol
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Procalcitonin and C-reactive-protein are inflammatory markers for sepsis. The authors evaluated their sensitivity and specificity in pediatric patients with cancer and febrile neutropenia.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.