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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: A tale of multiple outcomes.
Infect. Genet. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2013
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Globally, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 130 million people and 3 million new infections occur annually. HCV is also recognized as an important cause of chronic liver disease in children. The absence of proofreading properties of the HCV RNA polymerase leads to a highly error prone replication process, allowing HCV to escape host immune response. The adaptive nature of HCV evolution dictates the outcome of the disease in many ways. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of HCV in three unrelated children who acquired chronic HCV infection as a result of mother-to-child transmission, two of whom were also coinfected with HIV-1. The persistence of discrete HCV variants and their population structure were assessed using median joining network and Bayesian approaches. While patterns of viral evolution clearly differed between subjects, immune system dysfunction related to HIV coinfection or persistent HCV seronegativity stand as potential mechanisms to explain the lack of molecular evolution observed in these three cases. In contrast, treatment of HCV infection with PegIFN, which did not lead to sustained virologic responses in all 3 cases, was not associated with commensurate variations in the complexity of the variant spectrum. Finally, the differences in the degree of divergence suggest that the mode of transmission of the virus was not the main factor driving viral evolution.
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[An index internal diameter ductus arteriosus/body surface area as a need for closure of duct in the preterm newborn].
Rev. Invest. Clin.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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To determine a rate of internal diameter (ID), the narrowest, the ductus arteriosus (DA)/body surface area (BSA) in preterm newborns (PTNB) for need for closure of DA either medically or surgically.
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Specific detection of naturally occurring hepatitis C virus mutants with resistance to telaprevir and boceprevir (protease inhibitors) among treatment-naïve infected individuals.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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The use of telaprevir and boceprevir, both protease inhibitors (PI), as part of the specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (STAT-C) has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR) rates. However, different clinical studies have also identified several mutations associated with viral resistance to both PIs. In the absence of selective pressure, drug-resistant hepatitis C virus (HCV) mutants are generally present at low frequency, making mutation detection challenging. Here, we describe a mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR method for the specific detection of naturally occurring drug-resistant HCV mutants. MAMA PCR successfully identified the corresponding HCV variants, while conventional methods such as direct sequencing, endpoint limiting dilution (EPLD), and bacterial cloning were not sensitive enough to detect circulating drug-resistant mutants in clinical specimens. Ultradeep pyrosequencing was used to confirm the presence of the corresponding HCV mutants. In treatment-naïve patients, the frequency of all resistant variants was below 1%. Deep amplicon sequencing allowed a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population among these patients, showing that the evolution of the NS3 is limited to a rather small sequence space. Monitoring of HCV drug resistance before and during treatment is likely to provide important information for management of patients undergoing anti-HCV therapy.
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Molecular epidemiology of autochthonous dengue virus strains circulating in Mexico.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important arthropod-borne viral infection in humans. Here, the genetic relatedness among autochthonous DENV Mexican isolates was assessed. Phylogenetic and median-joining network analyses showed that viral strains recovered from different geographic locations are genetically related and relatively homogeneous, exhibiting limited nucleotide diversity.
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Interleukin-28B genotyping by melt-mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12979860 and rs8099917, a useful tool for prediction of therapy response in hepatitis C patients.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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Several studies have identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring near the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene and response to antiviral treatment among hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Here, we describe a reliable melt-mismatch amplification mutation assay (melt-MAMA) PCR-based genotyping method for IL-28B which can be used in the management of HCV patients, helping to better define the course of therapy.
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[Percutaneous closure of inter-atrial communication with the Amplatzer device. Experience with 42 cases].
Arch Cardiol Mex
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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We report our experience on 42 patients treated with atrial septal defect (ASD) occlusion using Amplatzer device. Thirty patients were females and 12 were males, mean ages 26.5-years-old +/- 12 years (interval from 7 to 69 years). Average weight was 57.1 +/- 13.8 kg (32.3-85.0 kg). Forty-two devices (ranging diameters from 13 mm to 40 mm) were deployed, 40 of which were placed successfully and attempts were unsuccessful in two cases (diameter devices 36 mm and 40 mm, respectively). We used the "balloon on the left or right upper pulmonary vein" in 5 patients, achieving good deployment. Echocardiography showed total occlusion in 37 patients (93.5%), trivial leak in 2 (4.7%), and light leak in 1 patient (2.3%). Follow up was at 1 to 12 months (mean 6.5). Total occlusion was observed at one month on both patients with trivial leak, and at 6 months on the patient with light leak. Failure to deploy the device appropriately on the two patients with unsuccessful result was due to unfavorable anatomy: very large defects in both cases (occluder size 36 mm and 40 mm), very thin postero-superior 6 mm rim on one of them and aortic rim absence on the other one. Stretched diameters were 34 mm and 38 mm on patients with 36 mm and 40 mm devices, respectively. Both of them were sent to surgery. We conclude that percutaneus closure of atrial septal defect with the Amplatzer device is a save and have good results.
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Rapid hepatitis C virus divergence among chronically infected individuals.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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Here, we analyze the viral divergence among hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic cases infected with genotype 1. The intrahost viral evolution was assessed by deep sequencing using the 454 Genome Sequencer platform. The results showed a rapid nucleotide sequence divergence. This notorious short-term viral evolution is of the utmost importance for the study of HCV transmission, because direct links between related samples were virtually lost. Thus, rapid divergence of HCV significantly affects genetic relatedness studies and outbreak investigations.
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Identification of hepatitis C virus transmission using a next-generation sequencing approach.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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Here, we describe a transmission event of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among injection drug users. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to assess the intrahost viral genetic variation. Deep amplicon sequencing of HCV hypervariable region 1 allowed for a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population. Establishment of the genetic relatedness between cases was accomplished by phylogenetic analysis. NGS is a powerful tool with applications in molecular epidemiology studies and outbreak investigations.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.