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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Predicting anticoagulant-related bleeding in patients with venous thromboembolism: a clinically oriented review.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2014
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Diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) requires prompt treatment with anticoagulants in therapeutic doses. Since these drugs are associated with the occurrence of haemorrhage, identification of patients at increased risk of major bleeding is of utmost clinical importance for defining the optimal treatment regimen and duration of anticoagulation. Current suggested prediction scores for bleeding risk in VTE patients have been derived from observational studies of moderate quality, or from patients with various indications for therapeutic anticoagulation other than VTE. To date, none of the scores have been adequately validated in cohorts that underwent dedicated monitoring and independent adjudication of bleeding complications. In addition, while the scarce available evidence has focused on patients treated with heparins and/or vitamin K antagonists, risk stratification scores for bleeding complications in VTE patients treated with non-vitamin K dependent anticoagulants have not yet been developed. This clinically oriented review covers the incidence and risk factors of anticoagulation-related bleeding in VTE patients treated with different anticoagulant drugs as well as the available bleeding-prediction scores. Further, we attempt to provide guidance for bleeding-prevention in clinical practice and speculate on developments in the near future that may fundamentally change our current thinking on VTE management.
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A randomized comparison of 1-h sodium bicarbonate hydration versus standard peri-procedural saline hydration in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing intravenous contrast-enhanced computerized tomography.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2014
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Guidelines recommend saline hydration for prophylaxis of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing intravenous contrast media-enhanced CT (CE-CT). The safety and efficacy of a brief hydration protocol using sodium bicarbonate in this population is unknown. We analysed whether 1-h sodium bicarbonate hydration prior to CE-CT is non-inferior to saline hydration prior to and after CE-CT in CKD patients.
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Risk of acute kidney injury after percutaneous coronary interventions using radial versus femoral vascular access: insights from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium.
Circ Cardiovasc Interv
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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Transradial percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI [TRI]) does not involve catheter manipulation in the descending aorta, whereas transfemoral PCI (TFI) does. Therefore, the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after PCI might be influenced by vascular access site. We compared risks of AKI and nephropathy requiring dialysis (NRD) among patients treated with TRI and TFI.
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Diagnostic outcome management study in patients with clinically suspected recurrent acute pulmonary embolism with a structured algorithm.
Thromb. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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The value of diagnostic strategies in patients with clinically suspected recurrent pulmonary embolism (PE) has not been established. The aim was to determine the safety of a simple diagnostic strategy using the Wells clinical decision rule (CDR), quantitative D-dimer testing and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with clinically suspected acute recurrent PE.
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Efficacy and safety of vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) for atrial fibrillation in non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Essential information regarding efficacy and safety of vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) in non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still lacking in current literature. The aim of our study was to compare the risks of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and major bleeds between patients without CKD (eGFR >60 ml/min), and those with moderate (eGFR 30-60 ml/min), or severe non-dialysis dependent CKD (eGFR <30 ml/min).
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A random forest based risk model for reliable and accurate prediction of receipt of transfusion in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Transfusion is a common complication of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) and is associated with adverse short and long term outcomes. There is no risk model for identifying patients most likely to receive transfusion after PCI. The objective of our study was to develop and validate a tool for predicting receipt of blood transfusion in patients undergoing contemporary PCI.
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The association between contrast dose and renal complications post PCI across the continuum of procedural estimated risk.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Prior studies have proposed to restrict the contrast volume (CV) to <3x calculated creatinine clearance (CCC), to prevent contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) post percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). The predictive value of this algorithm for CIN and therefore the benefit of this approach in high risk patients has been questioned. The aim of our study was to assess the association between contrast dose and the occurrence of CIN in patients at varying predicted risks of CIN and baseline CCC following contemporary PCI.
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New anticoagulants in the treatment of patients with cancer-associated venous thromboembolism.
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2013
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Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a common source of morbidity and mortality among patients with malignant disease. In this specific setting, the treatment of VTE is challenging as cancer patients display a high tendency to develop recurrent VTE, as well as anticoagulant-related bleeding complications. Low-molecular-weight heparins have been demonstrated to be more effective in the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE in cancer patients compared with conventional treatment with vitamin K antagonists. A limitation of this therapeutic approach includes the long-term requirement of daily subcutaneous injections, which may be burdensome to patients. Over the past decade, several novel oral anticoagulants have emerged, which can be administered in fixed doses without the need for monitoring. Clinical trials evaluating these agents for treatment in the general VTE population yielded promising results. This review summarizes the current management of cancer-associated VTE, overviews the trials that investigated the novel anticoagulant drugs for the treatment of acute VTE and discusses the potential of these novel agents for use in cancer patients.
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[Prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy: time for nuance and a new guideline].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is defined as an increase in serum creatinine following intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media. Patients with pre-existing kidney disease therefore receive intravenous periprocedural hydration, as recommended by guidelines. The costs for preventive hydration are high, EUR 56.6 million annually in the Netherlands alone. However, evidence on the efficacy of this preventive measure is scarce. There are only two randomized placebo-controlled trials on the efficacy of hydration. Hard evidence proving a causal relationship between CIN and morbidity or mortality is lacking, although some associations have been found. In the vast majority of CIN patients, renal function recovers within weeks or months. Research is needed to study whether patients with mild chronic kidney disease truly benefit from preventive hydration.
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Contrast-induced acute kidney injury and clinical outcomes after intra-arterial and intravenous contrast administration: risk comparison adjusted for patient characteristics by design.
Am. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2013
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Direct comparisons between risk of contrast induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after intra-arterial versus intravenous contrast administration are scarce. We estimated and compared the risk of CI-AKI and its clinical course after both modes of contrast administration in patients who underwent both.
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A novel tool for reliable and accurate prediction of renal complications in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.
J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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The aim of the study was to develop and validate a tool for predicting risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients undergoing contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
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Meta-analysis: serum creatinine changes following contrast enhanced CT imaging.
Eur J Radiol
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2011
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Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is defined as a decrease in renal function following administration of contrast media. The aim of this meta-analysis was to asses the overall risk of CIN, chronic loss of kidney function and the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) after intravenous contrast enhanced CT-scan. Secondly, we aimed to identify subgroups at increased risk for CIN.
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D-dimer testing in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and impaired renal function.
Am. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Determination of pretest probability and D-dimer tests are the first diagnostic steps in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, which can be ruled out when clinical probability is unlikely and D-dimer level is normal. We evaluated the utility of D-dimer testing in patients with impaired renal function.
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Outpatient versus inpatient treatment in patients with pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis.
Eur. Respir. J.
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Our aim was to study the safety of outpatient treatment in low risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism compared with inpatient treatment, the current clinical standard. We searched Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and EMBASE databases and included studies on outpatient treatment of pulmonary embolism. The outcomes were 3-month recurrent venous thromboembolism, major bleeding and all-cause mortality. We identified 13 studies (1657 patients) with outpatients (discharge <24 h), three studies (256 patients) with early discharge patients (discharged within 72 h) and five studies (383 patients) with inpatients. The pooled incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism was 1.7% (95% CI 0.92-3.1%) in outpatients, 1.1% (0.22-5.4%) in patients discharged early and 1.2% (0.16-8.1%) in inpatients. The pooled incidence of major bleeding was 0.97% (0.58-1.6%) in outpatients, 0.78% (0.16-3.7%) in early discharge patients and 1.0% (0.39-2.8%) in inpatients. The pooled incidence of mortality was 1.9% (0.79-4.6%) in outpatients, 2.3% (1.1-5.1%) in early discharge patients and 0.74% (0.04-11%) in inpatients. Incidences of recurrent venous thromboembolism, major bleeding and, after correction for malignancies, mortality were comparable between outpatients, patients discharged early and inpatients. We conclude that home treatment or early discharge of selected low-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is as safe as inpatient treatment.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.