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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Acute coronary syndrome in the young: clinical characteristics, risk factors and prognosis.
Open Cardiovasc Med J
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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To describe the characteristics of patients ?40 years of age hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome, analyze the risk factors and identify the variables associated with prognosis.
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Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the slag from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc.
J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) for nickel, cadmium, zinc and manganese compounds present in a pile of slag accumulated under exposure to weathering. This slag was generated by a metallurgical industry that produced zinc and zinc alloys from hemimorphite (Zn(4)(OH)(2)Si(2)O(7).H(2)O) and willemite (Zn(2)SiO(4)) minerals. A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters and Gambles solution was used as the simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the slag samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). There are significant differences in terms of solubility parameters among the metals. The results indicated that the zinc, nickel, cadmium and manganese compounds present in the slag were moderately soluble in the SLF. The rapid dissolution fractions of these metals are associated with their sulfates. In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the slag.
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Recovery of platinum, tin and indium from spent catalysts in chloride medium using strong basic anion exchange resins.
J. Hazard. Mater.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2011
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This work describes a route for platinum recovery from spent commercial Pt and PtSnIn/Al(2)O(3) catalysts using strong basic mesoporous and macroporous anion exchange resins (Cl(-) form). The catalysts were leached with aqua regia (75 °C, 20-25 min). Platinum adsorption was influenced by the presence of other metals which form chlorocomplexes (tin, indium) and also base metals (aluminum). However, it was possible to overcome this fact by a sequential desorption procedure. Aluminum was selectively removed from the resins by elution with 3 mol L(-1) HCl. Platinum was desorbed passing 1 mol L(-1) Na(2)S(2)O(3) (pH 9). Tin was removed by elution with 0.1 mol L(-1) ascorbic acid. Indium was removed using 0.1 mol L(-1) EDTA as eluent. Desorption efficiency exceeded 99% for all metals. Metals were recovered in high yields (>98 wt%).
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Processing of spent platinum-based catalysts via fusion with potassium hydrogenosulfate.
J. Hazard. Mater.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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This work describes a route for processing spent platinum-based commercial catalysts (Pt and PtSnIn/Al(2)O(3)) via fusion with potassium hydrogenosulfate (KHSO(4)). Samples were previously ground. The optimized experimental parameters were: temperature, 450°C; time, 3h; sample/flux mass ratio, 1/10. The fused mass was dissolved in water and the elements present were isolated by a multi-step separation procedure. Platinum was recovered as the only water-insoluble residue. About 45 wt% of aluminium was recovered as KAl(SO(4))(2)·12H(2)O (alum), whereas the remaining element was recovered as Al(OH)(3). Tin and indium were recovered together as sulfides at pH 1. About 72 wt% of potassium was recovered as K(2)SO(4) when the final effluent was treated with sulfuric acid (pH 1) and slowly evaporated. Generation of final wastes was greatly reduced. More than 98 wt% of the elements present in the catalysts examined was recovered.
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Recovery of platinum from spent catalysts by liquid-liquid extraction in chloride medium.
J. Hazard. Mater.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
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This work examines a hydrometallurgical route for processing spent commercial catalysts (Pt and PtSnIn/A(2)O(3)) used in Brazilian refineries for recovery of the noble metal with less final wastes generation. Samples were initially pre-oxidized (500 degrees C, 5 h) in order to eliminate coke. The basis of the present route is the partial dissolution of the pre-oxidized catalyst in aqua-regia. Temperature and time necessary to dissolve all platinum were optimized in order to reduce the operation severity and aluminum solubilization. All platinum and 16-18 wt.% of aluminum were dissolved at 75 degrees C in 20-25 min. Separation of platinum from the acidic solution was accomplished by solvent extraction. The best extractant (> 99 wt.%) was Aliquat 336 (a quaternary ammonium salt) in one stage (A/O phase ratio = 1, v/v). Platinum was stripped (> 99.9 wt.%) in one stage (A/O phase ratio = 1, v/v) with aqueous sodium thiosulfate (> or = 0.75 mol L(-1)). Black platinum was obtained from this solution via reduction with magnesium or ascorbic acid.
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Removal of ammonium ion from produced waters in petroleum offshore exploitation by a batch single-stage electrolytic process.
J. Hazard. Mater.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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This work describes a batch single-stage electrochemical process to remove quantitatively the ammonium ion from produced waters from petroleum exploration of the Campos Basin, seeking to fulfil the directories of the National Brazilian Environmental Council. The anode was made out of titanium covered by a layer of RuO(2)+TiO(2) oxides (Dimensionally Stable Anode), whereas the cathode was made out of pure titanium. Anodic and cathodic compartments were separated by a membrane. The applied current varied from 0.3 to 1.5A. As the current increased NH(4)(+) removal was faster and pH was rapidly decreased to 3. The pH of the anodic compartment increased to approximately 10. When the current was 0.92 A chlorine evolution was observed after 40 min or only 15 min when that current was 1.50 A. In this voltage a deposit containing alkali-earth metal hydroxides/sulphates was formed on the membrane surface of the cathode side, thus suggesting a diffusion process from the anodic to the cathodic compartment. The maximum current applied to the cell must not exceed approximately 0.70 A in order to avoid chlorine evolution. Ammonia removal was over 99.9 wt% at 0.68 A in about 75 min.
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Changes in subtidal assemblages in a scenario of warming: proliferations of ephemeral benthic algae in the Canary Islands (eastern Atlantic Ocean).
Mar. Environ. Res.
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The present work analysed the main changes in subtidal algal assemblages in the last decade in an oceanic archipelago (Canary Islands--eastern Atlantic Ocean). Changes result from increases in cover of ephemeral benthic algae, such as the non-native chlorophyte Pseudotetraspora marina and the native cyanophytes Blennothrix lyngbyacea, Schizothrix calcicola and Schizothrix mexicana. Ephemeral algae overgrow subtidal assemblages which are extensively dominated by Lobophora variegata, but competitively do not exclude other species. Increases in the abundance of species coincided with a warming of about 2 °C in surface seawater temperature (SST) linked to the weakening of the Cold Canary Current and the Northwestern African upwelling. Shifts in the distribution and cover of ephemeral species follow the SST gradient from warmer waters in the western islands to colder waters in the eastern ones. While in the warmest western islands, species have spread quickly colonizing all type of substrates in just a few years (2005-2008), the occurrence of ephemerals towards the coldest eastern islands is yet inconspicuous.
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Contrasting geographical distributions as a result of thermal tolerance and long-distance dispersal in two allegedly widespread tropical brown algae.
PLoS ONE
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Many tropical marine macroalgae are reported from all three ocean basins, though these very wide distributions may simply be an artifact resulting from inadequate taxonomy that fails to take into account cryptic diversity. Alternatively, pantropical distributions challenge the belief of limited intrinsic dispersal capacity of marine seaweeds and the effectiveness of the north-south oriented continents as dispersal barriers. We aimed to re-assess the distribution of two allegedly circumtropical brown algae, Dictyota ciliolata and D. crenulata, and interpret the realized geographical range of the respective species in relation to their thermal tolerance and major tectonic and climatic events during the Cenozoic.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.