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Steady-state inhibition model for the biodegradation of sulfonated amines in a packed bed reactor.
N Biotechnol
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2014
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Aromatic amines are important industrial products having in their molecular structure one or more aromatic rings. These are used as precursors for the synthesis of dyes, adhesives, pesticides, rubber, fertilizers and surfactants. The aromatic amines are common constituents of industrial effluents, generated mostly by the degradation of azo dyes. Several of them are a threat to human health because they can by toxic, allergenic, mutagenic or carcinogenic. The most common are benzenesulfonic amines, such as 4-ABS (4-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) and naphthalene sulfonic amines, such as 4-ANS (4-amino naphthalene sulfonic acid). Sometimes, the mixtures of toxic compounds are more toxic or inhibitory than the individual compounds, even for microorganisms capable of degrading them. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the degradation of the mixture 4-ANS plus 4-ABS by a bacterial community immobilized in fragments of volcanic stone, using a packed bed continuous reactor. In this reactor, the amines loading rates were varied from 5.5 up to 69mgL(-1)h(-1). The removal of the amines was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and chemical oxygen demand. With this information, we have studied the substrate inhibition of the removal rate of the aromatic amines during the degradation of the mixture of sulfonated aromatic amines by the immobilized microorganisms. Experimental results were fitted to parabolic, hyperbolic and linear inhibition models. The model that best characterizes the inhibition of the specific degradation rate in the biofilm reactor was a parabolic model with values of RXM=58.15±7.95mg (10(9)cellsh)(-1), Ks=0.73±0.31mgL(-1), Sm=89.14±5.43mgL(-1) and the exponent m=5. From the microbial community obtained, six cultivable bacterial strains were isolated and identified by sequencing their 16S rDNA genes. The strains belong to the genera Variovorax, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Nocardioides and Microbacterium. This microbial consortium could use the mixture of aromatic amines as sources of carbon, nitrogen, energy and sulfur.
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Biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity as crucial components of biorefinery of organic wastes: a review.
Waste Manag Res
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Biohydrogen is a sustainable form of energy as it can be produced from organic waste through fermentation processes involving dark fermentation and photofermentation. Very often biohydrogen is included as a part of biorefinery approaches, which reclaim organic wastes that are abundant sources of renewable and low cost substrate that can be efficiently fermented by microorganisms. The aim of this work was to critically assess selected bioenergy alternatives from organic solid waste, such as biohydrogen and bioelectricity, to evaluate their relative advantages and disadvantages in the context of biorefineries, and ?nally to indicate the trends for future research and development. Biorefining is the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products, which means: energy, materials, chemicals, food and feed. Dark fermentation of organic wastes could be the beach-head of complete biorefineries that generate biohydrogen as a first step and could significantly influence the future of solid waste management. Series systems show a better efficiency than one-stage process regarding substrate conversion to hydrogen and bioenergy. The dark fermentation also produces fermented by-products (fatty acids and solvents), so there is an opportunity for further combining with other processes that yield more bioenergy. Photoheterotrophic fermentation is one of them: photosynthetic heterotrophs, such as non-sulfur purple bacteria, can thrive on the simple organic substances produced in dark fermentation and light, to give more H2. Effluents from photoheterotrophic fermentation and digestates can be processed in microbial fuel cells for bioelectricity production and methanogenic digestion for methane generation, thus integrating a diverse block of bioenergies. Several digestates from bioenergies could be used for bioproducts generation, such as cellulolytic enzymes and saccharification processes, leading to ethanol fermentation (another bioenergy), thus completing the inverse cascade. Finally, biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity could contribute to significant improvements for solid organic waste management in agricultural regions, as well as in urban areas.
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Evaluating the degradation of the herbicides picloram and 2,4-D in a compartmentalized reactive biobarrier with internal liquid recirculation.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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Tordon is a widely used herbicide formulation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and it is considered a toxic herbicide. The purposes of this work were to assess the feasibility of a microbial consortium inoculated in a lab-scale compartmentalized biobarrier, to remove these herbicides, and isolate, identify, and evaluate their predominant microbial constituents. Volumetric loading rates of herbicides ranging from 31.2 to 143.9 g m(-3) day(-1), for 2,4-D, and 12.8 to 59.3 g m(-3) day(-1) for picloram were probed; however, the top operational limit of the biobarrier, detected by a decay in the removal efficiency, was not reached. At the highest loading rates probed, high average removal efficiencies of 2,4-D, 99.56?±?0.44; picloram, 94.58?±?2.62; and chemical oxygen demand (COD), 89.42?±?3.68, were obtained. It was found that the lab-scale biofilm reactor efficiently removed both herbicides at dilution rates ranging from 0.92 to 4.23 day(-1), corresponding to hydraulic retention times from 1.087 to 0.236 days. On the other hand, few microbial strains able to degrade picloram are reported in the literature. In this work, three of the nine bacterial strains isolated cometabolically degrade picloram. They were identified as Hydrocarboniphaga sp., Tsukamurella sp., and Cupriavidus sp.
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Effect of herbicide adjuvants on the biodegradation rate of the methylthiotriazine herbicide prometryn.
Biodegradation
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2013
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A microbial community, selected by its ability to degrade triazinic herbicides was acclimatized by successive transfers in batch cultures. Initially, its ability to degrade prometryn, was evaluated using free cells or cells attached to fragments of a porous support. As carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources, prometryn, (98.8 % purity), or Gesagard, a herbicide formulation containing 44.5 % prometryn and 65.5 % of adjuvants, were used. In batch cultures, a considerable delay in the degradation of prometryn, presumptively caused by the elevated concentration of inhibitory adjuvants, occurred. When pure prometryn was used, volumetric removal rates remarkably higher than those obtained with the herbicide formulation were estimated by fitting the raw experimental data to sigmoidal decay models, and differentiating them. When the microbial consortium was immobilized in a continuously operated biofilm reactor, the negative effect of adjuvants on the rate and removal efficiency of prometryn could not be detected. Using the herbicide formulation, the consortium showed volumetric removal rates greater than 20 g m(-3) h(-1), with prometryn removal efficiencies of 100 %. The predominant bacterial strains isolated from the microbial consortium were Microbacterium sp., Enterobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., and Flavobacterium sp. Finally, by comparison of the prometryn removal rates with others reported in the literature, it can be concluded that the use of microbial consortia immobilized in a biofilm reactor operated in continuous regime offer better results than batch cultures of pure microbial strains.
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Biodegradation of a mixture of the herbicides ametryn, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in a compartmentalized biofilm reactor.
Bioresour. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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In this work, an efficient degradation process for the removal of 2,4-D and ametryn, together with organic and inorganic adjuvants used in the commercial formulations of both herbicides, was developed. Although both compounds are toxic for microbial communities, ametryn is markedly more toxic than 2,4-D. In spite of this, the microbial consortium used could resist loading rates up to 31.5 mg L(-1) d(-1) of ametryn, with removal efficiencies up to 97% for both herbicides. Thus, an alternative use of this consortium could be bioaugmentation, as a tool to protect the structure and function of an activated-sludge biota against ametryn or 2,4-D shock loads. The process was carried out in a lab-scale prototype of aerobic biobarrier constructed as a compartmentalized fixed film reactor with airlift recirculation of oxygenated liquid.
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Treatment of mezcal vinasses: a review.
J. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2011
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Mexican distilleries produce near eight million liters of mezcal per year, and generate about 90 million liters of mezcal vinasses (MV). This acidic liquid waste is very aggressive to the environment because of its high content of toxic and recalcitrant organic matter. As a result, treatment is necessary before discharge to water bodies. It is interesting, yet disturbing; verify that there is a significant gap on the treatment of MV. However, there is an abundant body of research on treatment of other recalcitrant toxic effluents that bear some similarity to MV, for example, wine vinasse, vinasses from the sugar industry, olive oil, and industrial pulp and paper wastewaters. The objective of this review is to critically organize the treatment alternatives of MV, assess their relative advantages and disadvantages, and finally detect the trends for future research and development. Experience with treatment of this set of residuals, indicates the following trends: (i) anaerobic digestion, complemented by oxidative chemical treatments (e.g. ozonation) are usually placed as pretreatments, (ii) aerobic treatment alone and combined with ozone which have been directed to remove phenolic compounds and color have been successfully applied, (iii) physico-chemical treatments such as Fenton, electro-oxidation, oxidants and so on., which are now mostly at lab scale stage, have demonstrated a significant removal of recalcitrant organic compounds, (iv) fungal pretreatment with chemical treatment followed by oxidative (O(3)) or anaerobic digestion, this combination seems to give attractive results, (v) vinasses can be co-composted with solid organic wastes, particularly with those from agricultural activities and agro-industies; in addition to soil amenders with fertilizing value to improve soil quality in typical arid lands where agave is cultivated, it seems to be a low cost technology very well suited for rural regions in underdeveloped countries where more sophisticated technologies are difficult to adopt, due to high costs and requirements of skilled personnel.
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Aerobic biodegradation of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye by a bacterial community immobilized in a multistage packed-bed BAC reactor.
Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2010
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A microbial community able to aerobically degrade the azo dye Acid Orange 7 was selected from riparian or lacustrine sediments collected at sites receiving textile wastewaters. Three bacterial strains, pertaining to the genera Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Rhizobium, constitute the selected community. The biodegradation of AO7 was carried out in batch-suspended cell culture and in a continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor. The rapid decolorization observed in batch culture, joined to a delay of about 24 h in COD removal and cell growth, suggests that enzymes involved in biodegradation of the aromatic amines generated after AO7 azo-bond cleavage (1-amino-2-naphthol [1-A2N] and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid [4-ABS]), are inducible in this microbial consortium. After this presumptive induction period, the accumulated byproducts, measured through COD, were partially metabolized and transformed in cell mass. At all azo dye loading rates used, complete removal of AO7 and 1-A2N was obtained in the multistage packed-bed BAC reactor (PBR).; however, the overall COD (eta ( COD )) and 4-ABS (eta ( ABS )) removal efficiencies obtained in steady state continuous culture were about 90%. Considering the toxicity of 1-A2N, its complete removal has particular relevance. In the first stages of the packed-bed BAC reactor (Fig. 4a-c), major removal was observed. In the last stage, only a slight removal of COD and 4-ABS was obtained. Comparing to several reported studies, the continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor showed similar or superior results. In addition, the operation of large-packed-bed BAC reactors could be improved by using several shallow BAC bed stages, because the pressure drop caused by bed compaction of a support material constituted by small and fragile particles can be reduced.
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Biodegradation of the herbicide propanil, and its 3,4-dichloroaniline by-product in a continuously operated biofilm reactor.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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The persistence of propanil in soil and aquatic environments along with the possible accumulation of toxic degradation products, such as chloroanilines, is of environmental concern. In this work, a continuous small-scale bioprocess to degrade the herbicide propanil, its main catabolic by-product, 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA), and the herbicide adjuvants is carried out. A microbial consortium, constituted by nine bacterial genera, was selected. The isolated strains, identified by amplification and sequencing of their 16S rDNA, were: Acidovorax sp., Luteibacter (rhizovicinus), Xanthomonas sp., Flavobacterium sp., Variovorax sp., Acinetobacter (calcoaceticus), Pseudomonas sp., Rhodococcus sp., and Kocuria sp. The ability of the microbial consortium to degrade the herbicide was evaluated in a biofilm reactor at propanil loading rates ranging from 1.9 to 36.8 mg L(-1) h(-1). Complete removal of propanil, 3,4-DCA, chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon was obtained at propanil loading rates up to 24.9 mg L(-1) h(-1). At higher loading rates, the removal efficiencies decayed. Four of the identified strains could grow individually in propanil, and 3,4-DCA: Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Rhodococcus sp., and Xanthomonas sp. The Kokuria strain grew on 3,4-DCA, but not on propanil. The first three bacteria have been related to biodegradation of phenyl urea herbicides or chlorinated anilines. Although some strains of the genera Xanthomonas and Kocuria have a role in the biodegradation of several xenobiotic compounds, as far as we know, there are no reports about degradation of propanil by Xanthomonas or 3,4-DCA by Kocuria species.
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