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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Estimation of the probability of exposure to machining fluids in a population-based case-control study.
J Occup Environ Hyg
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2014
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We describe an approach for estimating the probability that study subjects were exposed to metalworking fluids (MWFs) in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer. Study subject reports on the frequency of machining and use of specific MWFs (straight, soluble, and synthetic/semi-synthetic) were used to estimate exposure probability when available. Those reports also were used to develop estimates for job groups, which were then applied to jobs without MWF reports. Estimates using both cases and controls and controls only were developed. The prevalence of machining varied substantially across job groups (0.1->0.9%), with the greatest percentage of jobs that machined being reported by machinists and tool and die workers. Reports of straight and soluble MWF use were fairly consistent across job groups (generally 50-70%). Synthetic MWF use was lower (13-45%). There was little difference in reports by cases and controls vs. controls only. Approximately, 1% of the entire study population was assessed as definitely exposed to straight or soluble fluids in contrast to 0.2% definitely exposed to synthetic/semi-synthetics. A comparison between the reported use of the MWFs and U.S. production levels found high correlations (r generally >0.7). Overall, the method described here is likely to have provided a systematic and reliable ranking that better reflects the variability of exposure to three types of MWFs than approaches applied in the past. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resources: a list of keywords in the occupational histories that were used to link study subjects to the metalworking fluids (MWFs) modules; recommendations from the literature on selection of MWFs based on type of machining operation, the metal being machined and decade; popular additives to MWFs; the number and proportion of controls who reported various MWF responses by job group; the number and proportion of controls assigned to the MWF types by job group and exposure category; and the distribution of cases and controls assigned various levels of probability by MWF type.].
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0118?Lifetime Occupational Exposure to Diesel Exhaust and Bladder Cancer among Men in New England.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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We examined the association between lifetime occupational diesel engine exhaust (DEE) exposure and risk of bladder cancer in 1171 cases and 1418 controls in a population-based case-control study.
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0084?A Case-Control Study of Occupational Exposure to Metalworking Fluids and Bladder Cancer Risk among Men.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Metalworking has been associated with bladder cancer risk in many studies. Metalworking fluids (MWFs) are suspected as the putative exposure, but epidemiologic data are limited. Based on state-of-the-art, quantitative exposure assessment, we examined MWF exposure and bladder cancer risk in the New England Bladder Cancer Study.
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A case-control study of occupational exposure to metalworking fluids and bladder cancer risk among men.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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Metalworking has been associated with an excess risk of bladder cancer in over 20 studies. Metalworking fluids (MWFs) are suspected as the responsible exposure, but epidemiological data are limited. We investigated this association among men in the New England Bladder Cancer Study using state-of-the-art, quantitative exposure assessment methods.
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Identifying gender differences in reported occupational information from three US population-based case-control studies.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2014
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Growing evidence suggests that gender-blind assessment of exposure may introduce exposure misclassification, but few studies have characterised gender differences across occupations and industries. We pooled control responses to job-specific, industry-specific and exposure-specific questionnaires (modules) that asked detailed questions about work activities from three US population-based case-control studies to examine gender differences in work tasks and their frequencies.
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Genome-wide interaction study of smoking and bladder cancer risk.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2014
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Bladder cancer is a complex disease with known environmental and genetic risk factors. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWAS) of smoking and bladder cancer risk based on primary scan data from 3002 cases and 4411 controls from the National Cancer Institute Bladder Cancer GWAS. Alternative methods were used to evaluate both additive and multiplicative interactions between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and smoking exposure. SNPs with interaction P values < 5 × 10(-) (5) were evaluated further in an independent dataset of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls. We identified 10 SNPs that showed association in a consistent manner with the initial dataset and in the combined dataset, providing evidence of interaction with tobacco use. Further, two of these novel SNPs showed strong evidence of association with bladder cancer in tobacco use subgroups that approached genome-wide significance. Specifically, rs1711973 (FOXF2) on 6p25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for never smokers [combined odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.20-1.50, P value = 5.18 × 10(-) (7)]; and rs12216499 (RSPH3-TAGAP-EZR) on 6q25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for ever smokers (combined OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.67-0.84, P value = 6.35 × 10(-) (7)). In our analysis of smoking and bladder cancer, the tests for multiplicative interaction seemed to more commonly identify susceptibility loci with associations in never smokers, whereas the additive interaction analysis identified more loci with associations among smokers-including the known smoking and NAT2 acetylation interaction. Our findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for tobacco and bladder cancer.
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Developing estimates of frequency and intensity of exposure to three types of metalworking fluids in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer.
Am. J. Ind. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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A systematic, transparent, and data-driven approach was developed to estimate frequency and intensity of exposure to straight, soluble, and synthetic/semi-synthetic metalworking fluids (MWFs) within a case-control study of bladder cancer in New England.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk.
Jonine D Figueroa, Yuanqing Ye, Afshan Siddiq, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson, Victoria K Cortessis, Charles Kooperberg, Olivier Cussenot, Simone Benhamou, Jennifer Prescott, Stefano Porru, Colin P Dinney, Nuria Malats, Dalsu Baris, Mark Purdue, Eric J Jacobs, Demetrius Albanes, Zhaoming Wang, Xiang Deng, Charles C Chung, Wei Tang, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Börje Ljungberg, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Elisabete Weiderpass, Vittorio Krogh, Miren Dorronsoro, Ruth Travis, Anne Tjønneland, Paul Brenan, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elio Riboli, David Conti, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Mariana C Stern, Malcolm C Pike, David Van Den Berg, Jian-Min Yuan, Chancellor Hohensee, Rebecca Rodabough, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Morgan Rouprêt, Eva Compérat, Constance Chen, Immaculata De Vivo, Edward Giovannucci, David J Hunter, Peter Kraft, Sara Lindstrom, Angela Carta, Sofia Pavanello, Cecilia Arici, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Ashish M Kamat, Seth P Lerner, H Barton Grossman, Jie Lin, Jian Gu, Xia Pu, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, William Wheeler, Manolis Kogevinas, Adonina Tardón, Consol Serra, Alfredo Carrato, Reina Garcia-Closas, Josep Lloreta, Molly Schwenn, Margaret R Karagas, Alison Johnson, Alan Schned, Karla R Armenti, G M Hosain, Gerald Andriole, Robert Grubb, Amanda Black, W Ryan Diver, Susan M Gapstur, Stephanie J Weinstein, Jarmo Virtamo, Chris A Haiman, Maria T Landi, Neil Caporaso, Joseph F Fraumeni, Paolo Vineis, Xifeng Wu, Debra T Silverman, Stephen Chanock, Nathaniel Rothman.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2013
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Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10(-5) was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10(-9)) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10(-8)). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10(-7)) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10(-7)); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis.
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Reliability of rapid reporting of cancers in New Hampshire.
J Registry Manag
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2010
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The New Hampshire State Cancer Registry (NHSCR) has a 2-phase reporting system. An abbreviated, "rapid" report of cancer diagnosis or treatment is due to the central registry within 45 days of diagnosis and a more detailed, definitive report is due within 180 days. Rapid reports are used for various research studies, but researchers who contact patients are warned that the rapid reports may contain inaccuracies. This study aimed to assess the reliability of rapid cancer reports.
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Improving the quality of industry and occupation data at a central cancer registry.
Am. J. Ind. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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Central cancer registries are required to collect industry and occupation (I/O) information when available, but the data reported are often incomplete.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.