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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Growth and differentiation factor 3 induces expression of genes related to differentiation in a model of cancer stem cells and protects them from retinoic acid-induced apoptosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Misexpression of growth factors, particularly those related to stem cell-like phenotype, is often observed in several cancer types. It has been found to influence parameters of disease progression like cell proliferation, differentiation, maintenance of undifferentiated phenotype and modulation of the immune system. GDF3 is a TGFB family member associated with pluripotency and differentiation during embryonic development that has been previously reported to be re-expressed in a number of cancer types. However, its role in tumor development and progression has not been clarified yet. In this study we decipher the role of GDF3 in an in vitro model of cancer stem cells, NCCIT cells. By classical approach to study protein function combined with high-throughput technique for transcriptome analysis and differentiation assays we evaluated GDF3 as a potential therapeutic target. We observed that GDF3 robustly induces a panel of genes related to differentiation, including several potent tumor suppressors, without impacting the proliferative capacity. Moreover, we report for the first time the protective effect of GDF3 against retinoic acid-induced apoptosis in cells with stem cell-like properties. Our study implies that blocking of GDF3 combined with retinoic acid-treatment of solid cancers is a compelling direction for further investigations, which can lead to re-design of cancer differentiation therapies.
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Macrophage migration inhibitory factor counterregulates dexamethasone-mediated suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha function and differentially influences human CD4+ T cell proliferation under hypoxia.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2010
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Hypoxia, a feature of inflammation and tumors, is a potent inducer of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). In transformed cells, MIF was shown to modulate and to be modulated via the oxygen-sensitive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids (GCs) were described to regulate MIF action. However, in-depth studies of the interaction between MIF and HIF-1 and GC action in nontransformed primary human CD4(+) T cells under hypoxia are missing. Therefore, we investigated the functional relationship between MIF and HIF and the impact of the GC dexamethasone (DEX) on these key players of inflammation in human CD4(+) T cells. In this article, we show that hypoxia, and specifically HIF-1, is a potent and rapid inducer of MIF expression in primary human CD4(+) T cells, as well as in Jurkat T cells. MIF signaling via CD74, in turn, is essential for hypoxia-mediated HIF-1? expression and HIF-1 target gene induction involving ERK/mammalian target of rapamycin activity complemented by PI3K activation upon mitogen stimulation. Furthermore, MIF signaling enhances T cell proliferation under normoxia but not hypoxia. MIF also counterregulates DEX-mediated suppression of MIF and HIF-1? expression. Based on these data, we suggest that hypoxia significantly affects the expression of HIF-1? in a MIF-dependent manner leading to a positive-feedback loop in primary human CD4(+) T cells, thus influencing the lymphoproliferative response and DEX action via the GC receptor. Therefore, we suggest that HIF and/or MIF could be useful targets to optimize GC therapy when treating inflammation.
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Adaptation of human CD4+ T cells to pathophysiological hypoxia: a transcriptome analysis.
J. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2009
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Inflamed tissues are usually characterized by low oxygen levels. We investigated whether pathophysiological hypoxia (pO(2) < 1%) as found in the rheumatoid synovium modulates the transcriptome of human CD4+ T cells.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.