JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effect of feeding status on mortality response of adult bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) to some insecticide products.
J. Econ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fresh and aged residual deposits of several insecticide products were tested against bed bug adults to determine if a recent bloodmeal affected their mortality response to the residues. The bed bugs with a recent bloodmeal survived significantly longer compared with the unfed ones on their exposure to fresh or aged residual deposits of chlorfenapyr and aged residual deposits of deltamethrin on a wooden substrate. Even though the survival time of fed bed bugs was significantly longer than that of unfed ones on their exposure to fresh residue of deltamethrin and aged residue of desiccant pyrethrin dust, these treatments resulted in similarly high final mortalities regardless of feeding status of the insects. Mortality responses of fed and unfed bed bugs were similar to fresh or aged residual deposits of imidacloprid + cyfluthrin combination and fresh residual deposits of desiccant pyrethrin dust. Topical application assays indicated that a recent bloodmeal significantly increased the bed bug's survival time for chlorfenapyr, but not for deltamethrin. Pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs also showed a similar increase in their survival time for chlorfenapyr after a bloodmeal. The comparison of mortality responses between fed and unfed bed bugs treated with similar amount of chlorfenapyr per fresh body weight indicated that increased body mass was not the primary cause for this bloodmeal-induced tolerance increase for chlorfenapyr. Because the surviving bed bugs can continue ovipositing, the effectiveness of chlorfenapyr residual deposits in bed bug harborages could be significantly affected by the feeding status of the adult bed bug populations.
Related JoVE Video
Pheromone-assisted techniques to improve the efficacy of insecticide sprays against Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
J. Econ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Outdoor residual sprays are among the most common methods for targeting pestiferous ants in urban pest management programs. If impervious surfaces such as concrete are treated with these insecticides, the active ingredients can be washed from the surface by rain or irrigation. As a result, residual sprays with fipronil and pyrethroids are found in urban waterways and aquatic sediments. Given the amount of insecticides applied to urban settings for ant control and their possible impact on urban waterways, the development of alternative strategies is critical to decrease the overall amounts of insecticides applied, while still achieving effective control of target ant species. Herein we report a "pheromone-assisted technique" as an economically viable approach to maximize the efficacy of conventional sprays targeting the Argentine ant. By applying insecticide sprays supplemented with an attractive pheromone compound, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, Argentine ants were diverted from nearby trails and nest entrances and subsequently exposed to insecticide residues. Laboratory experiments with fipronil and bifenthrin sprays indicated that the overall kill of the insecticides on Argentine ant colonies was significantly improved (57-142% increase) by incorporating (Z)-9-hexadecenal in the insecticide sprays. This technique, once it is successfully implemented in practical pest management programs, has the potential of providing maximum control efficacy with reduced amount of insecticides applied in the environment.
Related JoVE Video
The paleoecology, habitats, and stratigraphic range of the enigmatic cretaceous brachiopod peregrinella.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Modern and Cenozoic deep-sea hydrothermal-vent and methane-seep communities are dominated by large tubeworms, bivalves and gastropods. In contrast, many Early Cretaceous seep communities were dominated by the largest Mesozoic rhynchonellid brachiopod, the dimerelloid Peregrinella, the paleoecologic and evolutionary traits of which are still poorly understood. We investigated the nature of Peregrinella based on 11 occurrences world wide and a literature survey. All in situ occurrences of Peregrinella were confirmed as methane-seep deposits, supporting the view that Peregrinella lived exclusively at methane seeps. Strontium isotope stratigraphy indicates that Peregrinella originated in the late Berriasian and disappeared after the early Hauterivian, giving it a geologic range of ca. 9.0 (+1.45/-0.85) million years. This range is similar to that of rhynchonellid brachiopod genera in general, and in this respect Peregrinella differs from seep-inhabiting mollusks, which have, on average, longer geologic ranges than marine mollusks in general. Furthermore, we found that (1) Peregrinella grew to larger sizes at passive continental margins than at active margins; (2) it grew to larger sizes at sites with diffusive seepage than at sites with advective fluid flow; (3) despite its commonly huge numerical abundance, its presence had no discernible impact on the diversity of other taxa at seep sites, including infaunal chemosymbiotic bivalves; and (4) neither its appearance nor its extinction coincides with those of other seep-restricted taxa or with global extinction events during the late Mesozoic. A preference of Peregrinella for diffusive seepage is inferred from the larger average sizes of Peregrinella at sites with more microcrystalline carbonate (micrite) and less seep cements. Because other seep-inhabiting brachiopods occur at sites where such cements are very abundant, we speculate that the various vent- and seep-inhabiting dimerelloid brachiopods since Devonian time may have adapted to these environments in more than one way.
Related JoVE Video
D-methionine pre-loading reduces both noise-induced permanent threshold shift and outer hair cell loss in the chinchilla.
Int J Audiol
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study tested multiple dosing epochs of pre-loaded D-methionine (D-met) for otoprotection from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).
Related JoVE Video
Magnetic Resonance Elastography of the Liver in Patients Status-Post Fontan Procedure: Feasibility and Preliminary Results.
Congenit Heart Dis
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) as a screening tool for elevated liver stiffness in patients status-post Fontan procedure.
Related JoVE Video
Management and long-term consequences of portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation in children.
Liver Transpl.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) occurs in ?12% of pediatric recipients of liver transplantation (LT). Known complications of PVT include portal hypertension, allograft loss, and mortality. The management of PVT is varied. A single-center, case-control study of pediatric LT recipients with portal vein (PV) changes after LT was performed. Cases were categorized as early PVT (if PVT was detected within 30 days of transplantation) or late PVT (if PVT was detected more than 30 days after transplantation or if early PVT persisted beyond 30 days). Two non-PVT control patients were matched on the basis of the recipient weight, transplant indication, and allograft type to each patient with PVT. Thirty-two of the 415 LT recipients (7.7%) received 37 allografts and developed PVT. In comparison with control patients, a higher proportion of patients with PVT had PVT present before LT (13.3% versus 0%, P = 0.01). Patients with early PVT usually returned to the operating room, and 9 of 15 patients (60%) had PV flow restored. Patients with late PVT had lower white blood cell (4.9 [1000/?L] versus 6.8 [1000/?L], P < 0.01) and platelet counts (140 [1000/?L] versus 259 [1000/?L], P < 0.01), an elevated international normalized ratio (1.2 versus 1.0, P < 0.001), and more gastrointestinal bleeding (25% versus 8.3%, P = 0.03) compared to controls. Patients with PVT were also less frequently at the expected grade level (52% versus 88%, P < 0.001). The patient survival rates were 84%, 78%, and 78% and 91%, 84%, and 79% for cases and controls at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The allograft survival rates were 90%, 80%, and 80% for cases and 94%, 89%, and 87% for controls at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In conclusion, patients with early and late PVT had preserved allograft function, and there was no impact on mortality. Patients diagnosed with early PVT often underwent operative interventions with successful restoration of flow. Patients diagnosed with late PVT experienced variceal bleeding, and some required portosystemic shunting procedures. Academic delays were also more common. In late PVT, the clinical presentation dictates care because the optimal management algorithm has not yet been determined. Multi-institutional studies are needed to confirm these findings and improve patient outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
Characteristics of successful recruitment in prospective pediatric pharmacogenetic studies.
Clin Ther
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There is a need to explore feasible means of accruing an appropriate study cohort to help fill the knowledge gap between pharmacogenetic contributions to drug response and clinical application in the pediatric population.
Related JoVE Video
Dose-dependent protection on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity - an electrophysiological study on the effect of three antioxidants in the Sprague-Dawley rat animal model.
Med. Sci. Monit.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Sprague-Dawley rats were used as an acute cisplatin ototoxicity model to compare the chemo-protective efficacy of 2 sulphur-containing antioxidants (D-methionine, N-L-acetylcysteine) and 1 seleno-organic compound (ebselen). Each putative chemo-protective agent was tested at 3 different dosages in order to assess the influence of dose on auditory preservation.
Related JoVE Video
D-methionine (D-met) significantly rescues noise-induced hearing loss: timing studies.
Hear. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We have previously reported rescue from noise-induced auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts with d-methionine (d-met) administration 1 h after noise exposure. The present study investigated further d-met rescue intervals at 3, 5 and 7 h post-noise exposure. Chinchillas laniger were exposed to a 6 h 105 dB sound pressure level (dB SPL) octave band noise (OBN) and then administered d-met i.p. starting 3, 5, or 7 h after noise exposure; controls received saline i.p. immediately after noise exposure. ABR assessments were performed at baseline and on post-exposure days 1 and 21. Outer hair cell (OHC) loss was measured in cochleae obtained at sacrifice 21 days post-exposure. Administration of d-met starting at any of the delay times of 3-7 h post-noise exposure significantly reduced day 21 ABR threshold shift at 2 and 4 kHz and OHC loss at all hair cell regions measured (2, 4, 6 and 8 kHz). ABR threshold shifts in the control group at 6 and 8 kHz were only 8 and 11 dB respectively allowing little opportunity to observe protection at those 2 frequencies.
Related JoVE Video
Renal function in the long term after pediatric liver transplantation: is there a need for protocol kidney biopsies?
Curr Opin Organ Transplant
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
With improving survival rates following solid organ transplantation, assessment of its success has broadened with a focus on long-term outcomes, including nongraft-related medical outcomes and family and patient perceptions of quality of life. Posttransplant renal dysfunction contributes to long-term morbidity and mortality following pediatric liver transplantation. In this review, we provide an overview of our understanding and approach to managing posttransplant renal dysfunction and highlight the existing gaps in knowledge in this area.
Related JoVE Video
Brain growth across the life span in autism: age-specific changes in anatomical pathology.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autism is marked by overgrowth of the brain at the earliest ages but not at older ages when decreases in structural volumes and neuron numbers are observed instead. This has led to the theory of age-specific anatomic abnormalities in autism. Here we report age-related changes in brain size in autistic and typical subjects from 12 months to 50 years of age based on analyses of 586 longitudinal and cross-sectional MRI scans. This dataset is several times larger than the largest autism study to date. Results demonstrate early brain overgrowth during infancy and the toddler years in autistic boys and girls, followed by an accelerated rate of decline in size and perhaps degeneration from adolescence to late middle age in this disorder. We theorize that underlying these age-specific changes in anatomic abnormalities in autism, there may also be age-specific changes in gene expression, molecular, synaptic, cellular, and circuit abnormalities. A peak age for detecting and studying the earliest fundamental biological underpinnings of autism is prenatal life and the first three postnatal years. Studies of the older autistic brain may not address original causes but are essential to discovering how best to help the older aging autistic person. Lastly, the theory of age-specific anatomic abnormalities in autism has broad implications for a wide range of work on the disorder including the design, validation, and interpretation of animal model, lymphocyte gene expression, brain gene expression, and genotype/CNV-anatomic phenotype studies.
Related JoVE Video
Pharmacokinetic analysis and phase 1 study of MRX-1024 in patients treated with radiation therapy with or without cisplatinum for head and neck cancer.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A previous study reported radiation protection from mucosal injury with D-methionine (D-met) in preclinical evaluation; therefore, the pharmacokinetics, safety, and utility of D-met were evaluated clinically.
Related JoVE Video
Nonimmune complications after transplantation.
Pediatr. Clin. North Am.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
As posttransplant longevity has increased, nonimmune complications related to the transplant and posttransplant course have emerged as important factors in defining long-term outcomes. The incidence of, and risk factors for these complications may vary by transplanted organ based on immunosuppressive protocols and preexisting risk factors. This article discusses the relevant nonimmune complications associated with posttransplant care, with a focus on risk factors and management strategies.
Related JoVE Video
Ductal plate malformation-like arrays in early explants after a Kasai procedure are independent of splenic malformation complex (heterotaxy).
Pediatr. Dev. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Biliary atresia has at least 2 proposed forms, the common perinatal and the less common embryonic subtype with earlier onset and/or extrahepatic developmental anomalies. Histologic evidence of ductal plate malformation (DPM)-like change in liver has been proposed both as a marker for the embryonic type and as a predictor of poor outcome after Kasai portoenterostomy. We investigated the prevalence of DPM-like change in liver explants in usual biliary atresia (BA) and in BA with splenic malformation syndrome (BASM). Liver sections from 8 patients with BA and 6 with BASM, all of whom had a Kasai procedure followed by explant before age 2 years, were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, CK7, and AE1/AE3 stains. Each block was scored for inflammation and fibrosis. We estimated the number of portal areas per block and counted the number of definite and possible examples of DPM-like change, defined as a circumferential duct complex arranged around a fibrovascular core. We assessed whether the frequency per portal area was related to low and high scores for either inflammation or fibrosis. Definite and possible examples of DPM-like arrays were present in about 10% of portal areas in both patient groups, but these were unevenly distributed. There was no statistical difference between BA and BASM in terms of the number of examples per portal area. No correlation existed between degree of fibrosis and the intensity of portal inflammation and the number of DPM-like arrays. Ductal plate malformation-like arrays do not distinguish perinatal BA from BA associated with heterotaxy in liver explants after a failed Kasai procedure.
Related JoVE Video
Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift in normal-hearing human subjects.
Ear Hear
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is the availability of an established clinical paradigm with real-world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal-hearing human subjects.
Related JoVE Video
d-Methionine protects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in cortical networks.
Neurotoxicol Teratol
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent widely used for the treatment of various types of cancer. Patients undergoing cisplatin treatment often suffer from a condition known as "chemobrain", ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, nephrotoxicity, seizures, hearing loss and tinnitus. d-Methionine (d-Met), a sulfur-containing nucleophilic antioxidant, has been shown to prevent cisplatin-induced side effects in animals without antitumor interference. In this study, we have used an in vitro model of cortical networks (CNs), enriched in auditory cortex cells; to quantify cisplatin neurotoxicity and the protective effects of d-Met. Dissociated neurons from auditory cortices of mouse embryos were grown on microelectrode arrays with 64 transparent indium-tin oxide electrodes, which enabled continuous optical and electrophysiological monitoring of network neurons. Cisplatin at 0.10-0.25 mM induced up to a 200% increase in spontaneous spiking activity, while concentrations at or above 0.5mM caused irreversible loss of neuronal activity, accompanied by cell death. Pretreatment with d-Met, at a concentration of 1.0mM, prevented the cisplatin-induced excitation at 0.10-0.25 mM, caused sustained excitation without occurrence of cell death at 0.5mM, and delayed cell death at 0.75 mM cisplatin. l-Methionine, the optical isomer, showed lower potency and less efficacy than d-Met, was less protective against 0.1mM cisplatin, and proved ineffective at a concentration of 0.5mM cisplatin. Pre-exposure time of d-Met was associated with the protective effects at 0.1 and 0.5mM cisplatin, with longer pre-exposure times exhibiting better protection. This study quantifies as a function of concentration and time that d-Met protects central nervous system tissue from acute cisplatin toxicity.
Related JoVE Video
Platinum-induced ototoxicity in children: a consensus review on mechanisms, predisposition, and protection, including a new International Society of Pediatric Oncology Boston ototoxicity scale.
J. Clin. Oncol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The platinum chemotherapy agents cisplatin and carboplatin are widely used in the treatment of adult and pediatric cancers. Cisplatin causes hearing loss in at least 60% of pediatric patients. Reducing cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin ototoxicity without reducing efficacy is important.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.