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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle speed in RBL-2H3 cells.
PeerJ
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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For the first time we show the effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle transport in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. RBL-2H3 cells cultured with 15 moles/L deuterium showed decreased cell growth which was attributed to cells not doubling their DNA content. Experimental observations also showed an increase in vesicle speed for cells cultured in deuterium oxide. This increase in vesicle speed was not observed in deuterium oxide cultures treated with a microtubule-destabilizing drug, suggesting that deuterium oxide affects microtubule-dependent vesicle transport.
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Analytic solutions for some reaction-diffusion scenarios.
J Phys Chem B
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2013
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Motivated currently by the problem of coalescence of receptor clusters in mast cells in the general subject of immune reactions, and formerly by the investigation of exciton trapping and sensitized luminescence in molecular systems and aggregates, we present analytic expressions for survival probabilities of moving entities undergoing diffusion and reaction on encounter. Results we provide cover several novel situations in simple 1-d systems as well as higher-dimensional counterparts along with a useful compendium of such expressions in chemical physics and allied fields. We also emphasize the importance of the relationship of discrete sink term analysis to continuum boundary condition studies.
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Image correlation spectroscopy of randomly distributed disks.
J Biol Phys
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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Image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) has been widely used to quantify spatiotemporal distributions of fluorescently labelled cell membrane proteins and receptors. When the membrane proteins are randomly distributed, ICS may be used to estimate protein densities, provided the proteins behave as point-like objects. At high protein area fraction, however, even randomly placed proteins cannot obey Poisson statistics, because of excluded area. The difficulty can arise if the protein effective area is quite large, or if proteins form large complexes or aggregate into clusters. In these cases, there is a need to determine the correct form of the intensity correlation function for hard disks in two dimensions, including the excluded area effects. We present an approximate but highly accurate algorithm for the computation of this correlation function. The correlation function was verified using test images of randomly distributed hard disks of uniform intensity convolved with the microscope point spread function. This algorithm can be readily modified to compute exact intensity correlation functions for any probe geometry, interaction potential, and fluorophore distribution; we show how to apply it to describe a random distribution of large proteins labeled with a single fluorophore.
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Distribution and dynamics of rat basophilic leukemia immunoglobulin E receptors (FcepsilonRI) on planar ligand-presenting surfaces.
Biophys. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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There is considerable interest in the signaling mechanisms of immunoreceptors, especially when triggered with membrane-bound ligands. We have quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics of the redistribution of immunoglobulin E-loaded receptors (IgE-FcepsilonRI) on rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells in contact with fluid and gel-phase membranes displaying ligands for immunoglobulin E, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. To clearly separate the kinetics of receptor redistribution from cell spreading, and to precisely define the initial contact time (+/-50 ms), micropipette cell manipulation was used to bring individual cells into contact with surfaces. On ligand-free surfaces, there are micron-scale heterogeneities in fluorescence that likely reflect regions of the cell that are more closely apposed to the substrate. When ligands are present, receptor clusters form with this same size scale. The initial rate of accumulation of receptors into the clusters is consistent with diffusion-limited trapping with D approximately 10(-1) microm2/s. These results support the hypothesis that clusters form by diffusion to cell-surface contact regions. Over longer timescales (>10 s), individual clusters moved with both diffusive and directed motion components. The dynamics of the cluster motion is similar to the dynamics of membrane fluctuations of cells on ligand-free fluid membranes. Thus, the same cellular machinery may be responsible for both processes.
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Formation of a mast cell synapse: Fc epsilon RI membrane dynamics upon binding mobile or immobilized ligands on surfaces.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2009
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Fc epsilonRI on mast cells form a synapse when presented with mobile, bilayer-incorporated Ag. In this study, we show that receptor reorganization within the contacting mast cell membrane is markedly different upon binding of mobile and immobilized ligands. Rat basophilic leukemia mast cells primed with fluorescent anti-DNP IgE were engaged by surfaces presenting either bilayer-incorporated, monovalent DNP-lipid (mobile ligand), or chemically cross-linked, multivalent DNP (immobilized ligand). Total internal reflection fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy methods were used to visualize receptor reorganization at the contact site. The spatial relationships of Fc epsilonRI to other cellular components at the synapse, such as actin, cholesterol, and linker for activation of T cells, were also analyzed. Stimulation of mast cells with immobilized polyvalent ligand resulted in typical levels of degranulation. Remarkably, degranulation also followed interaction of mast cells, with bilayers presenting mobile, monovalent ligand. Receptors engaged with mobile ligand coalesce into large, cholesterol-rich clusters that occupy the central portion of the contacting membrane. These data indicate that Fc epsilonRI cross-linking is not an obligatory step in triggering mast cell signaling and suggest that dense populations of mobile receptors are capable of initiating low-level degranulation upon ligand recognition.
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Single-particle tracking of immunoglobulin E receptors (Fc?RI) in micron-sized clusters and receptor patches.
FEBS Lett.
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When mast cells contact a monovalent antigen-bearing fluid lipid bilayer, IgE-loaded Fc?RI receptors aggregate at contact points and trigger degranulation and the release of immune activators. We used two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking to show that most fluorescently labeled receptor complexes diffuse freely within these micron-size clusters, with a diffusion coefficient comparable to free receptors in resting cells. At later times, when the small clusters coalesce to form larger patches, receptors diffuse even more rapidly. In all cases, Monte Carlo diffusion simulations ensured that the tracking results were free of bias, and distinguished biological from statistical variation. These results show the diversity in receptor mobility in mast cells, demonstrating at least three distinct states of receptor diffusivity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.