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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The Importance of Controlling PaCO2 Throughout Long-Term Noninvasive Ventilation.
Respir Care
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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The significance of changes in PaCO2 during long-term noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on prognosis remains unclear. We aimed to clarify whether stabilizing PaCO2 during NIV had a favorable prognostic effect.
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[Evaluation of tuberculosis treatment including levofloxacin (LVFX) in cases who could not continue standard regimen].
Kekkaku
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2011
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate tuberculosis treatment including levofloxacin (LVFX) and to investigate the effectiveness of changing drug regimens at our hospital.
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PaCO2 six months after the initiation of long-term noninvasive ventilation in patients with COPD.
Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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The appropriate target level for PaCO(2) after the introduction of long-term noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with COPD remains uncertain, and therefore must be tested.
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Importance of the PaCO(2) from 3 to 6 months after initiation of long-term non-invasive ventilation.
Respir Med
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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The level at which arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)) a few months after introduction of long-term non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is associated with a favorable prognosis remains uncertain.
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Importance of ventilator mode in long-term noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.
Respir Med
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2009
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Long-term noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is associated with an excellent survival rate, especially in post-tuberculosis patients. Nothing is currently known on which method of ventilatory support is associated with a better continuation of long-term NPPV, which itself might lead to longer survival.
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Postmortem findings in a patient with cerebral amyloid angiopathy actively treated with corticosteroid.
Amyloid
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We examined histopathological changes in cerebrovascular amyloid deposition in a patient with cerebral amyloid angiopathy receiving corticosteroid therapy. A 69-year-old female developed subacute onset cognitive decline, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed subarachnoid hemorrhage with leptomeningeal enhancement. She entered in an apathetic state due to communicating hydrocephalus and a ventricle-peritoneal (V-P) shunt operation was performed. Brain biopsy disclosed multiple cortical microhemorrhages and severe Congophilic angiopathy with positive A?-immunoreactivity in most vessels. Inflammatory mononuclear cells surrounded a few severe amyloid-laden leptomeningeal vessels. She received high-dose corticosteroid, which was slowly tapered. She gradually recovered but finally died 1.5 years later with no recurrence of CAA-related hemorrhages. Postmortem examination of the brain showed multiple old microhemorrhages in the cortex and extensive degeneration of cerebral white matter. The cortical and leptomeningeal vascular walls showed a few Congophilic amyloid deposits, but small deposits with A?-immunoreactivity were frequently seen. There was no infiltration of inflammatory cells in either leptomeninges or vascular walls. Electron microscopy revealed sparse aggregation of amyloid fibrils in significant numbers of vascular walls. Biochemical analysis disclosed that A?1-40-immunoreactive amyloid protein fractions obtained from the patients leptomeninges were very small in amount. Comparing the previous biopsy findings with those at autopsy, the total disappearance of the inflammatory cell infiltration and diminishing of the cerebrovascular amyloid deposits were noted.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.