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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Associations between Positive Parenting Practices and Child Externalizing Behavior in Underserved Latino Immigrant Families.
Fam Process
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2014
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This study examined whether five specific parenting practices (i.e., monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, problem solving, and positive involvement) were associated with reduced child externalizing behaviors among a sample of Latino immigrant families. It utilized baseline data from 83 Latino couples with children participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of a culturally adapted parenting intervention. Results reveal that monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, and problem solving each made independent contributions to the prediction of child externalizing behavior, although not all in the expected direction. Further analyses examining mothers and fathers separately suggest that mother-reported monitoring and father-reported discipline practices uniquely contributed to these findings. These results may have important implications for prevention and clinical intervention efforts with Latino immigrant families, including the cultural adaptation and implementation of parenting interventions with this underserved population.
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The Role of Intrapersonal and Ecodevelopmental Factors in the Lives of Latino Alternative High School Youth.
J Ethn Cult Divers Soc Work
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2014
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Despite efforts aimed at achieving health equity, Latino youth continue to experience significant health and mental health disparities. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the role of intrapersonal and ecodevelopmental factors, including family, peer, school, and community, in the lives of Latino alternative high school youth residing in the Southwest, United States. Five focus groups were implemented with a total of 19 participants. Study findings are indicative of an ecology characterized by multiple challenges that have a significant impact on the lives of Latino alternative high school youth. Findings from this study reinforce that there remains a great need to fully understand the scope and influence of intrapersonal and ecodevelopmental factors among Latino alternative high school youth to inform the development of culturally-responsive social work preventive intervention programs.
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Diversity, social justice, and intersectionality trends in C/MFT: a content analysis of three family therapy journals, 2004-2011.
J Marital Fam Ther
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2014
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In this study, we analyzed the amount of attention given to diversity, social justice, and an intersectional approach to social inequalities over an 8-year period (769 articles) in three family therapy journals. Overall, 28.1% of articles addressed at least one diversity issue, and a social justice framework was utilized in 48.1% of diversity articles. A systemic, intersectional approach to conceptualizing and analyzing multiple social inequalities was utilized in 17.6% of diversity articles. The most common goals addressed in diversity articles, articles using a social justice framework, and articles using an intersectional approach are also identified. Findings indicate that, despite important work being carried out, more work remains to further identify how addressing diversity issues can improve client outcomes.
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"Its a Struggle but I Can Do It. Im Doing It for Me and My Kids": The Psychosocial Characteristics and Life Experiences of At-Risk Homeless Parents in Transitional Housing.
J Marital Fam Ther
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2013
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Families experiencing homelessness face a number of risks to their psychosocial health and well-being, yet few studies have examined the topic of parenting among homeless families. The purpose of this multimethod, descriptive study was to acquire a better understanding of the psychosocial status and life experiences of homeless parents residing in transitional housing. Quantitative data were collected from 69 parents and primary caregivers living in a transitional housing community, with a cohort of 24 participants also contributing qualitative data. The quantitative results suggest risk associated with depression, parenting stress, and negative parenting practices. The qualitative findings highlight five themes that convey both the challenges faced by homeless parents as well as the resilience they display in spite of such adversity. These results extend current scholarship on homeless families with children and can better inform how couple and family therapists work with this at-risk population.
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"En el grupo tomas conciencia (in group you become aware)": Latino immigrants satisfaction with a culturally informed intervention for men who batter.
Violence Against Women
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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Qualitative interviews were conducted with 21 Latino immigrant men who participated in a culturally informed batterer intervention. The objectives of this investigation were twofold. First, to identify the treatment components that facilitated the participants willingness to engage in a process of change aimed at terminating their abusive behaviors. Second, to describe the treatment components that led to their satisfaction with the intervention. Research findings confirm that the Spanish version of the Duluth curriculum can be beneficial for Latino immigrant batterers. Results also demonstrate the critical role of culture as it refers to content of the intervention and method of delivery.
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"Queremos aprender": Latino immigrants call to integrate cultural adaptation with best practice knowledge in a parenting intervention.
Fam Process
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
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Despite the unique and challenging circumstances confronting Latino immigrant families, debate still exists as to the need to culturally adapt evidence-based interventions for dissemination with this population. Following the grounded theory approach, the current qualitative investigation utilized focus group interviews with 83 Latino immigrant parents to explore the relevance of culturally adapting an evidence-based parenting intervention to be disseminated within this population. Findings from this study indicate that Latino immigrant parents want to participate in a culturally adapted parenting intervention as long as it is culturally relevant, respectful, and responsive to their life experiences. Research results also suggest that the parenting skills participants seek to enhance are among those commonly targeted by evidence-based parenting interventions. This study contributes to the cultural adaptation/fidelity balance debate by highlighting the necessity of exploring ways to develop culturally adapted interventions characterized by high cultural relevance, as well as high fidelity to the core components that have established efficacy for evidence-based parenting interventions.
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Culturally adapting an evidence-based parenting intervention for Latino immigrants: the need to integrate fidelity and cultural relevance.
Fam Process
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Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. However, the cultural adaptation and dissemination of evidence-based parenting interventions among Latino populations continues to be scarce despite extensive research that demonstrates the long-term positive effects of these interventions. The purpose of this article is threefold: (1) justify the importance of cultural adaptation research as a key strategy to disseminate efficacious interventions among Latinos, (2) describe the initial steps of a program of prevention research with Latino immigrants aimed at culturally adapting an evidence-based intervention informed by parent management training principles, and (3) discuss implications for advancing cultural adaptation prevention practice and research, based on the initial feasibility and cultural acceptability findings of the current investigation.
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Examining the Process of Change in an Evidence-Based Parent Training Intervention: A Qualitative Study Grounded in the Experiences of Participants.
Prev Sci
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While strong research evidence demonstrates that parent training interventions are capable of preventing child behavioral problems, much less is known about how the participants in these programs experience the change process. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of how parents experiences in an evidence-based parent training intervention led to change in their parenting practices, based on the first-person accounts of program participants. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth, individual interviews with parents who had completed the intervention known as Parent Management Training-the Oregon Model (PMTO™). Data were analyzed according to principles of the grounded theory approach, using the constant comparative method and a sequential process of open, axial, and selective coding. Study findings suggest that parents make active and intentional efforts to attempt, appraise, and apply the intervention material within their various life contexts, contributing to change in their parenting practices. Aspects of intervention content, method of delivery, and the role of the interventionist were also found to be important. This study can guide further prevention research into the mechanisms of change operating in parent training interventions and has the potential to inform continued efforts to adapt and implement evidence-based parent training interventions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.