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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Virologic and immunologic evidence of multifocal genital herpes simplex virus 2 infection.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation is thought to be anatomically and temporally localized, coincident with limited ganglionic infection. Short, subclinical shedding episodes are the most common form of HSV-2 reactivation, with host clearance mechanisms leading to rapid containment. The anatomic distribution of shedding episodes has not been characterized. To precisely define patterns of anatomic reactivation, we divided the genital tract into a 22-region grid and obtained daily swabs for 20 days from each region in 28 immunocompetent, HSV-2-seropositive persons. HSV was detected via PCR, and sites of asymptomatic HSV shedding were subjected to a biopsy procedure within 24 h. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were quantified by immunofluorescence, and HSV-specific CD4(+) T cells were identified by intracellular cytokine cytometry. HSV was detected in 868 (7%) of 11,603 genital swabs at a median of 12 sites per person (range, 0 to 22). Bilateral HSV detection occurred on 83 (67%) days with shedding, and the median quantity of virus detected/day was associated with the number of sites positive (P < 0.001). In biopsy specimens of asymptomatic shedding sites, we found increased numbers of CD8(+) T cells compared to control tissue (27 versus 13 cells/mm(2), P = 0.03) and identified HSV-specific CD4(+) T cells. HSV reactivations emanate from widely separated anatomic regions of the genital tract and are associated with a localized cellular infiltrate that was demonstrated to be HSV specific in 3 cases. These data provide evidence that asymptomatic HSV-2 shedding contributes to chronic inflammation throughout the genital tract.
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Maternal naming of object wholes versus parts to preverbal infants: a fine-grained analysis of scaffolding at 6-8 months.
Infant Behav Dev
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Maternal naming of object wholes versus parts was examined during interactive free-play. Forty-two Caucasian- and Hispanic-American mothers and their preverbal infants of 6-8 months were video-taped interacting naturally during toy play. For the purpose of fine-grained analyses, maternal naming of object wholes versus parts were coded for bimodal naming (e.g., temporal synchrony) and object motion (e.g., shaking) to examine any differences in these measures across the two word types. The results revealed that during naming, mothers simultaneously moved object wholes more often than they did object parts to highlight the object wholes in their infants visual field. To further highlight object wholes during naming, mothers predominantly shook or loomed object wholes in synchrony with their naming more often than object parts. These empirical findings suggest that very early during infants word-mapping development, maternal scaffolding is manifold and assists in infants disambiguation of names for object wholes versus parts.
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T-cell immunity to human alphaherpesviruses.
Curr Opin Virol
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Human alphaherpesviruses (?HHV) - herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) - infect mucosal epithelial cells, establish a lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons, and reactivate intermittingly to cause recrudescent disease. Although chronic ?HHV infections co-exist with brisk T-cell responses, T-cell immune suppression is associated with worsened recurrent infection. Induction of ?HHV-specific T-cell immunity is complex and results in poly-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in peripheral blood. Specific T-cells are localized to ganglia during the chronic phase of HSV infection and to several infected areas during recurrences, and persist long after viral clearance. These recent advances hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates.
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Protective HIV-specific CD8+ T cells evade Treg cell suppression.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Specific human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), notably HLA-B*27 and HLA-B*57 allele groups, have long been associated with control of HIV-1. Although the majority of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells lose proliferative capacity during chronic infection, T cells restricted by HLA-B*27 or HLA-B*57 allele groups do not. Here we show that CD8(+) T cells restricted by protective HLA allele groups are not suppressed by T(reg) cells, whereas, within the same individual, T cells restricted by nonprotective alleles are highly suppressed ex vivo. This differential sensitivity of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells to T(reg) cell-mediated suppression correlates with their expression of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) after stimulation with their cognate epitopes. Furthermore, we show that HLA-B*27- and HLA-B*57-restricted effectors also evade T(reg) cell-mediated suppression by directly killing T(reg) cells they encounter in a granzyme B (GzmB)-dependent manner. This study uncovers a previously unknown explanation for why HLA-B*27 and HLA-B*57 allele groups are associated with delayed HIV-1 disease progression.
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Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics.
Dev. Comp. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.
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Sensing disease and danger: a survey of vertebrate PRRs and their origins.
Dev. Comp. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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A key facet of the innate immune response lays in its ability to recognize and respond to invading microorganisms and cellular disturbances. Through the use of germ-line encoded PRRs, the innate immune system is capable of detecting invariant pathogen motifs termed pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) that are distinct from host encoded proteins or products released from dying cells, which are known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). PAMPs and DAMPs include both protein and nucleic acids for the detection and response to pathogens and metabolic "danger" signals. This is by far one of the most active areas of research as recent studies have shown retinoic acid inducible gene 1 (RIG1)-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLRs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the recently described AIM-like receptors (ALRs) are responsible for initiating interferon production or the assembly and activation of the inflammasome, ultimately resulting in the release of bioactive IL-1 family members. Overall, the vertebrate PRR recognition machinery consists of seven domains (e.g., Death, NACHT, CARD, TIR, LRR, PYD, helicase), most of which can be traced to the very origins of the deuterostomes. This review is intended to provide an overview of the basic components that are used by vertebrates to detect and respond to pathogens, with an emphasis on these receptors in fish as well as a brief note on their likely origins.
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Description of an elasmobranch TCR coreceptor: CD8? from Rhinobatos productus.
Dev. Comp. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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Cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role for the control and eradication of intracellular pathogens. To learn more about the evolutionary origins of the first signal (Signal 1) for T-cell activation, we cloned CD8? from an elasmobranch, Rhinobatos productus. Similar to full-length CD8? cDNAs from other vertebrates, Rhpr-CD8? (1800bp) encodes a 219 amino acid open reading frame composed of a signal peptide, an extracellular IgSF V domain and a stalk/hinge region followed by a well-conserved transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail. Overall, the mature Rhpr-CD8? protein (201 aa) displays ? 30% amino acid identity with mammalian CD8? including absolute conservation of cysteine residues involved in the IgSf V domain fold and dimerization of CD8?? and CD8??. One prominent feature is the absence of the LCK association motif (CXC) that is needed for achieving signal 1 in tetrapods. Both elasmobranch and teleost CD8? protein sequences possess a similar but distinctly different motif (CXH) in the cytoplasmic tail. The overall genomic structure of CD8? has been conserved during the course of vertebrate evolution both for the number of exons and phase of splicing. Finally, quantitative RTPCR demonstrated that elasmobranch CD8? is expressed in lymphoid-rich tissues similar to CD8 in other vertebrates. The results from this study indicate the existence of CD8 prior to the emergence of the gnathostomes (>450 MYA) while providing evidence that the canonical LCK association motif in mammals is likely a derived characteristic of tetrapod CD8?, suggesting potential differences for T-cell education and activation in the various gnathostomes.
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Diversity in CD8(+) T cell function and epitope breadth among persons with genital herpes.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2010
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CD8(+) T cells are known to be important in clearing herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections. However, investigating the specific antiviral mechanisms employed by HSV-2-specific T cell populations is limited by a lack of reagents such as CD8(+) T cell epitopes and specific tetramers. Using a combination of intracellular cytokine staining flow cytometry and ELISpot methods, we functionally characterized peripheral HSV-2-specific CD8(+) T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) that recognize 14 selected HSV-2 open-reading frames (ORFs) from 55 HSV-2 seropositive persons; within these ORFs, we subsequently identified more than 20 unique CD8(+) T cell epitopes. CD8(+) T cells to HSV-2 exhibited significant heterogeneity in their functional characteristics, proliferation, production of inflammatory cytokines, and potential to degranulate ex vivo. The diversity in T cell response in these ex vivo assessments offers the potential of defining immune correlates of HSV-2 reactivation in humans.
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In situ detection of Gag-specific CD8+ cells in the GI tract of SIV infected Rhesus macaques.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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SIV and HIV predominantly replicate in lymphoid tissue, but the study of virus specific CD8+ T cells in intact lymphoid tissue is difficult, as traditional in situ tetramer staining requires fresh tissue.
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Characterization of the interferon genes in homozygous rainbow trout reveals two novel genes, alternate splicing and differential regulation of duplicated genes.
Fish Shellfish Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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The genes encoding the type I and type II interferons (IFNs) have previously been identified in rainbow trout and their proteins partially characterized. These previous studies reported a single type II IFN (rtIFN-gamma) and three rainbow trout type I IFN genes that are classified into either group I (rtIFN1, rtIFN2) or group II (rtIFN3). In this present study, we report the identification of a novel IFN-gamma gene (rtIFN-gamma2) and a novel type I group II IFN (rtIFN4) in homozygous rainbow trout and predict that additional IFN genes or pseudogenes exist in the rainbow trout genome. Additionally, we provide evidence that short and long forms of rtIFN1 are actively and differentially transcribed in homozygous trout, and likely arose due to alternate splicing of the first exon. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to systematically profile all of the rainbow trout IFN transcripts, with high specificity at an individual gene level, in naïve fish and after stimulation with virus or viral-related molecules. Cloned PCR products were used to ensure the specificity of the qRT-PCR assays and as absolute standards to assess transcript abundance of each gene. All IFN genes were modulated in response to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a DNA vaccine based on the IHNV glycoprotein, and poly I:C. The most inducible of the type I IFN genes, by all stimuli tested, were rtIFN3 and the short transcript form of rtIFN1. Gene expression of rtIFN-gamma1 and rtIFN-gamma2 was highly up-regulated by IHNV infection and DNA vaccination but rtIFN-gamma2 was induced to a greater magnitude. The specificity of the qRT-PCR assays reported here will be useful for future studies aimed at identifying which cells produce IFNs at early time points after infection.
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Peripheral blood CD4 T-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) reactivity to herpes simplex virus 2 and pDC number do not correlate with the clinical or virologic severity of recurrent genital herpes.
J. Virol.
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Leukocytes participate in the immune control of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Data from HIV coinfections, germ line mutations, and case reports suggest involvement of CD4 T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). We investigated the relationships between these cells and recurrent genital herpes disease severity in the general population. Circulating CD4 T-cell responses to HSV-2 were measured in specimens from 67 immunocompetent individuals with measured genital lesion and HSV shedding rates. Similarly, pDC number and functional responses to HSV-2 were analyzed in 40 persons. CD4 responses and pDC concentrations and responses ranged as much as 100-fold between persons while displaying moderate within-person consistency over time. No correlations were observed between these immune response parameters and genital HSV-2 severity. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) coinfection was not correlated with differences in HSV-2-specific CD4 T-cell responses. The CD4 T-cell response to HSV-2 was much more polyfunctional than was the response to CMV. These data suggest that other immune cell subsets with alternate phenotypes or anatomical locations may be responsible for genital herpes control in chronically infected individuals.
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Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.
Viruses
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Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non?virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.