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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Rice fertilization-Independent Endosperm1 regulates seed size under heat stress by controlling early endosperm development.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2014
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Although heat stress reduces seed size in rice (Oryza sativa), little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed reduction in seed size and yield. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of heat sensitivity and reduced seed size, we imposed a moderate (34°C) and a high (42°C) heat stress treatment on developing rice seeds during the postfertilization stage. Both stress treatments reduced the final seed size. At a cellular level, the moderate heat stress resulted in precocious endosperm cellularization, whereas severe heat-stressed seeds failed to cellularize. Initiation of endosperm cellularization is a critical developmental transition required for normal seed development, and it is controlled by Polycomb Repressive Complex2 (PRC2) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We observed that a member of PRC2 called Fertilization-Independent Endosperm1 (OsFIE1) was sensitive to temperature changes, and its expression was negatively correlated with the duration of the syncytial stage during heat stress. Seeds from plants overexpressing OsFIE1 had reduced seed size and exhibited precocious cellularization. The DNA methylation status and a repressive histone modification of OsFIE1 were observed to be temperature sensitive. Our data suggested that the thermal sensitivity of seed enlargement could partly be caused by altered epigenetic regulation of endosperm development during the transition from the syncytial to the cellularized state.
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Transcriptome analysis highlights changes in the leaves of maize plants cultivated in acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al(3+)
Mol. Biol. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2014
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Soil acidity limits crop yields worldwide and is a common result of aluminum (Al) phytotoxicity, which is known to inhibit root growth. Here, we compared the transcriptome of leaves from maize seedlings grown under control conditions (soil without free Al) and under acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al. This study reports, for the first time, the complex transcriptional changes that occur in the leaves of maize plants grown in acidic soil with phytotoxic levels of Al. Our data indicate that 668 genes were differentially expressed in the leaves of plants grown in acidic soil, which is significantly greater than that observed in our previous work with roots. Genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes were upregulated, although no specific transporter of organic acids was differentially expressed in leaves. We also provide evidence for positive roles for auxin and brassinosteroids in Al tolerance, whereas gibberellin and jasmonate may have negative roles. Our data indicate that plant responses to acidic soil with high Al content are not restricted to the root; tolerance mechanisms are also displayed in the aerial parts of the plant, thus indicating that the entire plant responds to stress.
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An Arabidopsis mitochondrial uncoupling protein confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2011
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Plants are challenged by a large number of environmental stresses that reduce productivity and even cause death. Both chloroplasts and mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species under normal conditions; however, stress causes an imbalance in these species that leads to deviations from normal cellular conditions and a variety of toxic effects. Mitochondria have uncoupling proteins (UCPs) that uncouple electron transport from ATP synthesis. There is evidence that UCPs play a role in alleviating stress caused by reactive oxygen species overproduction. However, direct evidence that UCPs protect plants from abiotic stress is lacking.
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A novel stress-induced sugarcane gene confers tolerance to drought, salt and oxidative stress in transgenic tobacco plants.
PLoS ONE
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Drought is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity worldwide. Sugarcane can withstand periods of water scarcity during the final stage of culm maturation, during which sucrose accumulation occurs. Meanwhile, prolonged periods of drought can cause severe plant losses.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.