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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reducing endoglin activity limits calcineurin and TRPC-6 expression and improves survival in a mouse model of right ventricular pressure overload.
J Am Heart Assoc
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2014
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Right ventricular (RV) failure is a major cause of mortality worldwide and is often a consequence of RV pressure overload (RVPO). Endoglin is a coreceptor for the profibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1). TGF-?1 signaling by the canonical transient receptor protein channel 6 (TRPC-6) was recently reported to stimulate calcineurin-mediated myofibroblast transformation, a critical component of cardiac fibrosis. We hypothesized that reduced activity of the TGF-?1 coreceptor, endoglin, limits RV calcineurin expression and improves survival in RVPO.
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Endoglin: a critical mediator of cardiovascular health.
Vasc Health Risk Manag
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Endoglin (CD105) is a type III auxiliary receptor for the transforming growth factor beta (TGF?) superfamily. Several lines of evidence suggest that endoglin plays a critical role in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis. Seemingly disparate disease conditions, including hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, pre-eclampsia, and cardiac fibrosis, have now been associated with endoglin. Given the central role of the TGF? superfamily in multiple disease conditions, this review provides a detailed update on endoglin as an evolving therapeutic target in the management of cardiovascular disease.
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Long-term restoration of cardiac dystrophin expression in golden retriever muscular dystrophy following rAAV6-mediated exon skipping.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2011
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Although restoration of dystrophin expression via exon skipping in both cardiac and skeletal muscle has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse, restoration of cardiac dystrophin expression in large animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has proven to be a challenge. In large animals, investigators have focused on using intravenous injection of antisense oligonucleotides (AO) to mediate exon skipping. In this study, we sought to optimize restoration of cardiac dystrophin expression in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) model using percutaneous transendocardial delivery of recombinant AAV6 (rAAV6) to deliver a modified U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) carrying antisense sequence to target the exon splicing enhancers of exons 6 and 8 and correct the disrupted reading frame. We demonstrate restoration of cardiac dystrophin expression at 13 months confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblot as well as membrane localization by immunohistochemistry. This was accompanied by improved cardiac function as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Percutaneous transendocardial delivery of rAAV6 expressing a modified U7 exon skipping construct is a safe, effective method for restoration of dystrophin expression and improvement of cardiac function in the GRMD canine and may be easily translatable to human DMD patients.
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Is functional hypertrophy and specific force coupled with the addition of myonuclei at the single muscle fiber level?
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2011
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Muscle force is typically proportional to muscle size, resulting in constant force normalized to muscle fiber cross-sectional area (specific force). Mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exhibit a proportional gain in muscle force and size, but not the myostatin-deficient mice. In an attempt to explore the role of the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei [myonuclear domain (MND) size] on functional capacity of skeletal muscle, we have investigated specific force in relation to MND and the content of the molecular motor protein, myosin, at the single muscle fiber level from myostatin-knockout (Mstn(-/-)) and IGF-1-overexpressing (mIgf1(+/+)) mice. We hypothesize that the addition of extra myonuclei is a prerequisite for maintenance of specific force during muscle hypertrophy. A novel algorithm was used to measure individual MNDs in 3 dimensions along the length of single muscle fibers from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and the slow-twitch soleus muscle. A significant effect of the size of individual MNDs in hypertrophic muscle fibers on both specific force and myosin content was observed. This effect was muscle cell type specific and suggested there is a critical volume individual myonuclei can support efficiently. The large MNDs found in fast muscles of Mstn(-/-) mice were correlated with the decrement in specific force and myosin content in Mstn(-/-) muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition may not be able to maintain the appropriate MND for optimal function.
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Long-term systemic myostatin inhibition via liver-targeted gene transfer in golden retriever muscular dystrophy.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2011
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Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked recessive disease affecting 1 in 3,500 newborn boys for which there is no effective treatment or cure. One novel strategy that has therapeutic potential for DMD is inhibition of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass that may also promote fibrosis. Therefore, our goal in this study was to evaluate systemic myostatin inhibition in the golden retriever model of DMD (GRMD). GRMD canines underwent liver-directed gene transfer of a self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 8 vector designed to express a secreted dominant-negative myostatin peptide (n = 4) and were compared with age-matched, untreated GRMD controls (n = 3). Dogs were followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 13 months to assess cross-sectional area and volume of skeletal muscle, then euthanized so that tissue could be harvested for morphological and histological analysis. We found that systemic myostatin inhibition resulted in increased muscle mass in GRMD dogs as assessed by MRI and confirmed at tissue harvest. We also found that hypertrophy of type IIA fibers was largely responsible for the increased muscle mass and that reductions in serum creatine kinase and muscle fibrosis were associated with long-term myostatin inhibition in GRMD. This is the first report describing the effects of long-term, systemic myostatin inhibition in a large-animal model of DMD, and we believe that the simple and effective nature of our liver-directed gene-transfer strategy makes it an ideal candidate for evaluation as a novel therapeutic approach for DMD patients.
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Chronic losartan administration reduces mortality and preserves cardiac but not skeletal muscle function in dystrophic mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2011
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Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disorder affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle for which there is no effective therapy. Angiotension receptor blockade (ARB) has excellent therapeutic potential in DMD based on recent data demonstrating attenuation of skeletal muscle disease progression during 6-9 months of therapy in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Since cardiac-related death is major cause of mortality in DMD, it is important to evaluate the effect of any novel treatment on the heart. Therefore, we evaluated the long-term impact of ARB on both the skeletal muscle and cardiac phenotype of the mdx mouse. Mdx mice received either losartan (0.6 g/L) (n?=?8) or standard drinking water (n?=?9) for two years, after which echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Skeletal muscle weight, morphology, and function were assessed. Fibrosis was evaluated in the diaphragm and heart by Trichrome stain and by determination of tissue hydroxyproline content. By the study endpoint, 88% of treated mice were alive compared to only 44% of untreated (p?=?0.05). No difference in skeletal muscle morphology, function, or fibrosis was noted in losartan-treated animals. Cardiac function was significantly preserved with losartan treatment, with a trend towards reduction in cardiac fibrosis. We saw no impact on the skeletal muscle disease progression, suggesting that other pathways that trigger fibrosis dominate over angiotensin II in skeletal muscle long term, unlike the situation in the heart. Our study suggests that ARB may be an important prophylactic treatment for DMD-associated cardiomyopathy, but will not impact skeletal muscle disease.
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Activin IIB receptor blockade attenuates dystrophic pathology in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Muscle Nerve
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2010
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Modulation of transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) signaling to promote muscle growth holds tremendous promise for the muscular dystrophies and other disorders involving the loss of functional muscle mass. Previous studies have focused on the TGF-? family member myostatin and demonstrated that inhibition of myostatin leads to muscle growth in normal and dystrophic mice. We describe a unique method of systemic inhibition of activin IIB receptor signaling via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of a soluble form of the extracellular domain of the activin IIB receptor to the liver. Treatment of mdx mice with activin IIB receptor blockade led to increased skeletal muscle mass, increased force production in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and reduced serum creatine kinase. No effect on heart mass or function was observed. Our results indicate that activin IIB receptor blockade represents a novel and effective therapeutic strategy for the muscular dystrophies.
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Overexpression of SERCA1a in the mdx diaphragm reduces susceptibility to contraction-induced damage.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism of muscle damage in dystrophin-deficient muscle remains disputed, calcium appears to be a critical mediator of the dystrophic process. Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models of dystrophin deficiency exhibit extensive abnormalities of calcium homeostasis, which we hypothesized would be mitigated by increased expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump. Neonatal adeno-associated virus gene transfer of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase 1a to the mdx diaphragm decreased centrally located nuclei and resulted in reduced susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage at 6 months of age. As the diaphragm is the mouse muscle most representative of human disease, these results provide impetus for further investigation of therapeutic strategies aimed at enhanced cytosolic calcium removal.
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Myostatin is upregulated following stress in an Erk-dependent manner and negatively regulates cardiomyocyte growth in culture and in a mouse model.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2010
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Myostatin is well established as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, but its role in the heart is controversial. Our goal in this study was to characterize myostatin regulation following cardiomyocyte stress and to examine the role of myostatin in the regulation of cardiomyocyte size. Neonatal cardiomyocytes were cultured and stressed with phenylephrine. Adenovirus was used to overexpress myostatin or dominant negative myostatin in culture. Adeno-associated virus was used to overexpress myostatin or dominant negative myostatin in mice. Myostatin is upregulated following cardiomyocyte stress in an Erk-dependent manner that is associated with increased nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of MEF-2. Myostatin overexpression leads to decreased and myostatin inhibition to increased cardiac growth both in vitro and in vivo due to modulation of Akt and NFAT3 pathways. Myostatin is a negative regulator of cardiac growth, and further studies are warranted to investigate the role of myostatin in the healthy and failing heart.
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Systemic myostatin inhibition via liver-targeted gene transfer in normal and dystrophic mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2010
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Myostatin inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy to maintain muscle mass in a variety of disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, cachexia, and sarcopenia. Previously described approaches to blocking myostatin signaling include injection delivery of inhibitory propeptide domain or neutralizing antibodies.
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Rescue of dystrophic skeletal muscle by PGC-1? involves a fast to slow fiber type shift in the mdx mouse.
PLoS ONE
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Increased utrophin expression is known to reduce pathology in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles. Transgenic over-expression of PGC-1? has been shown to increase levels of utrophin mRNA and improve the histology of mdx muscles. Other reports have shown that PGC-1? signaling can lead to increased oxidative capacity and a fast to slow fiber type shift. Given that it has been shown that slow fibers produce and maintain more utrophin than fast skeletal muscle fibers, we hypothesized that over-expression of PGC-1? in post-natal mdx mice would increase utrophin levels via a fiber type shift, resulting in more slow, oxidative fibers that are also more resistant to contraction-induced damage. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mdx mice were injected with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) driving expression of PGC-1?. PGC-1? over-expression resulted in increased utrophin and type I myosin heavy chain expression as well as elevated mitochondrial protein expression. Muscles were shown to be more resistant to contraction-induced damage and more fatigue resistant. Sirt-1 was increased while p38 activation and NRF-1 were reduced in PGC-1? over-expressing muscle when compared to control. We also evaluated if the use a pharmacological PGC-1? pathway activator, resveratrol, could drive the same physiological changes. Resveratrol administration (100 mg/kg/day) resulted in improved fatigue resistance, but did not achieve significant increases in utrophin expression. These data suggest that the PGC-1? pathway is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in dystrophic skeletal muscle.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.