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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches are needed to minimize relapse risk and long-term transplant morbidity in this population.
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Second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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We examined risk of second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) using reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMC). RIC/NMC recipients with leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 2833) and lymphoma (n = 1436) between 1995 and 2006 were included. In addition, RIC/NMC recipients 40 to 60 years of age (n = 2138) were compared with patients of the same age receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC, n = 6428). The cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 3.35% at 10 years. There was no increase in overall cancer risk compared with the general population (leukemia/MDS: standardized incidence ratio [SIR] .99, P = 1.00; lymphoma: SIR .92, P = .75). However, risks were significantly increased in leukemia/MDS patients for cancers of lip (SIR 14.28), tonsil (SIR 8.66), oropharynx (SIR 46.70), bone (SIR 23.53), soft tissue (SIR 12.92), and vulva (SIR 18.55) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.04). Lymphoma patients had significantly higher risks of oropharyngeal cancer (SIR 67.35) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.52). Among RIC/NMC recipients, age >50 years was the only independent risk factor for solid cancers (hazard ratio [HR] 3.02, P < .001). Among patients ages 40 to 60 years, when adjusted for other factors, there was no difference in cancer risks between RIC/NMC and MAC in leukemia/MDS patients (HR .98, P = .905). In lymphoma patients, risks were lower after RIC/NMC (HR .51, P = .047). In conclusion, the overall risks of second solid cancers in RIC/NMC recipients are similar to the general population, although there is an increased risk of cancer at some sites. Studies with longer follow-up are needed to realize the complete risks of solid cancers after RIC/NMC AHCT.
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Transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison of outcomes with reduced intensity and myeloablative regimens.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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The safety and efficacy of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens for the treatment of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is unknown. We compared the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in children with acute myeloid leukemia using RIC regimens with those receiving myeloablative-conditioning (MAC) regimens. A total of 180 patients were evaluated (39 with RIC and 141 with MAC regimens). Results of univariate and multivariate analysis showed no significant differences in the rates of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, leukemia-free, and overall survival between treatment groups. The 5-year probabilities of overall survival with RIC and MAC regimens were 45% and 48%, respectively (P = .99). Moreover, relapse rates were not higher with RIC compared with MAC regimens (39% vs 39%; P = .95), and recipients of MAC regimens were not at higher risk for transplant-related mortality compared with recipients of RIC regimens (16% vs 16%; P = .73). After carefully controlled analyses, we found that in this relatively modest study population, the data supported a role for RIC regimens for acute myeloid leukemia in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. The data also provided justification for designing a carefully controlled randomized clinical trial that examines the efficacy of regimen intensity in this population.
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SNX10 mutations define a subgroup of human autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with variable clinical severity.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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Human Autosomal Recessive Osteopetrosis (ARO) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by reduced bone resorption by osteoclasts. In 2000, we found that mutations in the TCIRG1 gene encoding for a subunit of the proton pump (V-ATPase) are responsible for more than one-half of ARO cases. Since then, five additional genes have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, leaving approximately 25% of cases that could not be associated with a genotype. Very recently, a mutation in the sorting nexin 10 (SNX10) gene, whose product is suggested to interact with the proton pump, has been found in 3 consanguineous families of Palestinian origin, thus adding a new candidate gene in patients not previously classified. Here we report the identification of 9 novel mutations in this gene in 14 ARO patients from 12 unrelated families of different geographic origin. Interestingly, we define the molecular defect in three cases of "Västerbottenian osteopetrosis," named for the Swedish Province where a higher incidence of the disease has been reported. In our cohort of more than 310 patients from all over the world, SNX10-dependent ARO constitutes 4% of the cases, with a frequency comparable to the receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL), receptor activator of NF-?B (RANK) and osteopetrosis-associated transmembrane protein 1 (OSTM1)-dependent subsets. Although the clinical presentation is relatively variable in severity, bone seems to be the only affected tissue and the defect can be almost completely rescued by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). These results confirm the involvement of the SNX10 gene in human ARO and identify a new subset with a relatively favorable prognosis as compared to TCIRG1-dependent cases. Further analyses will help to better understand the role of SNX10 in osteoclast physiology and verify whether this protein might be considered a new target for selective antiresorptive therapies.
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Therapeutic in vivo selection of thymic-derived natural T regulatory cells following non-myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant for IPEX.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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FOXP3 is critical for the development and function of CD4(+)CD25(bright) natural regulatory T cells (nTreg). Individuals harboring mutations in FOXP3 develop immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome (IPEX). We describe a child diagnosed with IPEX who underwent a reduced intensity, T and B cell depleted, matched unrelated donor bone marrow transplant followed by clinical resolution. Using lineage-specific donor chimerism studies, we demonstrate that non-myeloablative HSCT resolves disease in the context of low level donor hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment. Despite low-levels of donor HSC, thymically-derived nTreg and to a lesser extent CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, exhibit a selective in vivo growth advantage for populations containing a functional FOXP3 gene. Moreover, nTreg from this patient show regulatory function directly ex vivo. These results have implications for improving clinical therapy for patients with IPEX and provide mechanistic insight into the in vivo development of human nTreg and unexpectedly, non-regulatory T cells.
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Outcomes of pediatric bone marrow transplantation for leukemia and myelodysplasia using matched sibling, mismatched related, or matched unrelated donors.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
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Although some trials have allowed matched or single human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donors (mmRDs) along with HLA-matched sibling donors (MSDs) for pediatric bone marrow transplantation in early-stage hematologic malignancies, whether mmRD grafts lead to similar outcomes is not known. We compared patients < 18 years old reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic T-replete, myeloablative bone marrow transplantation between 1993 and 2006. In total, patients receiving bone marrow from 1208 MSDs, 266 8/8 allelic-matched unrelated donors (URDs), and 151 0-1 HLA-antigen mmRDs were studied. Multivariate analysis showed that recipients of MSD transplants had less transplantation-related mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and chronic GVHD, along with better disease-free and overall survival than the URD and mmRD groups. No differences were observed in transplant-related mortality, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival between the mmRD and URD groups. These data show that mmRD and 8/8 URD outcomes are similar, whereas MSD outcomes are superior to the other 2 sources. Whether allele level typing could identify mmRD recipients with better outcomes will not be known unless centers alter practice and type mmRD at the allele level.
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1?,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D3) catalyzes suppressive activity on human natural regulatory T cells, uniquely modulates cell cycle progression, and augments FOXP3.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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Human natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) show great promise for therapeutically modulating immune-mediated disease, but remain poorly understood. One explanation under intense scrutiny is how to induce suppressive function in non-nTregs and increase the size of the regulatory population. A second possibility would be to make existing nTregs more effective, like a catalyst raises the specific activity of an enzyme. The latter has been difficult to investigate due to the lack of a robust short-term suppression assay. Using a microassay described herein we demonstrate that nTregs in distinct phases of cell cycle progression exhibit graded degrees of potency. Moreover, we show that physiological concentrations of 1?,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D3) boosts nTregs function. The enhanced suppressive capacity is likely due to vitamin D3s ability to uniquely modulate cell cycle progression and elevate FOXP3 expression. These data suggest a role for vitamin D3 as a mechanism for catalyzing potency of nTregs.
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Iron overload in survivors of childhood leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Iron overload has not been studied extensively and prospectively in pediatric survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); therefore, we conducted a prospective long-term study of 133 survivors of childhood leukemia to assess the incidence of and risk factors for iron overload and to investigate its association with organ dysfunction. One yr after HSCT, the mean serum ferritin level was 1158 ng/mL (range, 22-3264 ng/mL), with 124 patients (93.2%) having a serum ferritin level that exceeded the upper limit of the normal range (110 ng/mL). Thereafter, the serum ferritin level declined over time. There was a positive correlation between the level of serum ferritin and that of total bilirubin (r = 0.21, p < 0.001) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (r = 0.17, p < 0.001). A high concentration of serum ferritin was associated with low cardiac fractional shortening (r = -0.15, p = 0.047). In addition, patients with hypothyroidism and GH deficiency had a higher level of serum ferritin than those without (p < 0.02). We conclude that iron overload is common after HSCT and is associated with hepatic, cardiac, and endocrine dysfunction.
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Bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia secondary to temozolomide.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2009
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Radiotherapy (RT) and concomitant/adjuvant therapy with temozolomide (Temodar) is a common treatment regimen for children and adults with glioma. Although temozolomide is generally well tolerated with temporary myelosuppression as the primary dose-limiting toxicity, irreversible bone-marrow aplasia after treatment with temozolomide has been reported. We report the case of an adolescent patient with a high-grade glioma who, after >2 years of event-free survival, underwent successful bone marrow transplantation for treatment of temozolomide-induced severe aplastic anemia (SAA).
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A pilot study of risk-adapted radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with supratentorial PNET.
Neuro-oncology
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2009
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We undertook this study to estimate the event-free survival (EFS) of patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with additional radiation to the primary tumor site and subsequent high-dose chemotherapy supported by stem cell rescue. Between 1996 and 2003, 16 patients with SPNET were enrolled. High-risk (HR) disease was differentiated from average-risk (AR) disease by the presence of residual tumor (M(0) and tumor size > 1.5 cm(2)) or disseminated disease in the neuraxis (M(1)-M(3)). Patients received risk-adapted CSI: those with AR disease received 23.4 Gy; those with HR disease, 36-39.6 Gy. The tumor bed received a total of 55.8 Gy. Subsequently, all patients received four cycles of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine with stem cell support. The median age at diagnosis was 7.9 years; eight patients were female. Seven patients had pineal PNET. Twelve patients are alive at a median follow-up of 5.4 years. The 5-year EFS and overall survival (OS) estimates for all patients were 68% +/- 14% and 73% +/- 13%. The 5-year EFS and OS estimates were 75% +/- 17% and 88% +/- 13%, respectively, for the eight patients with AR disease and 60% +/- 19% and 58% +/- 19%, respectively, for the eight with HR disease. No deaths were due to toxicity. High-dose cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy with stem cell support after risk-adapted CSI results in excellent EFS estimates for patients with newly diagnosed AR SPNET. Further, this chemotherapy allows for a reduction in the dose of CSI used to treat AR SPNET without compromising EFS.
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Clinical utility of computed tomography screening of chest, abdomen, and sinuses before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the St. Jude experience.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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All allogeneic (allo) and autologous (auto) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital undergo pre-HSCT computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses, chest, and abdomen because they are at significant risk for opportunistic infections. We studied whether this extensive routine imaging is warranted to detect infection despite the risk of additional radiation exposure. We reviewed the medical records of all children receiving allo- and auto-HSCT at St. Jude in 2004 and 2005. Of the 184 eligible patients who received 187 transplants, 131 received allografts and 56 autografts. Solid tumors and lymphomas were removed from the final analysis of the chest and abdomen CT as this imaging is typically warranted as part of disease restaging; thus, 111 allogeneic participants were included in this analysis. Both auto- and allo-recipients were evaluated by sinus CT and included in this final analysis. Most allo- and auto-HSCT recipients (> or =80%) did not have sinus, pulmonary, cardiac, or gastrointestinal symptoms; >85% of the evaluable allo-recipients had no prior fungal infection. Eighty-eight allo- and 31 auto-HSCT recipients had abnormal sinus CT findings, all unrelated to the underlying disease. Sixty-two (55.9%) of the allo-recipients had normal chest CT and 85 (76.6%) had normal abdominal CT. Of the 18 allo-recipients who began new therapy based on these findings, only 2 (11.1%) were related to chest CT findings and the other 16 were related to sinus findings. Our findings suggest that pre-HSCT routine CT imaging of the abdomen may not be warranted in a subset of allogeneic recipients who are asymptomatic and without previous infectious findings. Thus, these patients may be spared unnecessary radiation exposure. Recipients undergoing auto-HSCT or allo-HSCT for lymphomas or solid tumors will routinely undergo chest and abdominal CT imaging as part of their disease evaluation. The decision to perform chest CT should be made judiciously based on a careful history and physical examination. Sinus imaging, which was frequently abnormal, may be justified in all patients to plan post-HSCT care.
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Total and active rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG;Thymoglobulin) pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients undergoing unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; Thymoglobulin) is currently used to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The dose and schedule of rATG as part of the preparative regimen for unrelated donor (URD) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) have not been optimized in pediatric patients. We conducted a prospective study of 13 pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing URD BMT at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital from October 2003 to March 2005, to determine the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of active and total rATG. The conditioning regimen comprised total body irradiation (TBI), thiotepa, and cyclophosphamide (Cy); cyclosporine (CsA) and methotrexate (MTX) were administered as GVHD prophylaxis. Patients received a total dose of 10 mg/kg rATG, and serial blood samples were assayed for total rATG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and active rATG by florescein activated cell sorting (FACS). We found that our weight-based dosing regimen for rATG was effective and well tolerated by patients. The half-lives of total and active rATG were comparable to those from previous studies, and despite high doses our patients had low maximum concentrations of active and total rATG. There were no occurrences of grade iii-iv GVHD even in patients having low peak rATG levels, and the overall incidence of grade II GVHD was only 15%. None of the patients had serious infections following transplantation. These data support the use of a 10 mg/kg dose of rATG in children with hematologic malignancies because it can be administered without increasing the risk of graft rejection, or serious infection in pediatric patients with a low rate of GVHD. These conclusions may not apply to patients with nonmalignant disorders.
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Late effects in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients with acquired severe aplastic anemia: a report from the late effects working committee of the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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With improvements in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes for severe aplastic anemia (SAA), there is a growing population of SAA survivors after HCT. However, there is a paucity of information regarding late effects that occur after HCT in SAA survivors. This study describes the malignant and nonmalignant late effects in survivors with SAA after HCT. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 1718 patients post-HCT for acquired SAA between 1995 and 2006 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The prevalence and cumulative incidence estimates of late effects are reported for 1-year HCT survivors with SAA. Of the HCT recipients, 1176 (68.5%) and 542 (31.5%) patients underwent a matched sibling donor (MSD) or unrelated donor (URD) HCT, respectively. The median age at the time of HCT was 20 years. The median interval from diagnosis to transplantation was 3 months for MSD HCT and 14 months for URD HCT. The median follow-up was 70 months and 67 months for MSD and URD HCT survivors, respectively. Overall survival at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years for the entire cohort was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74-78), 73% (95% CI: 71-75), and 70% (95% CI: 68-72). Among 1-year survivors of MSD HCT, 6% had 1 late effect and 1% had multiple late effects. For 1-year survivors of URD HCT, 13% had 1 late effect and 2% had multiple late effects. Among survivors of MSD HCT, the cumulative incidence estimates of developing late effects were all <3% and did not increase over time. In contrast, for recipients of URD HCT, the cumulative incidence of developing several late effects exceeded 3% by 5 years: gonadal dysfunction 10.5% (95% CI: 7.3-14.3), growth disturbance 7.2% (95% CI: 4.4-10.7), avascular necrosis 6.3% (95% CI: 3.6-9.7), hypothyroidism 5.5% (95% CI: 2.8-9.0), and cataracts 5.1% (95% CI: 2.9-8.0). Our results indicated that all patients undergoing HCT for SAA remain at risk for late effects, must be counseled about, and should be monitored for late effects for the remainder of their lives.
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Phase I study of the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of palifermin in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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The maximum tolerated dose of palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, in children is not known, and its pharmacokinetics in this population has not been well studied. This is a phase I study of palifermin was designed to evaluate its tolerability at doses of 40, 60, and 90 ?g/kg/day in children age 2-18 years of age, receiving a myeloablative preparative regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In each cohort, palifermin was given for 3 consecutive days before the preparative regimen and for 3 days after the stem cell infusion. Twelve patients were enrolled. Palifermin 90 ?g/kg/day was tolerated in 6 patients without dose-limiting toxicity. All patients had at least 1 adverse event, mostly National Cancer Institute grade 1 or 2 severity. Skin rash, grade 2 or lower, was the most common adverse event, seen in 67% of patients. Only 3 patients (25%) had mucositis. The area under the concentration-time curve increased proportionally to the dose, and approximately 97% of palifermin exposure occurred in the first 24 hours after administration. Palifermin clearance increased linearly with body weight, supporting dosing by body weight. The mean clearance was 1893 mL/hour/kg, and it did not change significantly between administration of the first and last doses (P = .80). The mean elimination half-life was 4.6 hours. Our data show that palifermin was tolerated at a dose of 90 ?g/kg/day, and exhibits linear pharmacokinetics in children undergoing allogeneic HSCT.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.