JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Integrated genomic and epigenomic analysis of breast cancer brain metastasis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The brain is a common site of metastatic disease in patients with breast cancer, which has few therapeutic options and dismal outcomes. The purpose of our study was to identify common and rare events that underlie breast cancer brain metastasis. We performed deep genomic profiling, which integrated gene copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation datasets on a collection of breast brain metastases. We identified frequent large chromosomal gains in 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, and 20q and frequent broad-level deletions involving 8p, 17p, 21p and Xq. Frequently amplified and overexpressed genes included ATAD2, BRAF, DERL1, DNMTRB and NEK2A. The ATM, CRYAB and HSPB2 genes were commonly deleted and underexpressed. Knowledge mining revealed enrichment in cell cycle and G2/M transition pathways, which contained AURKA, AURKB and FOXM1. Using the PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic classifier, Luminal B, Her2+/ER negative, and basal-like tumors were identified as the most commonly represented breast cancer subtypes in our brain metastasis cohort. While overall methylation levels were increased in breast cancer brain metastasis, basal-like brain metastases were associated with significantly lower levels of methylation. Integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed defects in cell migration and adhesion due to hypermethylation and downregulation of PENK, EDN3, and ITGAM. Hypomethylation and upregulation of KRT8 likely affects adhesion and permeability. Genomic and epigenomic profiling of breast brain metastasis has provided insight into the somatic events underlying this disease, which have potential in forming the basis of future therapeutic strategies.
Related JoVE Video
Dasatinib, a small molecule inhibitor of the Src kinase, reduces the growth and activates apoptosis in pre-neoplastic Barretts esophagus cell lines: evidence for a noninvasive treatment of high-grade dysplasia.
J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Only local ablation (radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy) or esophagectomy currently is available to treat high-grade dysplasia in Barretts esophagus. Alternative treatments, specifically chemopreventive strategies, are lacking. Our understanding of the molecular changes of high-grade dysplasia in Barretts esophagus offers an opportunity to inhibit neoplastic progression of high-grade dysplasia in Barretts esophagus. Increased activity of the Src kinase and deregulation of the tumor suppressor p27 are features of malignant cells and high-grade dysplasia in Barretts esophagus. Src phosphorylates p27, inhibiting its regulatory function and increasing cell growth and proliferation. We hypothesized that a small molecule inhibitor of Src might reduce the growth and reverse Src-mediated deregulation of p27 in Barretts esophagus cells.
Related JoVE Video
miRNA expression profiling in migrating glioblastoma cells: regulation of cell migration and invasion by miR-23b via targeting of Pyk2.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common and lethal type of primary brain tumor. Clinical outcome remains poor and is essentially palliative due to the highly invasive nature of the disease. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive glioma invasion is required to limit dispersion of malignant glioma cells.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.