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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Relevance of Campylobacter to public health-The need for a One Health approach.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2014
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Campylobacter species belong to the most important foodborne bacteria which cause gastroenteritis in humans in both developed and developing countries. With increasing reporting rates, the public awareness towards Campylobacter infections is growing continuously. This strengthens the necessity to establish intervention measures for prevention and control of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. along the food chain, as in particular poultry and poultry meat represent a major source of human infections. An interdisciplinary One Health approach and a combined effort of all stakeholders are necessary to ultimately reduce the burden of campylobacteriosis cases in humans. Numerous studies point out, however, that at present a complete elimination of Campylobacter in the food chain is not feasible. The present aim should therefore be to establish control measures and intervention strategies to minimize the occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in livestock (e.g. poultry flocks) and to reduce the quantitative Campylobacter burden in animals and foods. To this end, a combination of intervention methods at different stages of the food chain appears most promising. That has to be accompanied by targeted consumer advice and education campaigns to raise the awareness towards Campylobacter infections.
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Trends in surveillance data of human Lyme borreliosis from six federal states in eastern Germany, 2009-2012.
Ticks Tick Borne Dis
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most frequent vector-borne disease in Germany. For more than 10 years, data from mandatory notifications have been available from 6 federal states in the eastern part of Germany. A common case definition was applied. Clinical manifestations of erythema migrans, neuroborreliosis (radiculoneuritis, cranial neuritis, meningitis), and Lyme arthritis were notifiable. From 2009 to 2012, altogether 18,894 cases were notified. The overall incidence varied between 34.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 2009 and 19.54 cases/100,000 persons in 2012. LB in eastern Germany showed a pronounced seasonality with a peak in August. Decreasing as well as increasing trends were observed in different federal states. Females predominated among all cases (55.3%). The age distribution was bimodal with incidence peaks in children 5-9 years old (32.4 cases/100,000 persons in 2011) and in adults aged 60-69 years (56.7 cases/100,000 persons in 2011). Erythema migrans affected 95.4% of the patients and acute neuroborreliosis 3.3%. Among the latter, the most common manifestation was radiculoneuritis (n=316). Neuritis cranialis was more common in children than in adults (p<0.01). The same was true for meningitis (p<0.01). Altogether 2.0% of the LB cases developed Lyme arthritis. LB has a significant disease burden in the study area. Different levels of under-ascertainment in the surveillance system could explain parts of the differences in the incidence. Furthermore, there may be discrepancies in disease awareness among patients and physicians. Changes in time and differences among geographical regions could result from variations in risk factors related to human behaviour (e.g., outdoor activity). Additionally, vector-related risk factors may have varied (e.g., landscape, climate). Public health strategies with a particular focus on the high-incidence age groups should promote daily checks for ticks and prompt removal of ticks after exposure to avoid infection. Physicians should be able to recognize LB patients with early manifestations and promptly treat those appropriately.
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Harmonization of study and reference data by PhaseLift: saving time when imputing study data.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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Genome-wide association studies are usually accompanied by imputation techniques to complement genome-wide SNP chip genotypes. Current imputation approaches separate the phasing of study data from imputing, which makes the phasing independent from the reference data. The two-step approach allows for updating the imputation for a new reference panel without repeating the tedious phasing step. This advantage, however, does no longer hold, when the build of the study data differs from the build of the reference data. In this case, the current approach is to harmonize the study data annotation with the reference data (prephasing lift-over), requiring rephasing and re-imputing. As a novel approach, we propose to harmonize study haplotypes with reference haplotypes (postphasing lift-over). This allows for updating imputed study data for new reference panels without requiring rephasing. With continuously updated reference panels, our approach can save considerable computing time of up to 1 month per re-imputation. We evaluated the rephasing and postphasing lift-over approaches by using data from 1,644 unrelated individuals imputed by both approaches and comparing it with directly typed genotypes. On average, both approaches perform equally well with mean concordances of 93% between imputed and typed genotypes for both approaches. Also, imputation qualities are similar (mean difference in RSQ < 0.1%). We demonstrate that our novel postphasing lift-over approach is a practical and time-saving alternative to the prephasing lift-over. This might encourage study partners to accommodate updated reference builds and ultimately improve the information content of study data. Our novel approach is implemented in the software PhaseLift.
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Epidemiology of campylobacteriosis in Germany - insights from 10 years of surveillance.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Campylobacteriosis caused by Campylobacter spp. is the most common notifiable bacterial gastrointestinal disease in Germany and a major problem in many other European countries as well. In contrast to other infectious diseases, e.g., salmonellosis, the annual number of notified campylobacteriosis cases has increased in Germany and other European countries from 2001-2010.
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N-cadherin promoter polymorphisms and risk of osteoarthritis.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2013
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Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. It is characterized by cartilage destruction and bone remodeling, mediated in part by synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Given the functional significance of cadherins in these cells, we aimed at determining the role of genetic variants of N-cadherin (CDH2) in OA of the knee and hip. Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genomic region of the CDH2 gene were genotyped in 312 patients with OA and 259 healthy control subjects. Gene expression of CDH2 was analyzed by qRT-PCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify a transcription factor isolated by DNA pulldown. Its potential for binding to gene variants was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Genetic analysis identified a polymorphism located in the CDH2 promoter region to be associated with risk of OA. The minor allele of rs11564299 had a protective effect against OA. Compared to carriers of the major allele, carriers of the minor allele of rs11564299 displayed increased N-cadherin levels in SFs. Based on in silico analysis, the minor allele was predicted to generate a novel transcription factor binding site, Direct-binding assays and mass spectrometric analysis identified hnRNP K as binding selectively to the minor allele. In summary, a CDH2 promoter polymorphism influences the risk of OA, and hnRNP K was found to be involved in the regulation of elevated N-cadherin expression in patients with OA carrying the minor allele of rs11564299.-Ruedel, A., Stark, K., Kaufmann, S., Bauer, R., Reinders, J., Rovensky, J., BlaŽi?ková, S., Oefner, P. J., Bosserhoff, A. K. N-cadherin promoter polymorphisms and risk of osteoarthritis.
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Dysfunctional nitric oxide signalling increases risk of myocardial infarction.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2013
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Myocardial infarction, a leading cause of death in the Western world, usually occurs when the fibrous cap overlying an atherosclerotic plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. The resulting exposure of blood to the atherosclerotic material then triggers thrombus formation, which occludes the artery. The importance of genetic predisposition to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is best documented by the predictive value of a positive family history. Next-generation sequencing in families with several affected individuals has revolutionized mutation identification. Here we report the segregation of two private, heterozygous mutations in two functionally related genes, GUCY1A3 (p.Leu163Phefs*24) and CCT7 (p.Ser525Leu), in an extended myocardial infarction family. GUCY1A3 encodes the ?1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase (?1-sGC), and CCT7 encodes CCT?, a member of the tailless complex polypeptide 1 ring complex, which, among other functions, stabilizes soluble guanylyl cyclase. After stimulation with nitric oxide, soluble guanylyl cyclase generates cGMP, which induces vasodilation and inhibits platelet activation. We demonstrate in vitro that mutations in both GUCY1A3 and CCT7 severely reduce ?1-sGC as well as ?1-sGC protein content, and impair soluble guanylyl cyclase activity. Moreover, platelets from digenic mutation carriers contained less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein and consequently displayed reduced nitric-oxide-induced cGMP formation. Mice deficient in ?1-sGC protein displayed accelerated thrombus formation in the microcirculation after local trauma. Starting with a severely affected family, we have identified a link between impaired soluble-guanylyl-cyclase-dependent nitric oxide signalling and myocardial infarction risk, possibly through accelerated thrombus formation. Reversing this defect may provide a new therapeutic target for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.
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Increase in West Nile virus infections imported to Germany in 2012.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Following the first confirmed imported West Nile virus (WNV) infection in 2011, the number of imported WNV infections to Germany increased in 2012. Two cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) and two cases of West Nile fever (WNF) were reported. The WNND cases were imported from Montenegro and Greece, including the first fatal case for Germany. The WNF cases were imported from Tunisia and Egypt. The cases were unambiguously confirmed according to laboratory criteria of European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). In this report we summarize the clinical and laboratory findings in order to sensitize physicians in Germany for this imported viral disease.
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Long-term pattern of brain natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and its determinants in the general population: contribution of age, gender, and cardiac and extra-cardiac factors.
Eur. J. Heart Fail.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2013
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The natriuretic peptides BNP and NT-proBNP are potent cardiac markers, but knowledge of long-term changes is sparse. We thus quantified determinants of change in BNP and NT-proBNP in a study of south German residents (KORA).
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Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture.
Sonja I Berndt, Stefan Gustafsson, Reedik Mägi, Andrea Ganna, Eleanor Wheeler, Mary F Feitosa, Anne E Justice, Keri L Monda, Damien C Croteau-Chonka, Felix R Day, Tonu Esko, Tove Fall, Teresa Ferreira, Davide Gentilini, Anne U Jackson, Jian'an Luan, Joshua C Randall, Sailaja Vedantam, Cristen J Willer, Thomas W Winkler, Andrew R Wood, Tsegaselassie Workalemahu, Yi-Juan Hu, Sang Hong Lee, Liming Liang, Dan-Yu Lin, Josine L Min, Benjamin M Neale, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Jian Yang, Eva Albrecht, Najaf Amin, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Gemma Cadby, Martin den Heijer, Niina Eklund, Krista Fischer, Anuj Goel, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Jennifer E Huffman, Ivonne Jarick, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Stavroula Kanoni, Marcus E Kleber, Inke R König, Kati Kristiansson, Zoltan Kutalik, Claudia Lamina, Cécile Lecoeur, Guo Li, Massimo Mangino, Wendy L McArdle, Carolina Medina-Gomez, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Julius S Ngwa, Ilja M Nolte, Lavinia Paternoster, Sonali Pechlivanis, Markus Perola, Marjolein J Peters, Michael Preuss, Lynda M Rose, Jianxin Shi, Dmitry Shungin, Albert Vernon Smith, Rona J Strawbridge, Ida Surakka, Alexander Teumer, Mieke D Trip, Jonathan Tyrer, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Liesbeth Vandenput, Lindsay L Waite, Jing Hua Zhao, Devin Absher, Folkert W Asselbergs, Mustafa Atalay, Antony P Attwood, Anthony J Balmforth, Hanneke Basart, John Beilby, Lori L Bonnycastle, Paolo Brambilla, Marcel Bruinenberg, Harry Campbell, Daniel I Chasman, Peter S Chines, Francis S Collins, John M Connell, William O Cookson, Ulf de Faire, Femmie de Vegt, Mariano Dei, Maria Dimitriou, Sarah Edkins, Karol Estrada, David M Evans, Martin Farrall, Marco M Ferrario, Jean Ferrières, Lude Franke, Francesca Frau, Pablo V Gejman, Harald Grallert, Henrik Grönberg, Vilmundur Gudnason, Alistair S Hall, Per Hall, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Nancy L Heard-Costa, Andrew C Heath, Johannes Hebebrand, Georg Homuth, Frank B Hu, Sarah E Hunt, Elina Hyppönen, Carlos Iribarren, Kevin B Jacobs, John-Olov Jansson, Antti Jula, Mika Kähönen, Sekar Kathiresan, Frank Kee, Kay-Tee Khaw, Mika Kivimäki, Wolfgang Koenig, Aldi T Kraja, Meena Kumari, Kari Kuulasmaa, Johanna Kuusisto, Jaana H Laitinen, Timo A Lakka, Claudia Langenberg, Lenore J Launer, Lars Lind, Jaana Lindström, Jianjun Liu, Antonio Liuzzi, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Mattias Lorentzon, Pamela A Madden, Patrik K Magnusson, Paolo Manunta, Diana Marek, Winfried März, Irene Mateo Leach, Barbara McKnight, Sarah E Medland, Evelin Mihailov, Lili Milani, Grant W Montgomery, Vincent Mooser, Thomas W Mühleisen, Patricia B Munroe, Arthur W Musk, Narisu Narisu, Gerjan Navis, George Nicholson, Ellen A Nohr, Ken K Ong, Ben A Oostra, Colin N A Palmer, Aarno Palotie, John F Peden, Nancy Pedersen, Annette Peters, Ozren Polašek, Anneli Pouta, Peter P Pramstaller, Inga Prokopenko, Carolin Pütter, Aparna Radhakrishnan, Olli Raitakari, Augusto Rendon, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Timo E Saaristo, Jennifer G Sambrook, Alan R Sanders, Serena Sanna, Jouko Saramies, Sabine Schipf, Stefan Schreiber, Heribert Schunkert, So-Youn Shin, Stefano Signorini, Juha Sinisalo, Boris Skrobek, Nicole Soranzo, Alena Stančáková, Klaus Stark, Jonathan C Stephens, Kathleen Stirrups, Ronald P Stolk, Michael Stumvoll, Amy J Swift, Eirini V Theodoraki, Barbara Thorand, David-Alexandre Trégouët, Elena Tremoli, Melanie M van der Klauw, Joyce B J van Meurs, Sita H Vermeulen, Jorma Viikari, Jarmo Virtamo, Veronique Vitart, Gérard Waeber, Zhaoming Wang, Elisabeth Widén, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Bernhard R Winkelmann, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Andrew Wong, Alan F Wright, M Carola Zillikens, Philippe Amouyel, Bernhard O Boehm, Eric Boerwinkle, Dorret I Boomsma, Mark J Caulfield, Stephen J Chanock, L Adrienne Cupples, Daniele Cusi, George V Dedoussis, Jeanette Erdmann, Johan G Eriksson, Paul W Franks, Philippe Froguel, Christian Gieger, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Tamara B Harris, Christian Hengstenberg, Andrew A Hicks, Aroon Hingorani, Anke Hinney, Albert Hofman, Kees G Hovingh, Kristian Hveem, Thomas Illig, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Sirkka M Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Diana Kuh, Markku Laakso, Terho Lehtimäki, Douglas F Levinson, Nicholas G Martin, Andres Metspalu, Andrew D Morris, Markku S Nieminen, Inger Njølstad, Claes Ohlsson, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Willem H Ouwehand, Lyle J Palmer, Brenda Penninx, Chris Power, Michael A Province, Bruce M Psaty, Lu Qi, Rainer Rauramaa, Paul M Ridker, Samuli Ripatti, Veikko Salomaa, Nilesh J Samani, Harold Snieder, Thorkild I A Sørensen, Timothy D Spector, Kari Stefansson, Anke Tönjes, Jaakko Tuomilehto, André G Uitterlinden, Matti Uusitupa, Pim van der Harst, Peter Vollenweider, Henri Wallaschofski, Nicholas J Wareham, Hugh Watkins, H-Erich Wichmann, James F Wilson, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Themistocles L Assimes, Inês Barroso, Michael Boehnke, Ingrid B Borecki, Panos Deloukas, Caroline S Fox, Timothy Frayling, Leif C Groop, Talin Haritunian, Iris M Heid, David Hunter, Robert C Kaplan, Fredrik Karpe, Miriam F Moffatt, Karen L Mohlke, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Yudi Pawitan, Eric E Schadt, David Schlessinger, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, David P Strachan, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Cornelia M van Duijn, Peter M Visscher, Anna Maria Di Blasio, Joel N Hirschhorn, Cecilia M Lindgren, Andrew P Morris, David Meyre, André Scherag, Mark I McCarthy, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Kari E North, Ruth J F Loos, Erik Ingelsson.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.
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Clinical aspects and self-reported symptoms of sequelae of Yersinia enterocolitica infections in a population-based study, Germany 2009-2010.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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Foodborne Yersinia enterocolitica infections continue to be a public health problem in many countries. Consumption of raw or undercooked pork is the main risk factor for yersiniosis in Germany. Small children are most frequently affected by yersiniosis. In older children and young adults, symptoms of disease may resemble those of appendicitis and may lead to hospitalization and potentially unnecessary appendectomies. Y. enterocolitica infections may also cause sequelae such as reactive arthritis (ReA), erythema nodosum (EN), and conjunctivitis.
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Expression pattern in human macrophages dependent on 9p21.3 coronary artery disease risk locus.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Genome-wide association studies identified a risk haplotype on chromosome 9p21.3 to be associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Since this region does not contain a clear candidate gene with known pathophysiology, we performed a haplotype-specific expression study in human macrophages during pro-inflammatory stimulation to investigate the locus-dependent expression patterns in a model of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause for CAD and MI.
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Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 Is More Likely to Lead to Hospitalization and Death than Non-O157 Serogroups - Except O104.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The clinical spectrum following infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is wide ranging and includes hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Severity of STEC illness depends on patients age and strongly on the infecting strains virulence. Serogroup O157 is often assumed to be more virulent than others. Age-adjusted population-based data supporting this view are lacking thus far. We conducted a large retrospective cohort study among patients of community-acquired gastroenteritis or HUS diagnosed with STEC infection, reported in Germany January 2004 through December 2011. Age-adjusted risks for reported hospitalization and death, as proxies for disease severity, were estimated for STEC serogroups separately, and compared with STEC O157 (reference group) using Poisson regression models with robust error estimation. A total of 8,400 case-patients were included in the analysis; for 2,454 (29%) and 30 (0.4%) hospitalization and death was reported, respectively. Highest risks for hospitalization, adjusted for age and region of residence, were estimated for STEC O104 (68%; risk ratio [RR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.45), followed by STEC O157 (46%). Hospitalization risks for the most prevalent non-O157 serogroups (O26, O103, O91, O145, O128, O111) were consistently and markedly lower than for O157, with the highest RR for O145 (0.54; 95% CI, 0.41-0.70) and the lowest for O103 (0.27; 95% CI, 0.20-0.35). Mortality risk of O104 was similar to O157 (1.2% each), but the group of all other non-O157 STEC had only 1/10 the risk (RR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.02-0.32) compared to O157. The study provides population-based and age-adjusted evidence for the exceptional high virulence of STEC O157 in relation to non-O157 STEC other than O104. Timely diagnosis and surveillance of STEC infections should prioritize HUS-associated E. coli, of which STEC O157 is the most important serogroup.
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Identification and MS-assisted interpretation of genetically influenced NMR signals in human plasma.
Genome Med
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides robust readouts of many metabolic parameters in one experiment. However, identification of clinically relevant markers in 1H NMR spectra is a major challenge. Association of NMR-derived quantities with genetic variants can uncover biologically relevant metabolic traits. Using NMR data of plasma samples from 1,757 individuals from the KORA study together with 655,658 genetic variants, we show that ratios between NMR intensities at two chemical shift positions can provide informative and robust biomarkers. We report seven loci of genetic association with NMR-derived traits (APOA1, CETP, CPS1, GCKR, FADS1, LIPC, PYROXD2) and characterize these traits biochemically using mass spectrometry. These ratios may now be used in clinical studies.
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Genetic associations with lipoprotein subfractions provide information on their biological nature.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2011
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Adverse levels of lipoproteins are highly heritable and constitute risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes. Hitherto, genome-wide association studies revealed 95 lipid-associated loci. However, due to the small effect sizes of these associations large sample numbers (>100 000 samples) were needed. Here we show that analyzing more refined lipid phenotypes, namely lipoprotein subfractions, can increase the number of significantly associated loci compared with bulk high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein analysis in a study with identical sample numbers. Moreover, lipoprotein subfractions provide novel insight into the human lipid metabolism. We measured 15 lipoprotein subfractions (L1-L15) in 1791 samples using (1)H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Using cluster analyses, we quantified inter-relationships among lipoprotein subfractions. Additionally, we analyzed associations with subfractions at known lipid loci. We identified five distinct groups of subfractions: one (L1) was only marginally captured by serum lipids and therefore extends our knowledge of lipoprotein biochemistry. During a lipid-tolerance test, L1 lost its special position. In the association analysis, we found that eight loci (LIPC, CETP, PLTP, FADS1-2-3, SORT1, GCKR, APOB, APOA1) were associated with the subfractions, whereas only four loci (CETP, SORT1, GCKR, APOA1) were associated with serum lipids. For LIPC, we observed a 10-fold increase in the variance explained by our regression models. In conclusion, NMR-based fine mapping of lipoprotein subfractions provides novel information on their biological nature and strengthens the associations with genetic loci. Future clinical studies are now needed to investigate their biomedical relevance.
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German outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 associated with sprouts.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2011
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A large outbreak of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 occurred in Germany in May 2011. The source of infection was undetermined.
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Communicable diseases prioritized for surveillance and epidemiological research: results of a standardized prioritization procedure in Germany, 2011.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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To establish strategic priorities for the German national public health institute (RKI) and guide the institutes mid-term strategic decisions, we prioritized infectious pathogens in accordance with their importance for national surveillance and epidemiological research.
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Epidemic profile of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak in Germany.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2011
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We describe an outbreak of gastroenteritis and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli in Germany in May, June, and July, 2011. The consumption of sprouts was identified as the most likely vehicle of infection.
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A genome-wide association study identifies LIPA as a susceptibility gene for coronary artery disease.
Philipp S Wild, Tanja Zeller, Arne Schillert, Silke Szymczak, Christoph R Sinning, Arne Deiseroth, Renate B Schnabel, Edith Lubos, Till Keller, Medea S Eleftheriadis, Christoph Bickel, Hans J Rupprecht, Sandra Wilde, Heidi Rossmann, Patrick Diemert, L Adrienne Cupples, Claire Perret, Jeanette Erdmann, Klaus Stark, Marcus E Kleber, Stephen E Epstein, Benjamin F Voight, Kari Kuulasmaa, Mingyao Li, Arne S Schäfer, Norman Klopp, Peter S Braund, Hendrik B Sager, Serkalem Demissie, Carole Proust, Inke R König, Heinz-Erich Wichmann, Wibke Reinhard, Michael M Hoffmann, Jarmo Virtamo, Mary Susan Burnett, David Siscovick, Per Gunnar Wiklund, Liming Qu, Nour Eddine El Mokthari, John R Thompson, Annette Peters, Albert V Smith, Emmanuelle Yon, Jens Baumert, Christian Hengstenberg, Winfried März, Philippe Amouyel, Joseph Devaney, Stephen M Schwartz, Olli Saarela, Nehal N Mehta, Diana Rubin, Kaisa Silander, Alistair S Hall, Jean Ferrières, Tamara B Harris, Olle Melander, Frank Kee, Hakon Hakonarson, Juergen Schrezenmeir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Roberto Elosua, Dominique Arveiler, Alun Evans, Daniel J Rader, Thomas Illig, Stefan Schreiber, Joshua C Bis, David Altshuler, Maryam Kavousi, Jaqueline C M Witteman, André G Uitterlinden, Albert Hofman, Aaron R Folsom, Maja Barbalic, Eric Boerwinkle, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Christopher J O'Donnell, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, Francois Cambien, Karl J Lackner, Laurence Tiret, Veikko Salomaa, Thomas Münzel, Andreas Ziegler, Stefan Blankenberg.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD).
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Adiponectin multimeric forms but not total adiponectin levels are associated with myocardial infarction in non-diabetic men.
J. Atheroscler. Thromb.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2011
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Multimer complex formation of adiponectin is recognized as an important mechanism modulating the biological functions of this adipokine, but the role of adiponectin isoforms in myocardial infarction (MI) is still unclear.
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Trends in imported chikungunya virus infections in Germany, 2006-2009.
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2011
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Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been previously reported in many African and Asian areas, but it recently reemerged strongly in countries bordering the Indian Ocean as well as caused an outbreak in northern Italy. In Germany, where potential CHIKV vectors are not yet established, CHIKV infection is mandatorily notifiable. Cases reported from 2006 through 2009 were analyzed for travel characteristics and demographic factors. 152 cases of symptomatic CHIKV infection were notified. Both sexes were affected, with a median age of 46 years. Over the years, countries of infection largely followed the outbreaks reported from various travel destinations. India and the Maldives were the countries of infection most frequently named. In Sri Lanka, India, and Thailand, which are also frequently named countries of infection for dengue virus, the median age of CHIKV-affected patients was higher than that of dengue fever patients. Taking traveler numbers into consideration, risk of CHIKV infection was higher in the Seychelles and Mauritius than in Thailand and India. Even though substantial underdiagnosis is suspected, this assessment of CHIKV importation to Germany offers valuable information about the details of travel-associated cases. Between 17 and 53 notified cases per year signify that CHIKV would be occasionally available for local transmission in Germany once a vector becomes present. Although CHIKV most often causes a comparatively mild disease, the high median age of notified cases and the higher age than dengue patients support more severe disease courses in older adults. Travelers to all CHIKV endemic areas should protect against mosquito bites. In Germany, CHIKV surveillance will be continued to monitor ongoing importation of the virus and to detect early potential autochthonous cases.
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Prevalence of antibodies to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in German adult population in pre- and post-pandemic period.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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In order to detect levels of pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies in different age groups and to measure age-specific infection rates of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic in Germany, we conducted a seroprevalence study based on samples from an ongoing nationwide representative health survey.
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Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.
Heribert Schunkert, Inke R König, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Themistocles L Assimes, Hilma Holm, Michael Preuss, Alexandre F R Stewart, Maja Barbalic, Christian Gieger, Devin Absher, Zouhair Aherrahrou, Hooman Allayee, David Altshuler, Sonia S Anand, Karl Andersen, Jeffrey L Anderson, Diego Ardissino, Stephen G Ball, Anthony J Balmforth, Timothy A Barnes, Diane M Becker, Lewis C Becker, Klaus Berger, Joshua C Bis, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Eric Boerwinkle, Peter S Braund, Morris J Brown, Mary Susan Burnett, Ian Buysschaert, , John F Carlquist, Li Chen, Sven Cichon, Veryan Codd, Robert W Davies, George Dedoussis, Abbas Dehghan, Serkalem Demissie, Joseph M Devaney, Patrick Diemert, Ron Do, Angela Doering, Sandra Eifert, Nour Eddine El Mokhtari, Stephen G Ellis, Roberto Elosua, James C Engert, Stephen E Epstein, Ulf de Faire, Marcus Fischer, Aaron R Folsom, Jennifer Freyer, Bruna Gigante, Domenico Girelli, Solveig Gretarsdottir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jeffrey R Gulcher, Eran Halperin, Naomi Hammond, Stanley L Hazen, Albert Hofman, Benjamin D Horne, Thomas Illig, Carlos Iribarren, Gregory T Jones, J Wouter Jukema, Michael A Kaiser, Lee M Kaplan, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Joshua W Knowles, Genovefa Kolovou, Augustine Kong, Reijo Laaksonen, Diether Lambrechts, Karin Leander, Guillaume Lettre, Mingyao Li, Wolfgang Lieb, Christina Loley, Andrew J Lotery, Pier M Mannucci, Seraya Maouche, Nicola Martinelli, Pascal P McKeown, Christa Meisinger, Thomas Meitinger, Olle Melander, Pier Angelica Merlini, Vincent Mooser, Thomas Morgan, Thomas W Mühleisen, Joseph B Muhlestein, Thomas Münzel, Kiran Musunuru, Janja Nahrstaedt, Christopher P Nelson, Markus M Nöthen, Oliviero Olivieri, Riyaz S Patel, Chris C Patterson, Annette Peters, Flora Peyvandi, Liming Qu, Arshed A Quyyumi, Daniel J Rader, Loukianos S Rallidis, Catherine Rice, Frits R Rosendaal, Diana Rubin, Veikko Salomaa, M Lourdes Sampietro, Manj S Sandhu, Eric Schadt, Arne Schäfer, Arne Schillert, Stefan Schreiber, Jürgen Schrezenmeir, Stephen M Schwartz, David S Siscovick, Mohan Sivananthan, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Albert Smith, Tamara B Smith, Jaapjan D Snoep, Nicole Soranzo, John A Spertus, Klaus Stark, Kathy Stirrups, Monika Stoll, W H Wilson Tang, Stephanie Tennstedt, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Maciej Tomaszewski, André G Uitterlinden, Andre M van Rij, Benjamin F Voight, Nick J Wareham, George A Wells, H-Erich Wichmann, Philipp S Wild, Christina Willenborg, Jaqueline C M Witteman, Benjamin J Wright, Shu Ye, Tanja Zeller, Andreas Ziegler, Francois Cambien, Alison H Goodall, L Adrienne Cupples, Thomas Quertermous, Winfried März, Christian Hengstenberg, Stefan Blankenberg, Willem H Ouwehand, Alistair S Hall, Panos Deloukas, John R Thompson, Kari Stefansson, Robert Roberts, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Christopher J O'Donnell, Ruth McPherson, Jeanette Erdmann, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10?? and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits.
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Heritability of early repolarization: a population-based study.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2011
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Early repolarization (ER), defined by J-point elevation in 12-lead ECG, was recently associated with increased risk for idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and cardiovascular mortality. The determinants of ER are unknown. We investigated its heritability in a large, family-based cohort.
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Large-scale candidate gene analysis of HDL particle features.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established marker of cardiovascular risk with significant genetic determination. However, HDL particles are not homogenous, and refined HDL phenotyping may improve insight into regulation of HDL metabolism. We therefore assessed HDL particles by NMR spectroscopy and conducted a large-scale candidate gene association analysis.
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Large listeriosis outbreak linked to cheese made from pasteurized milk, Germany, 2006-2007.
Foodborne Pathog. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2010
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A commercial cheese (acid curd) made from pasteurized milk caused a large listeriosis outbreak in Germany from October 2006 through February 2007. The Listeria monocytogenes outbreak strain was identified in humans and in cheese samples from a patients home and from the production plant. During the outbreak period, 189 patients were affected, which was 97% above the mean case number for the respective time period of the years 2002 to 2005. Of patients with available detailed information on cheese consumption (n=47), 70% reported to have consumed the incriminated cheese product. Recent European food safety alerts due to Listeria-contaminated cheeses more often concerned products made from pasteurized or heat-treated milk than from raw milk. The findings should be considered in prevention guidelines addressing vulnerable populations.
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FGF21 signalling pathway and metabolic traits - genetic association analysis.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
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Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel master regulator of metabolic profile. The biological actions of FGF21 are elicited upon its klotho beta (KLB)-facilitated binding to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1), FGFR2 and FGFR3. We hypothesised that common polymorphisms in the FGF21 signalling pathway may be associated with metabolic risk. At the screening stage, we examined associations between 63 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes of this pathway (FGF21, KLB, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3) and four metabolic phenotypes (LDL cholesterol - LDL-C, HDL-cholesterol - HDL-C, triglycerides and body mass index) in 629 individuals from Silesian Hypertension Study (SHS). Replication analyses were performed in 5478 unrelated individuals of the Swiss CoLaus cohort (imputed genotypes) and in 3030 directly genotyped individuals of the German Myocardial Infarction Family Study (GerMIFS). Of 54 SNPs that met quality control criteria after genotyping in SHS, 4 (rs4733946 and rs7012413 in FGFR1; rs2071616 in FGFR2 and rs7670903 in KLB) showed suggestive association with LDL-C (P=0.0006, P=0.0013, P=0.0055, P=0.011, respectively) and 1 (rs2608819 in KLB) was associated with body mass index (P=0.011); all with false discovery rate q<0.5. Of these, only one FGFR2 polymorphism (rs2071616) showed replicated association with LDL-C in both CoLaus (P=0.009) and men from GerMIFS (P=0.017). The direction of allelic effect of rs2071616 upon LDL-C was consistent in all examined populations. These data show that common genetic variations in FGFR2 may be associated with LDL-C in subjects of white European ancestry.
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Genetic association study identifies HSPB7 as a risk gene for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2010
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Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a structural heart disease with strong genetic background. Monogenic forms of DCM are observed in families with mutations located mostly in genes encoding structural and sarcomeric proteins. However, strong evidence suggests that genetic factors also affect the susceptibility to idiopathic DCM. To identify risk alleles for non-familial forms of DCM, we carried out a case-control association study, genotyping 664 DCM cases and 1,874 population-based healthy controls from Germany using a 50K human cardiovascular disease bead chip covering more than 2,000 genes pre-selected for cardiovascular relevance. After quality control, 30,920 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were tested for association with the disease by logistic regression adjusted for gender, and results were genomic-control corrected. The analysis revealed a significant association between a SNP in HSPB7 gene (rs1739843, minor allele frequency 39%) and idiopathic DCM (p = 1.06 × 10??, OR? = 0.67 [95% CI 0.57-0.79] for the minor allele T). Three more SNPs showed p < 2.21 × 10??. De novo genotyping of these four SNPs was done in three independent case-control studies of idiopathic DCM. Association between SNP rs1739843 and DCM was significant in all replication samples: Germany (n =564, n = 981 controls, p = 2.07 × 10?³, OR?= 0.79 [95% CI 0.67-0.92]), France 1 (n = 433 cases, n = 395 controls, p =3.73 × 10?³, OR? = 0.74 [95% CI 0.60-0.91]), and France 2 (n = 249 cases, n = 380 controls, p = 2.26 × 10??, OR? = 0.63 [95% CI 0.50-0.81]). The combined analysis of all four studies including a total of n = 1,910 cases and n = 3,630 controls showed highly significant evidence for association between rs1739843 and idiopathic DCM (p = 5.28 × 10?¹³, OR= 0.72 [95% CI 0.65-0.78]). None of the other three SNPs showed significant results in the replication stage.This finding of the HSPB7 gene from a genetic search for idiopathic DCM using a large SNP panel underscores the influence of common polymorphisms on DCM susceptibility.
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Lack of association between the Trp719Arg polymorphism in kinesin-like protein-6 and coronary artery disease in 19 case-control studies.
Themistocles L Assimes, Hilma Holm, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Benjamin F Voight, Jeanette Erdmann, Christina Willenborg, Dhananjay Vaidya, Changchun Xie, Chris C Patterson, Thomas M Morgan, Mary Susan Burnett, Mingyao Li, Mark A Hlatky, Joshua W Knowles, John R Thompson, Devin Absher, Carlos Iribarren, Alan Go, Stephen P Fortmann, Stephen Sidney, Neil Risch, Hua Tang, Richard M Myers, Klaus Berger, Monika Stoll, Svati H Shah, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Karl Andersen, Aki S Havulinna, J Enrique Herrera, Nauder Faraday, Yoonhee Kim, Brian G Kral, Rasika A Mathias, Ingo Ruczinski, Bhoom Suktitipat, Alexander F Wilson, Lisa R Yanek, Lewis C Becker, Patrick Linsel-Nitschke, Wolfgang Lieb, Inke R König, Christian Hengstenberg, Marcus Fischer, Klaus Stark, Wibke Reinhard, Janina Winogradow, Martina Grassl, Anika Grosshennig, Michael Preuss, Stefan Schreiber, H-Erich Wichmann, Christa Meisinger, Jean Yee, Yechiel Friedlander, Ron Do, James B Meigs, Gordon Williams, David M Nathan, Calum A MacRae, Liming Qu, Robert L Wilensky, William H Matthai, Atif N Qasim, Hakon Hakonarson, Augusto D Pichard, Kenneth M Kent, Lowell Satler, Joseph M Lindsay, Ron Waksman, Christopher W Knouff, Dawn M Waterworth, Max C Walker, Vincent E Mooser, Jaume Marrugat, Gavin Lucas, Isaac Subirana, Joan Sala, Rafael Ramos, Nicola Martinelli, Oliviero Olivieri, Elisabetta Trabetti, Giovanni Malerba, Pier Franco Pignatti, Candace Guiducci, Daniel Mirel, Melissa Parkin, Joel N Hirschhorn, Rosanna Asselta, Stefano Duga, Kiran Musunuru, Mark J Daly, Shaun Purcell, Sandra Eifert, Peter S Braund, Benjamin J Wright, Anthony J Balmforth, Stephen G Ball, , Willem H Ouwehand, Panos Deloukas, Michael Scholz, Francois Cambien, Andreas Huge, Thomas Scheffold, Veikko Salomaa, Domenico Girelli, Christopher B Granger, Leena Peltonen, Pascal P McKeown, David Altshuler, Olle Melander, Joseph M Devaney, Stephen E Epstein, Daniel J Rader, Roberto Elosua, James C Engert, Sonia S Anand, Alistair S Hall, Andreas Ziegler, Christopher J O'Donnell, John A Spertus, David Siscovick, Stephen M Schwartz, Diane Becker, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Kari Stefansson, Heribert Schunkert, Nilesh J Samani, Thomas Quertermous.
J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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We sought to replicate the association between the kinesin-like protein 6 (KIF6) Trp719Arg polymorphism (rs20455), and clinical coronary artery disease (CAD).
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Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution.
Iris M Heid, Anne U Jackson, Joshua C Randall, Thomas W Winkler, Lu Qi, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Gudmar Thorleifsson, M Carola Zillikens, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Reedik Mägi, Tsegaselassie Workalemahu, Charles C White, Nabila Bouatia-Naji, Tamara B Harris, Sonja I Berndt, Erik Ingelsson, Cristen J Willer, Michael N Weedon, Jian'an Luan, Sailaja Vedantam, Tonu Esko, Tuomas O Kilpeläinen, Zoltan Kutalik, Shengxu Li, Keri L Monda, Anna L Dixon, Christopher C Holmes, Lee M Kaplan, Liming Liang, Josine L Min, Miriam F Moffatt, Cliona Molony, George Nicholson, Eric E Schadt, Krina T Zondervan, Mary F Feitosa, Teresa Ferreira, Hana Lango Allen, Robert J Weyant, Eleanor Wheeler, Andrew R Wood, , Karol Estrada, Michael E Goddard, Guillaume Lettre, Massimo Mangino, Dale R Nyholt, Shaun Purcell, Albert Vernon Smith, Peter M Visscher, Jian Yang, Steven A McCarroll, James Nemesh, Benjamin F Voight, Devin Absher, Najaf Amin, Thor Aspelund, Lachlan Coin, Nicole L Glazer, Caroline Hayward, Nancy L Heard-Costa, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Marika Kaakinen, Karen Kapur, Shamika Ketkar, Joshua W Knowles, Peter Kraft, Aldi T Kraja, Claudia Lamina, Michael F Leitzmann, Barbara McKnight, Andrew P Morris, Ken K Ong, John R B Perry, Marjolein J Peters, Ozren Polašek, Inga Prokopenko, Nigel W Rayner, Samuli Ripatti, Fernando Rivadeneira, Neil R Robertson, Serena Sanna, Ulla Sovio, Ida Surakka, Alexander Teumer, Sophie van Wingerden, Veronique Vitart, Jing Hua Zhao, Christine Cavalcanti-Proença, Peter S Chines, Eva Fisher, Jennifer R Kulzer, Cécile Lecoeur, Narisu Narisu, Camilla Sandholt, Laura J Scott, Kaisa Silander, Klaus Stark, Mari-Liis Tammesoo, Tanya M Teslovich, Nicholas John Timpson, Richard M Watanabe, Ryan Welch, Daniel I Chasman, Matthew N Cooper, John-Olov Jansson, Johannes Kettunen, Robert W Lawrence, Niina Pellikka, Markus Perola, Liesbeth Vandenput, Helene Alavere, Peter Almgren, Larry D Atwood, Amanda J Bennett, Reiner Biffar, Lori L Bonnycastle, Stefan R Bornstein, Thomas A Buchanan, Harry Campbell, Ian N M Day, Mariano Dei, Marcus Dörr, Paul Elliott, Michael R Erdos, Johan G Eriksson, Nelson B Freimer, Mao Fu, Stefan Gaget, Eco J C Geus, Anette P Gjesing, Harald Grallert, Jürgen Gräßler, Christopher J Groves, Candace Guiducci, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Neelam Hassanali, Aki S Havulinna, Karl-Heinz Herzig, Andrew A Hicks, Jennie Hui, Wilmar Igl, Pekka Jousilahti, Antti Jula, Eero Kajantie, Leena Kinnunen, Ivana Kolčić, Seppo Koskinen, Peter Kovacs, Heyo K Kroemer, Vjekoslav Krželj, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsti Kvaloy, Jaana Laitinen, Olivier Lantieri, G Mark Lathrop, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Robert N Luben, Barbara Ludwig, Wendy L McArdle, Anne McCarthy, Mario A Morken, Mari Nelis, Matt J Neville, Guillaume Paré, Alex N Parker, John F Peden, Irene Pichler, Kirsi H Pietiläinen, Carl G P Platou, Anneli Pouta, Martin Ridderstråle, Nilesh J Samani, Jouko Saramies, Juha Sinisalo, Jan H Smit, Rona J Strawbridge, Heather M Stringham, Amy J Swift, Maris Teder-Laving, Brian Thomson, Gianluca Usala, Joyce B J van Meurs, Gert-Jan van Ommen, Vincent Vatin, Claudia B Volpato, Henri Wallaschofski, G Bragi Walters, Elisabeth Widén, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Daniel R Witte, Lina Zgaga, Paavo Zitting, John P Beilby, Alan L James, Mika Kähönen, Terho Lehtimäki, Markku S Nieminen, Claes Ohlsson, Lyle J Palmer, Olli Raitakari, Paul M Ridker, Michael Stumvoll, Anke Tönjes, Jorma Viikari, Beverley Balkau, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Richard N Bergman, Heiner Boeing, George Davey Smith, Shah Ebrahim, Philippe Froguel, Torben Hansen, Christian Hengstenberg, Kristian Hveem, Bo Isomaa, Torben Jørgensen, Fredrik Karpe, Kay-Tee Khaw, Markku Laakso, Debbie A Lawlor, Michel Marre, Thomas Meitinger, Andres Metspalu, Kristian Midthjell, Oluf Pedersen, Veikko Salomaa, Peter E H Schwarz, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Timo T Valle, Nicholas J Wareham, Alice M Arnold, Jacques S Beckmann, Sven Bergmann, Eric Boerwinkle, Dorret I Boomsma, Mark J Caulfield, Francis S Collins, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Andrew T Hattersley, Albert Hofman, Frank B Hu, Thomas Illig, Carlos Iribarren, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, W H Linda Kao, Jaakko Kaprio, Lenore J Launer, Patricia B Munroe, Ben Oostra, Brenda W Penninx, Peter P Pramstaller, Bruce M Psaty, Thomas Quertermous, Aila Rissanen, Igor Rudan, Alan R Shuldiner, Nicole Soranzo, Timothy D Spector, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Manuela Uda, André Uitterlinden, Henry Völzke, Peter Vollenweider, James F Wilson, Jacqueline C Witteman, Alan F Wright, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Michael Boehnke, Ingrid B Borecki, Panos Deloukas, Timothy M Frayling, Leif C Groop, Talin Haritunians, David J Hunter, Robert C Kaplan, Kari E North, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Leena Peltonen, David Schlessinger, David P Strachan, Joel N Hirschhorn, Themistocles L Assimes, H-Erich Wichmann, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Cornelia M van Duijn, Kari Stefansson, L Adrienne Cupples, Ruth J F Loos, Inês Barroso, Mark I McCarthy, Caroline S Fox, Karen L Mohlke, Cecilia M Lindgren.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2010
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Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10?? to P = 1.8 × 10???) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10?³ to P = 1.2 × 10?¹³). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.
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Genetics in neuroendocrine immunology: implications for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as osteoarthritis (OA). For RA, most of the known genetic markers are linked with genes from immunological pathways. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on RA identified known and novel susceptibility genes like HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, STAT4, TRAF1/C5, OLIG3/TNFAIP3, CD40, CCL21, MMEL1-TNFRSF14, CDK6, PRKCQ, IL2RB, and KIF5A-PIP4K2C. These association signals explain more than 50% of the genetic influence on RA. In contrast, less GWAS data for OA exist. Most OA susceptibility genes arose from classical candidate gene analyses and were not replicated in all study samples. Neuroendocrine factors are hypothesized to play an important role both in RA and OA etiology. Here, we discuss these findings and present an outlook for genetic association studies after GWAS.
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Outbreak of leptospirosis among triathlon participants in Germany, 2006.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2010
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In August 2006, a case of leptospirosis occurred in an athlete after a triathlon held around Heidelberg and in the Neckar river. In order to study a possible outbreak and to determine risk factors for infection an epidemiological investigation was performed.
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Slit3 inhibits Robo3-induced invasion of synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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The repellent factor family of Slit molecules has been described to have repulsive function in the developing nervous system on growing axons expressing the Robo receptors. However, until today no data are available on whether these repellent factors are involved in the regulation of synovial fibroblast (SF) activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
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Food-borne norovirus-outbreak at a military base, Germany, 2009.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2010
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Norovirus is often transmitted from person-to-person. Transmission may also be food-borne, but only few norovirus outbreak investigations have identified food items as likely vehicles of norovirus transmission through an analytical epidemiological study.During 7-9 January, 2009, 36 persons at a military base in Germany fell ill with acute gastroenteritis. Food from the military bases canteen was suspected as vehicle of infection, norovirus as the pathogen causing the illnesses. An investigation was initiated to describe the outbreaks extent, to verify the pathogen, and to identify modes of transmission and source of infection to prevent further cases.
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Characteristics and risk factors for symptomatic Giardia lamblia infections in Germany.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2010
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In developed countries, giardiasis is considered a travel related disease. However, routine surveillance data from Germany indicate that >50% of infections were acquired indigenously. We studied the epidemiological characteristics of symptomatic Giardia infections acquired in Germany and abroad, and verified the proportion of cases acquired in Germany in order to investigate risk factors for sporadic autochthonous Giardia infections.
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Association of early repolarization pattern on ECG with risk of cardiac and all-cause mortality: a population-based prospective cohort study (MONICA/KORA).
PLoS Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2010
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Early repolarization pattern (ERP) on electrocardiogram was associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac arrest in a case-control study and with cardiovascular mortality in a Finnish community-based sample. We sought to determine ERP prevalence and its association with cardiac and all-cause mortality in a large, prospective, population-based case-cohort study (Monitoring of Cardiovascular Diseases and Conditions [MONICA]/KORA [Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg]) comprised of individuals of Central-European descent.
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Epidemiology of reported Yersinia enterocolitica infections in Germany, 2001-2008.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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Yersiniosis is the third most common zoonotic bacterial disease in Germany and the European Union. Sequelae of Yersinia enterocolitica infections, such as reactive arthritis, have been reported. Consumption of pork and its products, especially eaten raw or undercooked, is an important risk factor of yersiniosis. Infection with Y. enterocolitica is notifiable through the national surveillance system for infectious diseases in Germany and several thousands of cases are being reported each year. We present recent data on the epidemiology of reported yersiniosis in Germany.
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Epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infections, Germany, 2007-2008.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2009
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Approximately 60% of hepatitis A virus infections in Germany occur in persons without a travel history to disease-endemic areas and for whom sources of infection are unknown. Recommendation of pretravel vaccination fails to prevent the remaining imported infections. Using enhanced surveillance in 2007-2008, we analyzed epidemiologic patterns of hepatitis A in Germany and appropriateness and adequacy of current immunization recommendations. Young patients with a migration background who had visited friends and family in their ancestral countries accounted for most imported cases. Phylogenetic analysis showed high diversity of sequence data and clustering of strains with similar regions of origin or patient migration backgrounds. Virologic findings are compatible with those of low-incidence countries, where virtually all infections are directly or indirectly imported from other regions. Germans with a migration background are seen as a special risk group so far insufficiently reached by pretravel vaccination advice.
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Common polymorphisms influencing serum uric acid levels contribute to susceptibility to gout, but not to coronary artery disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2009
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Recently, a large meta-analysis including over 28,000 participants identified nine different loci with association to serum uric acid (UA) levels. Since elevated serum UA levels potentially cause gout and are a possible risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), we performed two large case-control association analyses with participants from the German MI Family Study. In the first study, we assessed the association of the qualitative trait gout and ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers that showed association to UA serum levels. In the second study, the same genetic polymorphisms were analyzed for association with CAD.
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A genome-wide association study reveals variants in ARL15 that influence adiponectin levels.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2009
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The adipocyte-derived protein adiponectin is highly heritable and inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We meta-analyzed 3 genome-wide association studies for circulating adiponectin levels (n = 8,531) and sought validation of the lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 additional cohorts (n = 6,202). Five SNPs were genome-wide significant in their relationship with adiponectin (P< or =5x10(-8)). We then tested whether these 5 SNPs were associated with risk of T2D and CHD using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P< or =0.011 to declare statistical significance for these disease associations. SNPs at the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus demonstrated the strongest associations with adiponectin levels (P-combined = 9.2x10(-19) for lead SNP, rs266717, n = 14,733). A novel variant in the ARL15 (ADP-ribosylation factor-like 15) gene was associated with lower circulating levels of adiponectin (rs4311394-G, P-combined = 2.9x10(-8), n = 14,733). This same risk allele at ARL15 was also associated with a higher risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = 8.5x10(-6), n = 22,421) more nominally, an increased risk of T2D (OR = 1.11, P = 3.2x10(-3), n = 10,128), and several metabolic traits. Expression studies in humans indicated that ARL15 is well-expressed in skeletal muscle. These findings identify a novel protein, ARL15, which influences circulating adiponectin levels and may impact upon CHD risk.
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Genetic variation at chromosome 1p13.3 affects sortilin mRNA expression, cellular LDL-uptake and serum LDL levels which translates to the risk of coronary artery disease.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2009
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A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs599839 located at chromosome 1p13.3 has previously been associated with risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and with serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). A functional link explaining the association of SNP rs599839 with LDL-C levels and CAD risk has not yet been elucidated.
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A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 22 loci associated with eight hematological parameters in the HaemGen consortium.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
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The number and volume of cells in the blood affect a wide range of disorders including cancer and cardiovascular, metabolic, infectious and immune conditions. We consider here the genetic variation in eight clinically relevant hematological parameters, including hemoglobin levels, red and white blood cell counts and platelet counts and volume. We describe common variants within 22 genetic loci reproducibly associated with these hematological parameters in 13,943 samples from six European population-based studies, including 6 associated with red blood cell parameters, 15 associated with platelet parameters and 1 associated with total white blood cell count. We further identified a long-range haplotype at 12q24 associated with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in 9,479 cases and 10,527 controls. We show that this haplotype demonstrates extensive disease pleiotropy, as it contains known risk loci for type 1 diabetes, hypertension and celiac disease and has been spread by a selective sweep specific to European and geographically nearby populations.
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New susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease on chromosome 3q22.3.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2009
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We present a three-stage analysis of genome-wide SNP data in 1,222 German individuals with myocardial infarction and 1,298 controls, in silico replication in three additional genome-wide datasets of coronary artery disease (CAD) and subsequent replication in approximately 25,000 subjects. We identified one new CAD risk locus on 3q22.3 in MRAS (P = 7.44 x 10(-13); OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.11-1.19), and suggestive association with a locus on 12q24.31 near HNF1A-C12orf43 (P = 4.81 x 10(-7); OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.05-1.11).
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Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the SLC22A3-LPAL2-LPA gene cluster as a risk locus for coronary artery disease.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2009
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We identify the SLC22A3-LPAL2-LPA gene cluster as a strong susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease (CAD) through a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study. This locus was not identified from previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies focused on univariate analyses of SNPs. The proposed approach may have wide utility for analyzing GWA data for other complex traits.
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Lack of association between a common polymorphism near the INSIG2 gene and BMI, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular risk factors.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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Epidemiological studies revealed an increasing prevalence of and a steep increase in obesity, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Because significant influence of a polymorphism, rs7566605, near the INSIG2 gene on BMI has been shown in the general population and in obesity cohorts, we hypothesized that this polymorphism might also act through an elevated BMI on the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial infarction (MI). We pursued two strategies: First, the polymorphism rs7566605 was investigated for association with BMI, CAD/MI, and cardiovascular risk factors in a large German cohort at high risk for CAD and MI (n = 1,460 MI patients) as compared to unrelated healthy controls (n = 1,215); second, we extended our analyses on the families of MI patients and performed family-based association testing (n = 5,390 individuals). The polymorphism rs7566605 was analyzed using TaqMan technology. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium could be observed, and the call rate was 98.2%. No significant associations of rs7566605 with CAD/MI, BMI, and classical cardiovascular risk factors could be detected in the full sample size or in the subgroups. A total of 6,878 individuals were investigated in a population of German MI patients and their family members. Although the number of individuals was large enough, no influence of the rs7566605 INSIG2 polymorphism was detected on BMI and CAD/MI. We therefore conclude that in our sample the SNP rs7566605 near the INSIG2 gene does not influence BMI and is not associated directly with CAD/MI or indirectly through cardiovascular risk factors.
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Association of common polymorphisms in known susceptibility genes with rheumatoid arthritis in a Slovak population using osteoarthritis patients as controls.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
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Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common and complex autoimmune disease. As well as the major susceptibility gene HLA-DRB1, recent genome-wide and candidate-gene studies reported additional evidence for association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the PTPN22, STAT4, OLIG3/TNFAIP3 and TRAF1/C5 loci with RA. This study was initiated to investigate the association between defined genetic markers and RA in a Slovak population. In contrast to recent studies, we included intensively-characterized osteoarthritis (OA) patients as controls.
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Genome-wide association of early-onset myocardial infarction with single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants.
, Sekar Kathiresan, Benjamin F Voight, Shaun Purcell, Kiran Musunuru, Diego Ardissino, Pier M Mannucci, Sonia Anand, James C Engert, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, Jeanette Erdmann, Muredach P Reilly, Daniel J Rader, Thomas Morgan, John A Spertus, Monika Stoll, Domenico Girelli, Pascal P McKeown, Chris C Patterson, David S Siscovick, Christopher J O'Donnell, Roberto Elosua, Leena Peltonen, Veikko Salomaa, Stephen M Schwartz, Olle Melander, David Altshuler, Pier Angelica Merlini, Carlo Berzuini, Luisa Bernardinelli, Flora Peyvandi, Marco Tubaro, Patrizia Celli, Maurizio Ferrario, Raffaela Fetiveau, Nicola Marziliano, Giorgio Casari, Michele Galli, Flavio Ribichini, Marco Rossi, Francesco Bernardi, Pietro Zonzin, Alberto Piazza, Jean Yee, Yechiel Friedlander, Jaume Marrugat, Gavin Lucas, Isaac Subirana, Joan Sala, Rafael Ramos, James B Meigs, Gordon Williams, David M Nathan, Calum A MacRae, Aki S Havulinna, Göran Berglund, Joel N Hirschhorn, Rosanna Asselta, Stefano Duga, Marta Spreafico, Mark J Daly, James Nemesh, Joshua M Korn, Steven A McCarroll, Aarti Surti, Candace Guiducci, Lauren Gianniny, Daniel Mirel, Melissa Parkin, Noel Burtt, Stacey B Gabriel, John R Thompson, Peter S Braund, Benjamin J Wright, Anthony J Balmforth, Stephen G Ball, Alistair S Hall, Patrick Linsel-Nitschke, Wolfgang Lieb, Andreas Ziegler, Inke König, Christian Hengstenberg, Marcus Fischer, Klaus Stark, Anika Grosshennig, Michael Preuss, H-Erich Wichmann, Stefan Schreiber, Willem Ouwehand, Panos Deloukas, Michael Scholz, Francois Cambien, Mingyao Li, Zhen Chen, Robert Wilensky, William Matthai, Atif Qasim, Hakon H Hakonarson, Joe Devaney, Mary-Susan Burnett, Augusto D Pichard, Kenneth M Kent, Lowell Satler, Joseph M Lindsay, Ron Waksman, Christopher W Knouff, Dawn M Waterworth, Max C Walker, Vincent Mooser, Stephen E Epstein, Thomas Scheffold, Klaus Berger, Andreas Huge, Nicola Martinelli, Oliviero Olivieri, Roberto Corrocher, Pascal McKeown, Erdmann Erdmann, Inke R König, Hilma Holm, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Kari Stefansson, Ron Do, Changchun Xie, David Siscovick.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
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We conducted a genome-wide association study testing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNVs) for association with early-onset myocardial infarction in 2,967 cases and 3,075 controls. We carried out replication in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 19,492. SNPs at nine loci reached genome-wide significance: three are newly identified (21q22 near MRPS6-SLC5A3-KCNE2, 6p24 in PHACTR1 and 2q33 in WDR12) and six replicated prior observations (9p21, 1p13 near CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1, 10q11 near CXCL12, 1q41 in MIA3, 19p13 near LDLR and 1p32 near PCSK9). We tested 554 common copy number polymorphisms (>1% allele frequency) and none met the pre-specified threshold for replication (P < 10(-3)). We identified 8,065 rare CNVs but did not detect a greater CNV burden in cases compared to controls, in genes compared to the genome as a whole, or at any individual locus. SNPs at nine loci were reproducibly associated with myocardial infarction, but tests of common and rare CNVs failed to identify additional associations with myocardial infarction risk.
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Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease.
, Panos Deloukas, Stavroula Kanoni, Christina Willenborg, Martin Farrall, Themistocles L Assimes, John R Thompson, Erik Ingelsson, Danish Saleheen, Jeanette Erdmann, Benjamin A Goldstein, Kathleen Stirrups, Inke R König, Jean-Baptiste Cazier, Asa Johansson, Alistair S Hall, Jong-Young Lee, Cristen J Willer, John C Chambers, Tonu Esko, Lasse Folkersen, Anuj Goel, Elin Grundberg, Aki S Havulinna, Weang K Ho, Jemma C Hopewell, Niclas Eriksson, Marcus E Kleber, Kati Kristiansson, Per Lundmark, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Suzanne Rafelt, Dmitry Shungin, Rona J Strawbridge, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Emmi Tikkanen, Natalie Van Zuydam, Benjamin F Voight, Lindsay L Waite, Weihua Zhang, Andreas Ziegler, Devin Absher, David Altshuler, Anthony J Balmforth, Inês Barroso, Peter S Braund, Christof Burgdorf, Simone Claudi-Boehm, David Cox, Maria Dimitriou, Ron Do, Alex S F Doney, NourEddine El Mokhtari, Per Eriksson, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Anders Franco-Cereceda, Bruna Gigante, Leif Groop, Stefan Gustafsson, Jörg Hager, Göran Hallmans, Bok-Ghee Han, Sarah E Hunt, Hyun M Kang, Thomas Illig, Thorsten Kessler, Joshua W Knowles, Genovefa Kolovou, Johanna Kuusisto, Claudia Langenberg, Cordelia Langford, Karin Leander, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Anders Lundmark, Mark I McCarthy, Christa Meisinger, Olle Melander, Evelin Mihailov, Seraya Maouche, Andrew D Morris, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Kjell Nikus, John F Peden, N William Rayner, Asif Rasheed, Silke Rosinger, Diana Rubin, Moritz P Rumpf, Arne Schäfer, Mohan Sivananthan, Ci Song, Alexandre F R Stewart, Sian-Tsung Tan, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, C Ellen van der Schoot, Peter J Wagner, George A Wells, Philipp S Wild, Tsun-Po Yang, Philippe Amouyel, Dominique Arveiler, Hanneke Basart, Michael Boehnke, Eric Boerwinkle, Paolo Brambilla, Francois Cambien, Adrienne L Cupples, Ulf de Faire, Abbas Dehghan, Patrick Diemert, Stephen E Epstein, Alun Evans, Marco M Ferrario, Jean Ferrières, Dominique Gauguier, Alan S Go, Alison H Goodall, Villi Gudnason, Stanley L Hazen, Hilma Holm, Carlos Iribarren, Yangsoo Jang, Mika Kähönen, Frank Kee, Hyo-Soo Kim, Norman Klopp, Wolfgang Koenig, Wolfgang Kratzer, Kari Kuulasmaa, Markku Laakso, Reijo Laaksonen, Ji-Young Lee, Lars Lind, Willem H Ouwehand, Sarah Parish, Jeong E Park, Nancy L Pedersen, Annette Peters, Thomas Quertermous, Daniel J Rader, Veikko Salomaa, Eric Schadt, Svati H Shah, Juha Sinisalo, Klaus Stark, Kari Stefansson, David-Alexandre Trégouët, Jarmo Virtamo, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas Wareham, Martina E Zimmermann, Markku S Nieminen, Christian Hengstenberg, Manjinder S Sandhu, Tomi Pastinen, Ann-Christine Syvänen, G Kees Hovingh, George Dedoussis, Paul W Franks, Terho Lehtimäki, Andres Metspalu, Pierre A Zalloua, Agneta Siegbahn, Stefan Schreiber, Samuli Ripatti, Stefan S Blankenberg, Markus Perola, Robert Clarke, Bernhard O Boehm, Christopher O'Donnell, Muredach P Reilly, Winfried März, Rory Collins, Sekar Kathiresan, Anders Hamsten, Jaspal S Kooner, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, John Danesh, Colin N A Palmer, Robert Roberts, Hugh Watkins, Heribert Schunkert, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2) < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways.
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Hepatitis E virus seroprevalence among adults, Germany.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
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We assessed hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibody seroprevalence in a sample of the adult population in Germany. Overall HEV IgG prevalence was 16.8% (95% CI 15.6%-17.9%) and increased with age, leveling off at >60 years of age. HEV is endemic in Germany, and the lifetime risk for exposure is high.
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FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index.
Jian Yang, Ruth J F Loos, Joseph E Powell, Sarah E Medland, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Daniel I Chasman, Lynda M Rose, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Reedik Mägi, Lindsay Waite, Albert Vernon Smith, Laura M Yerges-Armstrong, Keri L Monda, David Hadley, Anubha Mahajan, Guo Li, Karen Kapur, Veronique Vitart, Jennifer E Huffman, Sophie R Wang, Cameron Palmer, Tonu Esko, Krista Fischer, Jing Hua Zhao, Ayse Demirkan, Aaron Isaacs, Mary F Feitosa, Jian'an Luan, Nancy L Heard-Costa, Charles White, Anne U Jackson, Michael Preuss, Andreas Ziegler, Joel Eriksson, Zoltan Kutalik, Francesca Frau, Ilja M Nolte, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Kevin B Jacobs, Niek Verweij, Anuj Goel, Carolina Medina-Gomez, Karol Estrada, Jennifer Lynn Bragg-Gresham, Serena Sanna, Carlo Sidore, Jonathan Tyrer, Alexander Teumer, Inga Prokopenko, Massimo Mangino, Cecilia M Lindgren, Themistocles L Assimes, Alan R Shuldiner, Jennie Hui, John P Beilby, Wendy L McArdle, Per Hall, Talin Haritunians, Lina Zgaga, Ivana Kolčić, Ozren Polašek, Tatijana Zemunik, Ben A Oostra, M Juhani Junttila, Henrik Grönberg, Stefan Schreiber, Annette Peters, Andrew A Hicks, Jonathan Stephens, Nicola S Foad, Jaana Laitinen, Anneli Pouta, Marika Kaakinen, Gonneke Willemsen, Jacqueline M Vink, Sarah H Wild, Gerjan Navis, Folkert W Asselbergs, Georg Homuth, Ulrich John, Carlos Iribarren, Tamara Harris, Lenore Launer, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Eric Boerwinkle, Gemma Cadby, Lyle J Palmer, Alan L James, Arthur W Musk, Erik Ingelsson, Bruce M Psaty, Jacques S Beckmann, Gérard Waeber, Peter Vollenweider, Caroline Hayward, Alan F Wright, Igor Rudan, Leif C Groop, Andres Metspalu, Kay Tee Khaw, Cornelia M van Duijn, Ingrid B Borecki, Michael A Province, Nicholas J Wareham, Jean-Claude Tardif, Heikki V Huikuri, L Adrienne Cupples, Larry D Atwood, Caroline S Fox, Michael Boehnke, Francis S Collins, Karen L Mohlke, Jeanette Erdmann, Heribert Schunkert, Christian Hengstenberg, Klaus Stark, Mattias Lorentzon, Claes Ohlsson, Daniele Cusi, Jan A Staessen, Melanie M van der Klauw, Peter P Pramstaller, Sekar Kathiresan, Jennifer D Jolley, Samuli Ripatti, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Eco J C de Geus, Dorret I Boomsma, Brenda Penninx, James F Wilson, Harry Campbell, Stephen J Chanock, Pim van der Harst, Anders Hamsten, Hugh Watkins, Albert Hofman, Jacqueline C Witteman, M Carola Zillikens, André G Uitterlinden, Fernando Rivadeneira, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Sita H Vermeulen, Gonçalo R Abecasis, David Schlessinger, Sabine Schipf, Michael Stumvoll, Anke Tönjes, Tim D Spector, Kari E North, Guillaume Lettre, Mark I McCarthy, Sonja I Berndt, Andrew C Heath, Pamela A F Madden, Dale R Nyholt, Grant W Montgomery, Nicholas G Martin, Barbara McKnight, David P Strachan, William G Hill, Harold Snieder, Paul M Ridker, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Kari Stefansson, Timothy M Frayling, Joel N Hirschhorn, Michael E Goddard, Peter M Visscher.
Nature
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There is evidence across several species for genetic control of phenotypic variation of complex traits, such that the variance among phenotypes is genotype dependent. Understanding genetic control of variability is important in evolutionary biology, agricultural selection programmes and human medicine, yet for complex traits, no individual genetic variants associated with variance, as opposed to the mean, have been identified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of phenotypic variation using ?170,000 samples on height and body mass index (BMI) in human populations. We report evidence that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7202116 at the FTO gene locus, which is known to be associated with obesity (as measured by mean BMI for each rs7202116 genotype), is also associated with phenotypic variability. We show that the results are not due to scale effects or other artefacts, and find no other experiment-wise significant evidence for effects on variability, either at loci other than FTO for BMI or at any locus for height. The difference in variance for BMI among individuals with opposite homozygous genotypes at the FTO locus is approximately 7%, corresponding to a difference of ?0.5?kilograms in the standard deviation of weight. Our results indicate that genetic variants can be discovered that are associated with variability, and that between-person variability in obesity can partly be explained by the genotype at the FTO locus. The results are consistent with reported FTO by environment interactions for BMI, possibly mediated by DNA methylation. Our BMI results for other SNPs and our height results for all SNPs suggest that most genetic variants, including those that influence mean height or mean BMI, are not associated with phenotypic variance, or that their effects on variability are too small to detect even with samples sizes greater than 100,000.
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Proteomic profiling implies mitochondrial dysfunction in tachycardia-induced heart failure.
J. Card. Fail.
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Molecular mechanisms of congestive heart failure as reflected by alterations of protein expression patterns are still incompletely analyzed. We therefore investigated intraventricular (ie, left ventricular congestive heart failure [LV-CHF] vs. LV-control [CTRL], and right ventricular [RV]-CHF vs. RV-CTRL) and interventricular (ie, LV-CHF vs. RV-CHF, and LV-CTRL vs. RV-CTRL) protein expression differences in an animal model.
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Lack of evidence for Schmallenberg virus infection in highly exposed persons, Germany, 2012.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
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Schmallenberg virus, a novel orthobunyavirus, is spreading among ruminants, especially sheep, throughout Europe. To determine the risk for human infection, we conducted a survey among shepherds to assess possible exposure and symptoms. We also performed serologic and molecular assays. No evidence of transmission to humans was detected.
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High seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii antibodies in veterinarians associated with cattle obstetrics, Bavaria, 2009.
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis.
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Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. Infection can result in severe disease. However, little is known about the risk of infection in veterinarians. In a cross-sectional study among German veterinarians, participants provided sera and completed an exposure questionnaire. We investigated predictors for seropositivity using multivariable logistic regression modelling. The 424 participants median age was 40 (18-74) years, and 276 (65%) were female. Sera of 162 (38%) were positive for Coxiella burnetii phase II IgG antibodies (by ELISA and IFAT). Predictors for seropositivity were occupational exposure to cattle (aOR 2.83, 95% CI 1.64-4.87), occupational exposure to sheep (2.09, 1.22-3.58), male sex (1.9, 1.15-3.13), and increasing age (30-39 years: 4.91, 2.00-12.04; 40-49 years: 5.32, 2.12-13.33; >50 years: 6.70, 2.60-17.25; compared with <30 years). When investigating occupational exposure to cattle and sheep in detail in a separate model, the seroprevalence increased with increasing numbers of cattle obstetrics procedures performed per month, and with increasing numbers of individual cattle treated per week. The high antibody prevalence implies a high lifetime-risk of Q fever in veterinarians. Cattle veterinarians, especially those frequently performing obstetrics, should be counseled early in their career on the clinical picture of Q fever, and on specific risks.
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Outbreaks of virulent diarrheagenic Escherichia coli--are we in control?
BMC Med
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Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are the most virulent diarrheagenic E. coli known to date. They can be spread with alarming ease via food as exemplified by a large sprout-borne outbreak of STEC O104:H4 in 2011 that was centered in northern Germany and affected several countries. Effective control of such outbreaks is an important public health task and necessitates early outbreak detection, fast identification of the outbreak vehicle and immediate removal of the suspected food from the market, flanked by consumer advice and measures to prevent secondary spread.In our view, opportunities to improve control of STEC outbreaks lie in early clinical suspicion for STEC infection, timely diagnosis of all STEC at the serotype-level and integrating molecular subtyping information into surveillance systems. Furthermore, conducting analytical studies that supplement patients imperfect food history recall and performing, as an investigative element, product tracebacks, are pivotal but underutilized tools for successful epidemiologic identification of the suspected vehicle in foodborne outbreaks. As a corollary, these tools are amenable to tailor microbiological testing of suspected food. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/12.
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