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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Early-season host switching in Adelphocoris spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) of differing host breadth.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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The mirid bugs Adelphocoris suturalis (Jakovlev), Adelphocoris lineolatus (Goeze) and Adelphocoris fasciaticollis (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae) are common pests of several agricultural crops. These three species have vastly different geographical distributions, phenologies and abundances, all of which are linked to their reliance on local plants. Previous work has shown notable differences in Adelphocoris spp. host use for overwintering. In this study, we assessed the extent to which each of the Adelphocoris spp. relies on some of its major overwinter hosts for spring development. Over the course of four consecutive years (2009-2012), we conducted population surveys on 77 different plant species from 39 families. During the spring, A. fasciaticollis used the broadest range of hosts, as it was found on 35 plant species, followed by A. suturalis (15 species) and A. lineolatus (7 species). Abundances of the species greatly differed between host plants, with A. fasciaticollis reaching the highest abundance on Chinese date (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), whereas both A. suturalis and A. lineolatus preferred alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). The host breadths of the three Adelphocoris spp. differed greatly between subsequent spring and winter seasons. The generalist species exhibited the least host fidelity, with A. suturalis and A. lineolatus using 8 of 22 and 4 of 12 overwinter host species for spring development, respectively. By contrast, the comparative specialist A. fasciaticollis relied on 9 of its 11 overwinter plants as early-season hosts. We highlight important seasonal changes in host breadth and interspecific differences in the extent of host switching behavior between the winter and spring seasons. These findings benefit our understanding of the evolutionary interactions between mirid bugs and their host plants and can be used to guide early-season population management.
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Preference of a polyphagous mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) for flowering host plants.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is one of the most important herbivores in a broad range of cultivated plants, including cotton, cereals, vegetables, and fruit crops in China. In this manuscript, we report on a 6-year long study in which (adult) A. lucorum abundance was recorded on 174 plant species from 39 families from early July to mid-September. Through the study period per year, the proportion of flowering plants exploited by adult A. lucorum was significantly greater than that of non-flowering plants. For a given plant species, A. lucorum adults reached peak abundance at the flowering stage, when the plant had the greatest attraction to the adults. More specifically, mean adult abundance on 26 species of major host plants and their relative standard attraction were 10.3-28.9 times and 9.3-19.5 times higher at flowering stage than during non-flowering periods, respectively. Among all the tested species, A. lucorum adults switched food plants according to the succession of flowering plant species. In early July, A. lucorum adults preferred some plant species in bloom, such as Vigna radiata, Gossypium hirsutum, Helianthus annuus and Chrysanthemum coronarium; since late July, adults dispersed into other flowering hosts (e.g. Ricinus communis, Impatiens balsamina, Humulus scandens, Ocimum basilicum, Agastache rugosus and Coriandrum sativum); in early September, they largely migrated to flowering Artemisia spp. (e.g. A. argyi, A. lavandulaefolia, A. annua and A. scoparia). Our findings underscore the important role of flowering plays in the population dynamics and inter-plant migration of this mirid bug. Also, our work helps understand evolutionary aspects of host plant use in polyphagous insects such as A. lucorum, and provides baseline information for the development of sustainable management strategies of this key agricultural pest.
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Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) under laboratory conditions.
J. Econ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2011
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The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is one of the most important pests in tropical and subtropical agriculture and is a key pest in greenhouse production worldwide. Current management of B. tabaci relies upon frequent applications of insecticides. Insecticide use not only directly affects pest populations through acute toxicity but also has indirect (sublethal) effects on pest physiology or behavior. In this study, we described sublethal effects of imidacloprid on adult feeding, immature development, adult fecundity, and F1 development of B. tabaci. Honeydew excretion of adults feeding on leaves treated with LC20 and LC40 concentration was significantly lower than that on untreated leaf discs. Egg production of B. tabaci adults subject to LC20 and LC40 concentrations also was less than untreated individuals. Upon transfer to untreated leaves, honeydew excretion and egg production recovered well within 24 and 48 h, respectively. Exposure to LC20 and LC40 concentrations significantly affected developmental time of B. tabaci eggs and nymphs, whereas it did not affect adult molting rate. We did not find sublethal effects on longevity and fecundity of B. tabaci adults when exposed to LC90 and LC40 concentrations for 24 h, and on egg hatching rate, nymphal mortality, and molting rate of the subsequent F1 generation. Exposure to imidacloprid at LC40 concentration significantly decreased the number of females in the F1 generation. Imidacloprid negatively affects development and reproduction of exposed individuals, and sex ratio of subsequent (F1) generation of B. tabaci, which probably disrupts B. tabaci population dynamics, slows population increase, and reduces infestation levels. Therefore, it is necessary to consider potential impact from imidacloprid for integrated management of the pest.
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Frequency of Bt resistance alleles in Helicoverpa armigera in the Xinjiang cotton-planting region of China.
Environ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2010
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Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a key insect pest of cotton in Xinjiang cotton-planting region of northwest China. In this region, cotton is grown on average ? 1.65 million ha (1.53 ? 1.80 million ha) annually in largely monoculture agricultural landscapes, similarly to cropping systems in the United States or Australia. Under such cropping regimes, naturally occurring refuges (with non-Bt crops) may be insufficient to prevent H. armigera resistance development to Bt toxins. Therefore, we assessed frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac toxin of F(1) and F(2) offspring of H. armigera isofemale lines from two distinct localities in the region during 2005-2009. More specifically, a total of 224 isofemale lines was collected from Korla County (? 70% Bt cotton adoption) and 402 lines from Shache County (? 5% Bt cotton planting). Subsequent offspring was screened on Cry1Ac artificial diet. From 2005 to 2009, resistance gene frequency in Korla fluctuated between 0.0000 and 0.0040, while being 0.0000-0.0008 in individuals collected from Shache, and there were no significant increases in both counties from 2005 to 2009. Relative average development rates (RADRs) of larvae in F(1) tests showed significant increases from Korla, but not in Shache. RADR of F(1) larvae is significantly correlated with RADR of F(2) offspring, indicating genetic variation in response to toxin in field H. armigera population. Although the occurrence of Cry1Ac resistance alleles was low in Xinjiang cotton-planting region of China, particular attention should be given to H. armigera resistance development in Korla County.
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Mirid bug outbreaks in multiple crops correlated with wide-scale adoption of Bt cotton in China.
Science
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2010
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Long-term ecological effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops on nontarget pests have received limited attention, more so in diverse small holder-based cropping systems of the developing world. Field trials conducted over 10 years in northern China show that mirid bugs (Heteroptera: Miridae) have progressively increased population sizes and acquired pest status in cotton and multiple other crops, in association with a regional increase in Bt cotton adoption. More specifically, our analyses show that Bt cotton has become a source of mirid bugs and that their population increases are related to drops in insecticide use in this crop. Hence, alterations of pest management regimes in Bt cotton could be responsible for the appearance and subsequent spread of nontarget pests at an agro-landscape level.
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Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) to caterpillar-induced volatiles from cotton.
Environ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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Microplitis mediator Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an important larval endoparasitoid of various lepidopteran pests, including Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner). In China, H. armigera is a key pest of cotton and is currently the focus of several biological control efforts that use M. mediator as principal natural enemy of this pest. To improve the success of biological control efforts, behavioral studies are needed that shed light on the interaction between M. mediator and H. armigera. In this study, we determined M. mediator response to volatile compounds from undamaged, mechanically injured, or H. armigera--damaged plants and identified attractive volatiles. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, we found that mechanically damaged plants and/or plants treated with H. armigera oral secretions did not attract wasps. However, volatiles from H. armigera-damaged plants elicited a strong attraction of both M. mediator sexes. Headspace extracts from H. armigera-damaged cotton were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), and a total of seven different compounds were found to elicit electroantennogram (EAG) responses, including an unknown compound. Six different EAD-active volatiles were identified from caterpillar-damaged cotton plants, of which 3, 7-dimethyl-1, 3, 6-octatriene and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate were the principal compounds. Olfactometer assays indicated that individual synthetic compounds of 3, 7-dimethyl-1, 3, 6-octatriene, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, and nonanal were attractive to M. mediator. Field cage studies showed that parasitism of H. armigera larvae by M. mediator was higher on cotton plants to which 3,7-dimethyl-1,3, 6-octatriene was applied. Our results show that the combination of terpenoids and green leaf volatiles may not only facilitate host, mate, or food location but may also increase H. armigera parasitism by M. mediator.
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Relationship of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) to soybean plant nutrients, landscape structure, and natural enemies.
Environ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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In the north central United States, populations of the exotic soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), are highly variable across space, complicating effective aphid management. In this study we examined relationships of plant nutrients, landscape structure, and natural enemies with soybean aphid abundance across Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, representing the range of conditions where soybean aphid outbreaks have occurred since its introduction. We sampled soybean aphid and its natural enemies, quantified vegetation land cover and measured soybean nutrients (potassium [K] and nitrogen [N]) in 26 soybean sites in 2005 and 2006. Multiple regression models found that aphid abundance was negatively associated with leaf K content in 2005, whereas it was negatively associated with habitat diversity (Simpsons index) and positively associated with leaf N content in 2006. These variables accounted for 25 and 27% of aphid variability in 2005 and 2006, respectively, suggesting that other sources of variability are also important. In addition, K content of soybean plants decreased with increasing prevalence of corn-soybean cropland in 2005, suggesting that landscapes that have a high intensification of agriculture (as indexed by increasing corn and soybean) are more likely to have higher aphid numbers. Soybean aphid natural enemies, 26 species of predators and parasitoids, was positively related to aphid abundance; however, enemy-to-aphid abundance ratios were inversely related to aphid density, suggesting that soybean aphids are able to escape control by resident natural enemies. Overall, soybean aphid abundance was most associated with soybean leaf chemistry and landscape heterogeneity. Agronomic options that can ameliorate K deficiency and maintaining heterogeneity in the landscape may reduce aphid risk.
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Trade-offs between flight and fecundity in the soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).
J. Econ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is native to eastern Asia and was accidentally introduced into North America in 2000. Within a few years, it was found throughout the U.S. and Canadian soybean-growing regions. The spread of A. glycines in North America is partly ascribed to its great flight capacity. We conducted direct measurements of flight performance of winged A. glycines adults and correlated this to their subsequent longevity and fecundity to determine whether there are trade-offs between flight and fecundity. We also estimated fecundity and development time of the offspring of females that had flown varying distances to examine potential maternal effects linked to flight. The experiment was conducted using a specifically designed aphid flight mill system in which winged aphids were tethered by their abdomens and flight duration, distance and speed were quantified. Fecundity, longevity and reproductive periods of 12-h-old A. glycines alates that had engaged in > 0.5 km long flights were significantly lower than those of < 0.5-km individuals. The offspring of alates with flight experiences of > 1.5 km also had lower fecundity than those produced by individuals that had engaged in flights < 1.5 km. Our results are therefore consistent both with direct trade-offs between flight and fecundity and a trade-off between flight and fecundity via maternal effects.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.