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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Variation in the PTH2R gene is associated with age-related degenerative changes in the lumbar spine.
J. Bone Miner. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2015
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In the elderly, degenerative changes in the lumbar spine are common, contributing to falsely elevated bone mineral density (BMD) values. The parathyroid hormone (PTH) system plays an important role in the regulation of bone turnover and we explore the hypothesis that polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes in this pathway (PTH, PTHLH, PTH1R and PTH2R) contribute to degenerative manifestations of the spine in elderly women. The study included 1,004 Swedish women aged 75 years from the population-based OPRA cohort who attended follow-up at 5 and 10 years. Lumbar spine BMD was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and each individual vertebra was evaluated visually on the DXA image for apparent degenerative manifestations. Six SNPs in PTH and 3 SNPs each in PTH1R, PTH2R and PTHLH were analysed. Among women with degenerative manifestations at the lumbar spine, there was an over-representation at baseline of those carrying the PTH2R SNP rs897083 A-allele (p = 0.0021; odds ratio 1.5 95 % CI 1.2-2.0) and across the duration of follow-up (p = 0.0008). No association was observed between degenerative manifestations and variation in the other genes. None of the PTH hormone system genes were associated with vertebral fracture. Variation in the PTH2R gene (Chr2q34, rs897083) may contribute to the age-associated degenerative manifestations that develop at the lumbar spine.
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External validity of a population-based study on osteoporosis and fracture.
Acta Orthop
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2014
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Little is known about the characteristics of non-participants in epidemiological studies. We evaluated external validity by comparing fracture and mortality rate in participants and non-participants in a longitudinal study on risk factors for fracture.
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Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium.
Alireza Moayyeri, Yi-Hsiang Hsu, David Karasik, Karol Estrada, Su-Mei Xiao, Carrie Nielson, Priya Srikanth, Sylvie Giroux, Scott G Wilson, Hou-Feng Zheng, Albert V Smith, Stephen R Pye, Paul J Leo, Alexander Teumer, Joo-Yeon Hwang, Claes Ohlsson, Fiona McGuigan, Ryan L Minster, Caroline Hayward, José M Olmos, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Joshua R Lewis, Karin M A Swart, Laura Masi, Chris Oldmeadow, Elizabeth G Holliday, Sulin Cheng, Natasja M van Schoor, Nicholas C Harvey, Marcin Kruk, Fabiola Del Greco M, Wilmar Igl, Olivia Trummer, Efi Grigoriou, Robert Luben, Ching-Ti Liu, Yanhua Zhou, Ling Oei, Carolina Medina-Gomez, Joseph Zmuda, Greg Tranah, Suzanne J Brown, Frances M Williams, Nicole Soranzo, Johanna Jakobsdottir, Kristin Siggeirsdottir, Kate L Holliday, Anke Hannemann, Min Jin Go, Melissa Garcia, Ozren Polašek, Marika Laaksonen, Kun Zhu, Anke W Enneman, Mark McEvoy, Roseanne Peel, Pak Chung Sham, Maciej Jaworski, Asa Johansson, Andrew A Hicks, Pawel Pludowski, Rodney Scott, Rosalie A M Dhonukshe-Rutten, Nathalie van der Velde, Mika Kähönen, Jorma S Viikari, Harri Sievänen, Olli T Raitakari, Jesús González-Macías, José L Hernández, Dan Mellström, Osten Ljunggren, Yoon Shin Cho, Uwe Völker, Matthias Nauck, Georg Homuth, Henry Völzke, Robin Haring, Matthew A Brown, Eugene McCloskey, Geoffrey C Nicholson, Richard Eastell, John A Eisman, Graeme Jones, Ian R Reid, Elaine M Dennison, John Wark, Steven Boonen, Dirk Vanderschueren, Frederick C W Wu, Thor Aspelund, J Brent Richards, Doug Bauer, Albert Hofman, Kay-Tee Khaw, George Dedoussis, Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch, Ulf Gyllensten, Peter P Pramstaller, Roman S Lorenc, Cyrus Cooper, Annie Wai Chee Kung, Paul Lips, Markku Alen, John Attia, Maria Luisa Brandi, Lisette C P G M de Groot, Terho Lehtimäki, José A Riancho, Harry Campbell, Yongmei Liu, Tamara B Harris, Kristina Akesson, Magnus Karlsson, Jong-Young Lee, Henri Wallaschofski, Emma L Duncan, Terence W O'Neill, Vilmundur Gudnason, Timothy D Spector, François Rousseau, Eric Orwoll, Steven R Cummings, Nick J Wareham, Fernando Rivadeneira, André G Uitterlinden, Richard L Prince, Douglas P Kiel, Jonathan Reeve, Stephen K Kaptoge.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10(-14)). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10(-6) also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology.
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Variation in the MC4R gene is associated with bone phenotypes in elderly Swedish women.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. Fat mass is a determinant of bone strength and both phenotypes have a strong genetic component. In this study, we examined the association between obesity associated polymorphisms (SNPs) with body composition, BMD, Ultrasound (QUS), fracture and biomarkers (Homocysteine (Hcy), folate, Vitamin D and Vitamin B12) for obesity and osteoporosis. Five common variants: rs17782313 and rs1770633 (melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R); rs7566605 (insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2); rs9939609 and rs1121980 (fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) were genotyped in 2 cohorts of Swedish women: PEAK-25 (age 25, n?=?1061) and OPRA (age 75, n?=?1044). Body mass index (BMI), total body fat and lean mass were strongly positively correlated with QUS and BMD in both cohorts (r(2)?=?0.2-0.6). MC4R rs17782313 was associated with QUS in the OPRA cohort and individuals with the minor C-allele had higher values compared to T-allele homozygotes (TT vs. CT vs.
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Secondary fracture prevention: plucking the low hanging fruit.
Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2013
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It is well known that one fragility fracture begets another. Fracture Liaison Services have been shown to narrow the care gap that exists in the care of patients with fragility fractures. A secondary fracture prevention programme "OPTIMAL" (Osteoporosis Patient Targeted and Integrated Management for Active Living) has been in existence in the public restructured hospitals and polyclinics of Singapore since 2008 and this is beginning to show significant beneficial results in terms of identification and management of fragility fractures. However, significant obstacles in the path of appropriate management of the patient with a fragility fracture still exist. A concerted, multipronged and interdisciplinary approach is needed to overcome these barriers.
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Patient-reported outcome after displaced femoral neck fracture: a national survey of 4467 patients.
J Bone Joint Surg Am
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2013
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Arthroplasty appears to be superior to internal fixation, with regard to complication rates, as a treatment for displaced femoral neck fractures. Less is known about the result as perceived by the patient. The aims of this prospective observational study were (1) to determine whether patient-reported outcomes after a displaced femoral neck fracture can be evaluated on a nationwide basis by means of a mailed survey, and (2) to evaluate differences among treatment methods with respect to patient-reported pain, health-related quality of life, and satisfaction with the surgical result.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide studies identifies WNT16 and ESR1 SNPs associated with bone mineral density in premenopausal women.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2013
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Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants in genes associated with variation in bone mineral density (BMD), although most have been carried out in combined samples of older women and men. Meta-analyses of these results have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of modest effect at genome-wide significance levels in genes involved in both bone formation and resorption, as well as other pathways. We performed a meta-analysis restricted to premenopausal white women from four cohorts (n?=?4061 women, aged 20 to 45 years) to identify genes influencing peak bone mass at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. After imputation, age- and weight-adjusted bone-mineral density (BMD) values were tested for association with each SNP. Association of an SNP in the WNT16 gene (rs3801387; p?=?1.7?×?10(-9) ) and multiple SNPs in the ESR1/C6orf97 region (rs4870044; p?=?1.3?×?10(-8) ) achieved genome-wide significance levels for lumbar spine BMD. These SNPs, along with others demonstrating suggestive evidence of association, were then tested for association in seven replication cohorts that included premenopausal women of European, Hispanic-American, and African-American descent (combined n?=?5597 for femoral neck; n?=?4744 for lumbar spine). When the data from the discovery and replication cohorts were analyzed jointly, the evidence was more significant (WNT16 joint p?=?1.3?×?10(-11) ; ESR1/C6orf97 joint p?=?1.4?×?10(-10) ). Multiple independent association signals were observed with spine BMD at the ESR1 region after conditioning on the primary signal. Analyses of femoral neck BMD also supported association with SNPs in WNT16 and ESR1/C6orf97 (p?
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Adverse effects of smoking on peak bone mass may be attenuated by higher body mass index in young female smokers.
Calcif. Tissue Int.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Smoking is associated with postmenopausal bone loss and fracture, but the effect of smoking on bone in younger women is unclear. Peak bone mass is an important determinant for fracture risk; therefore, our aim was to evaluate the association between smoking and bone mass in 25-year-old women, specifically the influence of daily cigarette consumption and total exposure, duration, age at starting smoking, and time since smoking cessation on bone density and fracture risk. Smoking and bone mineral density (BMD) data were available for 1,054 women from the PEAK-25 cohort. Analyses comparing current smokers with women who never smoked were performed using number of cigarettes per day, pack-years, smoking duration, age smoking started, and, for former smokers, age at quitting. BMD did not differ between never, former, and current smokers; and the relative fracture risk in smokers was not significant (relative risk [RR] = 1.2, 95 % confidence interval 0.8-1.9). Among current smokers, BMD decreased with a dose response as cigarette consumption increased (femoral neck p = 0.037). BMD was not significantly lower in young women who had smoked for long duration or started smoking early (p = 0.07-0.64); long duration and early start were associated with higher body mass index (BMI; p = 0.038). Lower BMD persisted up to 24 months after smoking cessation (p = 0.027-0.050), becoming comparable to never-smokers after 24 months. Hip BMD was negatively associated with smoking and dose-dependent on cigarette consumption. Smoking duration was not associated with BMD, although young women with a long smoking history had higher BMI, which might attenuate the adverse effects from smoking.
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Country-Specific Young Adult Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Reference Data Are Warranted for T-Score Calculations in Women: Data From the Peak-25 Cohort.
J Clin Densitom
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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The aims of this study were to provide normative data for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 25-yr-old women and evaluate whether young adult Swedish women have bone mineral density (BMD) comparable with DXA manufacturer reference values and other equivalent populations. BMD at all sites was measured in the population-based Peak-25 cohort (n = 1061 women; age, 25.5 ± 0.2yr). BMD values were standardized (sBMD) and compared against the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and other cohorts. Based on the DXA manufacturer-supplied reference values, Z-scores were 0.54 ± 0.98 (femoral neck [FN]), 0.47 ± 0.96 (total hip [TH]), and 0.32 ± 1.03 (lumbar spine [LS]). In comparison with other studies, sBMD was higher in the Peak-25 cohort (FN, 1.5%-8.3%; TH, 3.9%-9.2%; and LS, 2.4%-6.5%) with the exception of trochanter-sBMD which was 2.5% lower compared with NHANES III. The concordance in identifying those in the lowest or highest quartile of BMD was highest between hip measurements (low, 71%-78% and high, 70%-84%), corresponding discordance of 0%-1%. At this age, the correlation between DXA sites was strong (r = 0.62-0.94). BMD in Swedish young adult women is generally higher than has been reported in other equivalently aged European and North American cohorts and suggests that the high fracture incidence in Sweden is not explained by lower peak bone mass. The use of nonregional-specific DXA reference data could contribute to misdiagnosed osteoporosis in elderly women.
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Changes in implant choice and surgical technique for hemiarthroplasty. 21,346 procedures from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register 2005-2009.
Acta Orthop
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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Treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in Sweden has shifted towards more arthroplasties, especially hemiarthroplasties. We describe the hemiarthroplasty population in Sweden 2005 through 2009.
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Physical activity and joint function in adults with severe haemophilia on long-term prophylaxis.
Blood Coagul. Fibrinolysis
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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It has been shown that patients with severe haemophilia treated on demand are not as physically active as their healthy peers and often have a sedentary lifestyle that contributes to chronic joint disease. The use of prophylaxis provides opportunities for participation in physical activities with fewer bleeding episodes. The objective of the study was to describe the type, intensity and duration of physical activity among adult patients with severe haemophilia and to find out whether a joint function dependency exists. Patients with severe haemophilia, divided into two groups (group A: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of ?3 years and group B: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of >3 years), and 190 controls were included. Physical activity was assessed using the self-report Modifiable Activity Questionnaire. Time involved and intensity of all aspects of physical activity for group A were almost similar to their healthy peers. Group B had significantly lower vigorous, leisure and total physical activities than group A and their healthy peers. Positive significant correlations were found between leisure and total physical activities and joint score in group A, whereas in group B, there was negative significant correlation between only nonweight-bearing activity and joint score. The early start of long-term, primary prophylaxis has been successful in reducing frequency of bleeds and thereby preventing or delaying subsequent chronic joint disease, and enables the patients to lead a physically normal life also during adulthood when patients with haemophilia treated on demand are expected to have substantial joint disease impacting their physical activity.
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Hip fracture in men-survival and subsequent fractures: a cohort study with 22-year follow-up.
J Am Geriatr Soc
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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To evaluate the influence of age on survival and risk of subsequent fracture in men with hip fracture, applying a residual lifetime perspective.
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LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.
Bone
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/?-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.
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Identification of candidate gene regions in the rat by co-localization of QTLs for bone density, size, structure and strength.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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Susceptibility to osteoporotic fracture is influenced by genetic factors that can be dissected by whole-genome linkage analysis in experimental animal crosses. The aim of this study was to characterize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for biomechanical and two-dimensional dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) phenotypes in reciprocal F2 crosses between diabetic GK and normo-glycemic F344 rat strains and to identify possible co-localization with previously reported QTLs for bone size and structure. The biomechanical measurements of rat tibia included ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure while DXA was used to characterize tibial area, bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). F2 progeny (108 males, 98 females) were genotyped with 192 genome-wide markers followed by sex- and reciprocal cross-separated whole-genome QTL analyses. Significant QTLs were identified on chromosome 8 (tibial area; logarithm of odds (LOD)?=?4.7 and BMC; LOD?=?4.1) in males and on chromosome 1 (stiffness; LOD?=?5.5) in females. No QTLs showed significant sex-specific interactions. In contrast, significant cross-specific interactions were identified on chromosome 2 (aBMD; LOD?=?4.7) and chromosome 6 (BMC; LOD?=?4.8) for males carrying F344mtDNA, and on chromosome 15 (ultimate force; LOD?=?3.9) for males carrying GKmtDNA, confirming the effect of reciprocal cross on osteoporosis-related phenotypes. By combining identified QTLs for biomechanical-, size- and qualitative phenotypes (pQCT and 3D CT) from the same population, overlapping regions were detected on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10. These are strong candidate regions in the search for genetic risk factors for osteoporosis.
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Effect of precision on longitudinal follow-up of bone mineral density measurements in elderly women and men.
J Clin Densitom
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2010
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Precision error of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry exceeds the expected annual rate of bone loss in the elderly. The capacity to detect changes in areal bone mineral density (aBMD; g/cm(2)) over a 5-yr period was assessed. Six hundred ninety-one women, 75.2 (0.1)yr, from the Malmö OPRA-study, were measured using Lunar DPX-L (GE Lunar, Madison, WI), and 211 men, 74.7 (3.2)yr, from the Malmö Mr Os-study, were measured using Lunar Prodigy (GE Lunar) with follow-up 5 yr later. Precision error was determined with 30 degrees of freedom. Least significant change (LSC, i.e., 2.77 × precision error) was calculated. Womens precision errors (g/cm(2)) for DPX-L were 0.028 (total hip [TH]) and 0.016 (lumbar spine [LS]), and for Prodigy, they were 0.009 (TH) and 0.039 (LS). In men, corresponding results for Prodigy were 0.014 and 0.031. In women, 41% and in men, 39% had aBMD changes exceeding the LSC at TH. Follow-up intervals (i.e., LSC/median rate of aBMD change) for both women and men were 8 yr (TH) and 13 yr (LS). Based on Prodigy precision data, follow-up intervals for women were 3 and 32 yr at TH and LS. In summary, several years were needed to detect change. Only when a high rate of bone loss is suspected, a short follow-up time is possible, in elderly persons.
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Osteocalcin gene polymorphisms influence concentration of serum osteocalcin and enhance fracture identification.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2010
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Osteoporosis is a major health problem affecting more than 75 million people throughout Europe, the United States, and Japan. Epidemiologic studies have determined that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. We have investigated the association between polymorphisms at the osteocalcin locus and variables linked to bone health. Osteocalcin provides a link between bone and energy metabolism, hence its potential importance as an osteoporosis candidate gene. In this study, we included a total of 996 women (all aged 75 years) from the Osteoporosis Prospective Risk Assessment (OPRA) cohort. We sequenced the osteocalcin gene along with flanking regions to search for novel coding polymorphisms. We also analyzed four polymorphisms selected from within and flanking regions of the osteocalcin gene to study their association with serum total osteocalcin levels (S-TotalOC), total-body (TB) bone mineral density (BMD), fracture, TB fat mass, and body mass index (BMI). The promoter polymorphism rs1800247 was significantly associated with S-TotalOC (p = .012) after controlling for BMI and TB BMD. The polymorphism rs1543297 was significantly associated with prospectively occurring fractures (p = .008). In a model taking into account rs1543297 and rs1800247, along with TB BMD, BMI, smoking, and S-TotalOC, the polymorphisms together were able to identify an additional 6% of women who sustained a fracture (p = .02). We found no association between the polymorphisms and TB BMD, BMI, or TB fat mass. In conclusion, polymorphisms in and around the osteocalcin locus are significantly associated with S-TotalOC and fracture. Genotyping at the osteocalcin locus could add valuable information in the identification of women at risk of osteoporosis.
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Polymorphisms in the macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and bone loss in postmenopausal women.
Bone
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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Osteoporosis is a severe condition in postmenopausal women and a common cause of fracture. Osteoporosis is a complex disease with a strong genetic impact, but susceptibility is determined by many genes with modest effects and environmental factors. Only a handful of genes consistently associated with osteoporosis have been identified so far. Inflammation affects bone metabolism by interfering with the interplay between bone resorption and formation, and many inflammatory mediators are involved in natural bone remodeling. The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to affect bone density in rodents, and polymorphisms in the human MIF promoter are associated with inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in the MIF gene with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone loss in 1002 elderly women using MIF promoter polymorphisms MIF-CATT(5-8) and rs755622(G/C) located -794 and -173 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Bone loss was estimated both by the change in BMD over 5 years and by the levels of bone resorption markers in serum measured at four occasions during a 5-year period. The MIF-CATT(7)/rs755622(C) haplotype was associated with increased rate of bone loss during 5 years at the femoral neck (p<0.05) and total hip (p<0.05). In addition, the MIF-CATT(7)/rs755622(C) haplotype carriers had higher levels of the bone turnover marker serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (S-CTX-I, p<0.01) during the 5 year follow-up period. There was no association between MIF-CATT(7)/rs755622(C) and baseline BMD at femoral neck, total hip or lumbar spine. We conclude that MIF promoter polymorphisms have modest effects on bone remodeling and are associated with the rate of bone loss in elderly women.
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Genetic loci for bone architecture determined by three-dimensional CT in crosses with the diabetic GK rat.
Bone
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2010
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The F344 rat carries alleles contributing to bone fragility while the GK rat spontaneously develops type-2 diabetes. These characteristics make F344×GK crosses well suited for the identification of genes related to bone size and allow for future investigation on the association with type-2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for bone size phenotypes measured by a new application of three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and to investigate the effects of sex- and reciprocal cross. Tibia from male and female GK and F344 rats, representing the parental, F1 and F2 generations, were examined with 3DCT and analyzed for: total and cortical volumetric BMD, straight and curved length, peri- and endosteal area at mid-shaft. F2 progeny (108 male and 98 female) were genotyped with 192 genome-wide microsatellite markers (average distance 10 cM). Sex- and reciprocal cross-separated QTL analyses were performed for the identification of QTLs linked to 3DCT phenotypes and true interactions were confirmed by likelihood ratio analysis in all F2 animals. Several genome-wide significant QTLs were found in the sex- and reciprocal cross-separated progeny on chromosomes (chr) 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 14, and 17. Overlapping QTLs for both males and females in the (GK×F344)F2 progeny were located on chr 1 (39-67 cM). This region confirms previously reported pQCT QTLs and overlaps loci for fasting glucose. Sex separated linkage analysis confirmed a male specific QTL on chr 9 (67-82 cM) for endosteal area at the fibula site. Analyses separating the F2 population both by sex and reciprocal cross identified cross specific QTLs on chr 14 (males) and chr 3 and 4 (females). Two loci, chr 4 and 6, are unique to 3DCT and separate from pQCT generated loci. The 3DCT method was highly reproducible and provided high precision measurements of bone size in the rat enabling identification of new sex- and cross-specific loci. The QTLs on chr 1 indicate potential genetic association between bone-related phenotypes and traits affecting type-2 diabetes. The results illustrate the complexity of the genetic architecture of bone size phenotypes and demonstrate the importance of complementary methods for bone analysis.
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Genetic regulation of bone traits is influenced by sex and reciprocal cross in F(2) progeny from GK and F344 rats.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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A genome-wide linkage analysis to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for bone phenotypes was performed in an F(2) intercross of inbred spontaneously type 2 diabetic GK and normoglycemic F344 rats (108 males and 98 females). The aim of the study was to locate genome regions with candidate genes affecting trabecular and cortical bone and to investigate the effects of sex and reciprocal cross. pQCT was used to determine tibial bone phenotypes in the F(2) rats, comprising reciprocal crosses with divergent mitochondrial (mt) DNA. Sex and reciprocal cross-separated QTL analyses were performed followed by assessment of specific interactions. Four genome-wide significant QTLs linked to either cortical vBMD, tibia length, body length, or metaphyseal area were identified in males on chromosomes (chr) 1, 8, and 15. In females, three significant QTLs linked to cortical BMC or metaphyseal total vBMD were identified on chr 1 and 2. Several additional suggestive loci for trabecular and cortical traits were detected in both males and females. Four female-specific QTLs on chr 2, 3, 5, and 10 and four reciprocal cross-specific QTLs on chr 1, 10, and 18 were identified, suggesting that both sex and mt genotype influence the expression of bone phenotypes.
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Early rheumatoid arthritis and body composition.
Rheumatology (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2009
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RA is associated with joint destruction and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Possible predictors for CVD are early changes in body composition. We therefore evaluated whether lean mass of arms and legs (LMAL), total body fat mass (BFM) or truncal fat distribution (TFD) are altered early in RA, and if so, which factors are associated.
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Polymorphisms in the inflammatory genes CIITA, CLEC16A and IFNG influence BMD, bone loss and fracture in elderly women.
PLoS ONE
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Osteoclast activity and the fine balance between bone formation and resorption is affected by inflammatory factors such as cytokines and T lymphocyte activity, mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, in turn regulated by the MHC class II transactivator (MHC2TA). We investigated the effect of functional polymorphisms in the MHC2TA gene (CIITA), and two additional genes; C-type lectin domain 16A (CLEC16A), in linkage disequilibrium with CIITA and Interferon-? (IFNG), an inducer of CIITA; on bone density, bone resorption markers, bone loss and fracture risk in 75 year-old women followed for up to 10 years (OPRA n = 1003) and in young adult women (PEAK-25 n = 999). CIITA was associated with BMD at age 75 (lumbar spine p = 0.011; femoral neck (FN) p = 0.049) and age 80 (total body p = 0.015; total hip p = 0.042; FN p = 0.028). Carriers of the CIITA rs3087456(G) allele had 1.8-3.4% higher BMD and displayed increased rate of bone loss between age 75 and 80 (FN p = 0.013; total hip p = 0.030; total body p = 3.8E(-5)). Despite increasing bone loss, the rs3087456(G) allele was protective against incident fracture overall (p = 0.002), osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture. Carriers of CLEC16A and IFNG variant alleles had lower BMD (p<0.05) and ultrasound parameters and a lower risk of incident fracture (CLEC16A, p = 0.011). In 25-year old women, none of the genes were associated with BMD. In conclusion, variation in inflammatory genes CIITA, CLEC-16A and INFG appear to contribute to bone phenotypes in elderly women and suggest a role for low-grade inflammation and MHC class II expression for osteoporosis pathogenesis.
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Higher risk of reoperation for bipolar and uncemented hemiarthroplasty.
Acta Orthop
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Hemiarthroplasty as treatment for femoral neck fractures has increased markedly in Sweden during the last decade. In this prospective observational study, we wanted to identify risk factors for reoperation in modular hemiarthroplasties and to evaluate mortality in this patient group.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.