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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2014
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Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia.
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Similar recombination-activating gene (RAG) mutations result in similar immunobiological effects but in different clinical phenotypes.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2014
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V(D)J recombination takes place during lymphocyte development to generate a large repertoire of T- and B-cell receptors. Mutations in recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 result in loss or reduction of V(D)J recombination. It is known that different mutations in RAG genes vary in residual recombinase activity and give rise to a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes.
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Clinical and immunological manifestations of patients with atypical severe combined immunodeficiency.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Hypomorphic mutations in genes associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or Omenn syndrome can also cause milder immunodeficiencies. We report 10 new patients with such "atypical" SCID and summarize 63 patients from the literature. The patient groups with T(low)B(low) (n=28), T(low)B(+) (n=16) and ADA (n=29) SCID variants had similar infection profiles but differed in the frequency of immune dysregulation, which was observed predominantly in patients with recombination defects. Most immunological parameters were remarkably similar in the three groups. Of note, 19/68 patients with "atypical" SCID had normal T cell counts, 48/68 had normal IgG and 23/46 had at least one normal specific antibody titer. Elevated IgE was a characteristic feature of ADA deficiency. This overview characterizes "atypical" SCID as a distinct disease with immune dysregulation in addition to infection susceptibility. Lymphopenia, reduced naïve T cells and elevated IgE are suggestive, but not consistent features of the disease.
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X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to SAP/SH2D1A deficiency: a multicenter study on the manifestations, management and outcome of the disease.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2010
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X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) is a rare immunodeficiency characterized by severe immune dysregulation and caused by mutations in the SH2D1A/SAP gene. Clinical manifestations are varied and include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia, often triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection. Historical data published before improved treatment regimens shows very poor outcome. We describe a large cohort of 91 genetically defined XLP1 patients collected from centers worldwide and report characteristics and outcome data for 43 patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and 48 untransplanted patients. The advent of better treatment strategies for HLH and malignancy has greatly reduced mortality for these patients, but HLH still remains the most severe feature of XLP1. Survival after allogeneic HSCT is 81.4% with good immune reconstitution in the large majority of patients and little evidence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. However, survival falls to 50% in patients with HLH as a feature of disease. Untransplanted patients have an overall survival of 62.5% with the majority on immunoglobulin replacement therapy, but the outcome for those untransplanted after HLH is extremely poor (18.8%). HSCT should be undertaken in all patients with HLH, because outcome without transplant is extremely poor. The outcome of HSCT for other manifestations of XLP1 is very good, and if HSCT is not undertaken immediately, patients must be monitored closely for evidence of disease progression.
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Treosulfan-based conditioning regimen in a second matched unrelated peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for a pediatric patient with CGD and invasive aspergillosis, who experienced initial graft failure after RIC.
Int. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2009
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Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect of phagocyte NADPH-oxidase and characterized by severe, recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with CGD. We report the case of a 3-year-old boy with CGD, who developed IA despite antifungal prophylaxis. His treatment consisted of a 10-month-long multi-drug antifungal therapy, together with surgery, but these did not cause any substantial clinical improvement. BMT in high-risk patients with CGD remains a challenge due to both, higher risk of graft rejection and inflammatory flare in the course of immune recovery. Our patient rejected the first matched unrelated donor (MUD) allograft after RIC regimen recommended by the EBMT Inborn Errors Working Party for high-risk patients. After treosulfan-based conditioning and second MUD peripheral blood stem cell transplantation both, full reconstitution of the granulocytic series and complete recovery from IA, were achieved.
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Successful haploidentical PBSCT with subsequent T-cell addbacks in a boy with HyperIgM syndrome presenting as severe congenital neutropenia.
Pediatr Transplant
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HIGM syndrome is a group of primary immunodeficiency disorders characterized by recurrent bacterial and opportunistic infections; it is also associated with normal to elevated serum IgM levels and a concomitant deficiency of IgG, IgA, and IgE. In this report, we give account of a boy with X-linked HIGM and a novel Y172C mutation within his CD40LG gene. He presented with severe neutropenia as the dominating symptom. His bone marrow showed maturation arrest at the promyelocyte/myelocyte stage, typical of congenital neutropenia. This boy suffered from life-threatening infections and required high doses of rhG-CSF, and a haploidentical PBSCT was also successfully performed, thus leading to reconstitution of CD40L expression on activated CD4+ T cells (as assessed with flow cytometry six months after the procedure). Two low-dose T-cell addbacks were required to re-establish full donor chimerism and clear CMV reactivation. The report demonstrates that in select cases, alternative donor allogeneic HSCT supported by DLI may be effective in correcting the defect in X-linked HIGM, and HSCT in HIGM children is not necessarily limited to matched sibling donor transplantation.
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Transplantation in patients with SCID: mismatched related stem cells or unrelated cord blood?
Blood
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Pediatric patients with SCID constitute medical emergencies. In the absence of an HLA-identical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donor, mismatched related-donor transplantation (MMRDT) or unrelated-donor umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are valuable treatment options. To help transplantation centers choose the best treatment option, we retrospectively compared outcomes after 175 MMRDTs and 74 UCBTs in patients with SCID or Omenn syndrome. Median follow-up time was 83 months and 58 months for UCBT and MMRDT, respectively. Most UCB recipients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen; most MMRDT recipients did not. UCB recipients presented a higher frequency of complete donor chimerism (P = .04) and faster total lymphocyte count recovery (P = .04) without any statistically significance with the preparative regimen they received. The MMRDT and UCBT groups did not differ in terms of T-cell engraftment, CD4(+) and CD3(+) cell recoveries, while Ig replacement therapy was discontinued sooner after UCBT (adjusted P = .02). There was a trend toward a greater incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD (P = .06) and more chronic GVHD (P = .03) after UCBT. The estimated 5-year overall survival rates were 62% ± 4% after MMRDT and 57% ± 6% after UCBT. For children with SCID and no HLA-identical sibling donor, both UCBT and MMRDT represent available HSC sources for transplantation with quite similar outcomes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.