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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Collagen VI Enhances Cartilage Tissue Generation by Stimulating Chondrocyte Proliferation.
Tissue Eng Part A
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2014
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Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.
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Comparative Potential of Juvenile and Adult Human Articular Chondrocytes for Cartilage Tissue Formation in Three-Dimensional Biomimetic Hydrogels.
Tissue Eng Part A
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair.
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A global increase in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels marks osteoarthritic chondrocytes.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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To investigate the role of the newly discovered epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and its regulators in altered gene expression in osteoarthritis (OA).
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Clinical validation of integrated nucleic acid and protein detection on an electrochemical biosensor array for urinary tract infection diagnosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2011
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Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection that poses a substantial healthcare burden, yet its definitive diagnosis can be challenging. There is a need for a rapid, sensitive and reliable analytical method that could allow early detection of UTI and reduce unnecessary antibiotics. Pathogen identification along with quantitative detection of lactoferrin, a measure of pyuria, may provide useful information towards the overall diagnosis of UTI. Here, we report an integrated biosensor platform capable of simultaneous pathogen identification and detection of urinary biomarker that could aid the effectiveness of the treatment and clinical management.
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Local effect of IL-4 delivery on polyethylene particle induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium.
J Biomed Mater Res A
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Wear particles generated with use of total joint replacements incite a chronic macrophage-mediated inflammatory reaction, which leads to implant failure. Macrophage activation may be polarized into two states, with an M1 proinflammatory state dominating an alternatively activated M2 anti-inflammatory state. We hypothesized that IL-4, an activator of M2 macrophages, could modulate polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in an experimental murine model. Four animal groups included (a) calvarial saline injection with harvest at 14 days (b) single calvarial injection of PE particles subcutaneously (SC) without IL-4 (c) PE particles placed as in (b), then IL-4 given SC for 14 consecutive days and (d) PE particles as in (b) then IL-4 beginning 7 days after particle injection for 7 days. The calvarial bone volume to total tissue volume was measured using microCT and histomorphometry. Calvaria were cultured for 24 h to assess release of RANKL, OPG, TNF-?, and IL-1ra and isolation and identification of M1 and M2 specific proteins. MicroCT and histomorphometric analysis showed that bone loss was significantly decreased following IL-4 administration to PE treated calvaria for both 7 and 14 days. Western blot analysis showed an increased M1/M2 ratio in the PE treated calvaria, which decreased with addition of IL-4. Cytokine analysis showed that the RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-?/IL-1ra ratio decreased in PE-treated calvaria following IL-4 addition for 14 days. IL-4 delivery mitigated PE particle-induced osteolysis through macrophage polarization. Modulation of macrophage polarization is a potential treatment strategy for wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.