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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quality of life and brain tumors: what beyond the clinical burden?
J. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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This study analyzed the subjective facets of quality of life (QoL) and their relation to the type of brain tumor (BT) and phase of disease. Two hundred and ninety-one patients with pinealoblastoma, medulloblastoma, low-grade glioma, anaplastic astrocytoma, or glioblastoma were evaluated. With respect to 110 healthy controls, patients in the phases of radiotherapy/chemotherapy, stable disease, or tumor recurrence were significantly more anxious and depressed compared with patients in the early postoperative period. All patients were impaired in mental flexibility and memory, with preservation of abstract reasoning. The Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC), previously validated in cancer and BT patients, yielded six subjective factors (disease perception, affective well-being, role and leisure, personal base, nausea, sharing). None of the FLIC factors were predicted by tumor type, which only related to the physical and cognitive performances and mood scores. Affective well-being, role and leisure, and sharing were predicted by the phase of disease. Personal base, including self-perception and confidence, was independent on tumor progression and treatment. To conclude, QoL encompasses different subjective aspects, which vary in relation to the phase of disease and clinical burden. However, some person-related facets appear independent on tumor progression and treatment, indicating individual resources. Knowing this may guide tailored interventions supporting QoL.
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Survival effect of first- and second-line treatments for patients with primary glioblastoma: a cohort study from a prospective registry, 1997-2010.
Neuro-oncology
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Prospective follow-up studies of large cohorts of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) are needed to assess the effectiveness of conventional treatments in clinical practice. We report GBM survival data from the Brain Cancer Register of the Fondazione Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta (INCB) in Milan, Italy, which collected longitudinal data for all consecutive patients with GBM from 1997 to 2010.
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Intradural extramedullary benign spinal lesions radiosurgery. Medium- to long-term results from a single institution experience.
Acta Neurochir (Wien)
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2013
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Surgery represents the first-choice treatment for spinal intradural tumours. On the other hand, whether it is most appropriate in the setting of recurrences, residual or multiple lesions remains an open question. Moreover, some patients are less than ideal candidates for surgery. In this study we report about our own radiosurgery experience in the treatment of benign intradural extramedullary tumours of the spine.
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Circulating T regulatory cells migration and phenotype in glioblastoma patients: an in vitro study.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary human brain tumor. The relatively high amount of T regulatory lymphocytes present in the tumor, contributes to the establishment of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Samples of peripheral blood were collected from GBM patients and healthy controls and a purified population of Treg (CD4(+)/CD25(bright)) was isolated using flow cytometric cell sorting. Treg migrating capacities toward human glioma cell line conditioned medium were evaluated through an in vitro migration test. Our data show that supernatants collected from GBM cell lines were more attractant to Treg when compared to complete standard medium. The addition of an anti-CCL2 antibody to conditioned medium decreased conditioned medium-depending Treg migration, suggesting that CCL2 (also known as Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein, MCP-1) is implicated in the process. The number of circulating CD4(+)/?L or Treg/?L was similar in GBM patients and controls. Specific Treg markers (FOXP3; CD127; Helios; GITR; CTLA4; CD95; CCR2, CCR4; CCR7) were screened in peripheral blood and no differences could be detected between the two populations. These data confirm that the tumor microenvironment is attractive to Treg, which tend to migrate toward the tumor region changing the immunological response. Though we provide evidence that CCL2 is implicated in Treg migration, other factors are needed as well to provide such effect.
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Prospective study of carmustine wafers in combination with 6-month metronomic temozolomide and radiation therapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma: preliminary results.
J. Neurosurg.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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Locoregional chemotherapy with carmustine wafers, positioned at surgery and followed by radiation therapy, has been shown to prolong survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, as has concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. A combination of carmustine wafers with the Stupp treatment regimen has only been investigated in retrospective studies.
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Multisession radiosurgery for optic nerve sheath meningiomas--an effective option: preliminary results of a single-center experience.
Neurosurgery
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2011
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Traditional treatment options for optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) include observation, surgery, and radiotherapy, but to date none of these has become the clear treatment of choice.
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Increased migration of a human glioma cell line after in vitro CyberKnife irradiation.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2011
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A human glioblastoma multiforme cell line (U87) and its derived-spheroids were irradiated either using a conventional irradiation (CIR) or a CK-like irradiation (IIR) in which the 8 Gy was delivered intermittently over a period of 40 minutes. The ability of glioma cells to migrate into a matrigel matrix was evaluated on days 1-8 from irradiation. Irradiation with CK-driven IIR significantly increased the invasion potential of U87 cells in a matrigel-based assay. In contrast to CIR, IIR was associated with increased levels of TGF-? at four days (Real time PCR), ?1-integrin at 4-5 days (real-time PCR and western blot) and no elevation in phosphorylated AKT at days 4 and 5 (western blot). Our data suggests that glioma cell invasion as well as elevations of TGF-? and ?1-integrin are associated with IIR and not CIR.
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Deep brain stimulation and frameless stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of bilateral parkinsonian tremor: target selection and case report of two patients.
Acta Neurochir (Wien)
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2011
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Considerable positive experience in functional radiosurgery has been reported since Leksells first experience in 1951, but the development of frameless radiosurgery was been limited because of the difficulty of identifying invisible functional targets. In this paper we report on two cases of bilateral parkinsonian tremor successfully treated with DBS on one side and with frameless radiosurgery on the contralateral side. We focus on the methodology developed to define the three-dimensional target coordinates for frameless radiosurgery. Two patients suffering from a disabling upper-limb parkinsonian tremor underwent frameless radiosurgical thalamotomy. To accurately identify the treatment target the CT gantry was treated as a stereotactic frame; a rototranslation between the origin of the screen and the origin of the stereotactic atlas allowed us to obtain atlas-registered 3D coordinates of each point on the CT axial brain slices. Both patients achieved complete bilateral tremor control by unilateral radiosurgery and contralateral DBS. We developed a method for determining the 3D coordinates of a known functional target to treat with frameless radiosurgery. Based on the initial experiences, frameless radiosurgery appears to be an alternative treatment for Parkinsonian upper limb tremor in the presence of increased surgical risks for DBS placement.
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Robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy, for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node or metastatic prostate cancer.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2011
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To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer.
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In vitro effects of Cyberknife-driven intermittent irradiation on glioblastoma cell lines.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2011
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Radiosurgery is used increasingly upon recurrence of high-grade gliomas to deliver a high dose of focused radiation to a defined target. The purpose of our study was to compare intermittent irradiation (IIR) by using a CyberKnife (CK) with continuous irradiation (CIR) by using a conventional linear accelerator (LINAC). A significant decrease in surviving fraction was observed after IIR irradiation compared with after CIR at a dose of 8 Gy. Three hours after irradiation, most of the DNA damage was repaired in U87. Slightly higher basal levels of Ku70/80 mRNA were found in U87 compared with A172, while radiation treatment induced only minor regulation of Ku70/80 and Rad51 transcription in either cell lines. IIR treatment using CK significantly decreased the survival in U87 and A172 compared with CIR. Although the two cell lines differed in DNA repair capability, the role of Ku70/80 and Rad51 in the cell line radiosensitivity seemed marginal.
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Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastases in the brain: a single-institution experience.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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The treatment of brain metastases is changing. Many different radiotherapy options are now available and under clinical evaluation. As part of this effort, we retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) in patients with up to three brain metastases. Sixty-five patients with 81 lesions were treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Median dose was 24 Gy in three fractions. Median follow-up was 24.6 months. Actuarial tumour control was 75 and 45% at 9 months and 24 months after treatment, respectively. Median survival time was 7.5 months, and 32% of the patients died from brain tumour progression. Actuarial overall survival was 75% at 3 months and 25% at 12 months. Recursive partitioning analysis class was the only significant prognostic factor. Neoadjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (in 29 patients) had no impact on survival or local control. Neurological status improved in 42 patients (65%). Adverse events were rare and usually mild. This experience suggests HSRT should be considered as an alternative approach in the treatment of one to three metastatic lesions in selected patients.
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Adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy versus observation after radiosurgery or surgical resection of one to three cerebral metastases: results of the EORTC 22952-26001 study.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2010
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This European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial assesses whether adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) increases the duration of functional independence after surgery or radiosurgery of brain metastases.
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Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects.
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Image-guided robotic radiosurgery as salvage therapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam irradiation: retrospective feasibility study on six cases.
Tumori
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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Technological advances in treatment planning and execution are providing new potential opportunities in the treatment of recurrent prostate cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and safety of reirradiation with image-guided radiosurgery using CyberKnife, a robotic arm-driven compact linear accelerator, for intraprostatic recurrence after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT).
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Survival following stereotactic radiosurgery for newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: a multicenter experience.
Neurosurg Rev
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2009
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Despite decades of clinical trials investigating new treatment modalities for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), there have been no significant treatment advances since the 1980s. Reported median survival times for patients with GBM treated with current modalities generally range from 9 to 19 months. The purpose of the current study is to retrospectively review the ability of CyberKnife (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) radiosurgery to provide local tumor control of newly diagnosed or recurrent GBM. Twenty patients (43.5%) underwent CyberKnife treatment at the time of the initial diagnosis and/or during the first 3 months of their initial clinical management. Twenty-six patients (56.5%) were treated at the time of tumor recurrence or progression. CyberKnife was performed in addition to the traditional therapy. The median survival from diagnosis for the patients treated with CyberKnife as an initial clinical therapy was 11.5 months (range, 2-33) compared to 21 months (range, 8-96) for the patients treated at the time of tumor recurrence/progression. This difference was statistically significant (Kaplan-Meier analysis, P = 0.0004). The median survival from the CyberKnife treatment was 9.5 months (range, 0.25-31 months) and 7 months (range, 1-34 months) for patients in the newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM groups (Kaplan-Meier analysis, P = 0.79), respectively. Cox proportional hazards survival regression analysis demonstrated that survival time did not correlate significantly with treatment parameters (Dmax, Dmin, number of fractions) or target volume. Survival time and recursive partitioning analysis class were not correlated (P = 0.07). Patients with more extensive surgical interventions survived longer (P = 0.008), especially those who underwent total tumor resection vs. biopsy (P = 0.004). There is no apparent survival advantage in using CyberKnife in initial management of glioblastoma patients, and it should be reserved for patients whose tumors recur or progress after conventional therapy.
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Linac-based or robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for isolated lymph node recurrent prostate cancer.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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We report on 14 patients treated with linac- or robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for isolated lymph node recurrence from prostate cancer, up to the mean dose of 30Gy/3 fractions. At the mean follow-up of 18.6months, five patients experienced clinical out-field progression. Toxicity was minimal. Further investigation is warranted in order to identify the patients that benefit most from this treatment modality and to define the optimal association of such local approach with androgen deprivation. Hopefully, effective local therapy might reduce the burden of systemic therapies given to the recurrent/metastatic prostate cancer patients.
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Paragangliomas of head and neck: a treatment option with CyberKnife radiosurgery.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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Paragangliomas are highly vascular and predominantly benign neoplasms that have traditionally been treated by surgery, embolization and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The aim of this study is to evaluate the short-term local tumor control and safety of CyberKnife radiosurgery for these lesions. Nine patients, eight with jugular glomus paragangliomas and one with a carotid body paraganglioma, were treated. The target contouring was performed on merged CT and MR images. Eight patients were treated with doses ranging from 11 to 13 Gy (mean 12.5 Gy) in a single fraction and one with 24 Gy in three fractions prescribed to 72-83% isodose line. The mean follow-up was 20 months. One patient died from unrelated causes. There were no local recurrences. All eight patients also demonstrated neurological stability or improvement. Neither cranial nerve palsies have arisen, nor has deterioration beyond baseline been observed. In conclusion, CyberKnife radiosurgery appears to be both safe and effective in the treatment of skull base paragangliomas. Determining whether long-term complications will arise will require further investigation.
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CyberKnife radiosurgery as a first treatment for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.
Neurosurgery
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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To report the level of effectiveness and safety, in our experience, of CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) robotic radiosurgery as a first-line treatment against pharmacologically refractory trigeminal neuralgia.
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Cisplatinum and BCNU chemotherapy in primary glioblastoma patients.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2009
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The prognosis of patients with glioblastoma is very poor with a mean survival of 10-12 months. Currently available treatment options are multimodal, which include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, these have been shown to improve survival only marginally in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Methylated methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is correlated with improved progression-free and overall survival in patients treated with alkylating agents. Strategies to overcome MGMT-mediated chemoresistance are being actively investigated.
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Radiotherapy and temozolomide in anaplastic astrocytoma: a retrospective multicenter study by the Central Nervous System Study Group of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology).
Neuro-oncology
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Although the evidence for the benefit of adding temozolomide (TMZ) to radiotherapy (RT) is limited to glioblastoma patients, there is currently a trend toward treating anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) with combined RT + TMZ. The aim of the present study was to describe the patterns of care of patients affected by AA and, particularly, to compare the outcome of patients treated exclusively with RT with those treated with RT + TMZ. Data of 295 newly diagnosed AAs treated with postoperative RT ± TMZ in the period from 2002 to 2007 were reviewed. More than 75% of patients underwent a surgical removal. All the patients had postoperative RT; 86.1% of them were treated with 3D-conformal RT (3D-CRT). Sixty-seven percent of the entire group received postoperative chemotherapy with TMZ (n = 198). One-hundred sixty-six patients received both concomitant and sequential TMZ. Prescription of postoperative TMZ increased in the most recent period (2005-2007). One- and 4-year survival rates were 70.2% and 28.6%, respectively. No statistically significant improvement in survival was observed with the addition of TMZ to RT (P = .59). Multivariate analysis showed the statistical significance of age, presence of seizures, Recursive Partitioning Analysis classes I-III, extent of surgical removal, and 3D-CRT. Changes in the care of AA over the past years are documented. Currently there is not evidence to justify the addition of TMZ to postoperative RT for patients with newly diagnosed AA outside a clinical trial. Results of prospective and randomized trials are needed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.