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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
WAIS-IV Reliable Digit Span is no More Accurate Than Age Corrected Scaled Score as an Indicator of Invalid Performance in a Veteran Sample Undergoing Evaluation for mTBI.
Clin Neuropsychol
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2013
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Reliable Digit Span (RDS) is a measure of effort derived from the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler intelligence scales. Some authors have suggested that the age-corrected scaled score provides a more accurate measure of effort than RDS. This study examined the relative diagnostic accuracy of the traditional RDS, an extended RDS including the new Sequencing task from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV, and the age-corrected scaled score, relative to performance validity as determined by the Test of Memory Malingering. Data were collected from 138 Veterans seen in a traumatic brain injury clinic. The traditional RDS (? 7), revised RDS (? 11), and Digit Span age-corrected scaled score (? 6) had respective sensitivities of 39%, 39%, and 33%, and respective specificities of 82%, 89%, and 91%. Of these indices, revised RDS and the Digit Span age-corrected scaled score provide the most accurate measure of performance validity among the three measures.
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Predictors of inpatient and outpatient healthcare utilization in veterans with traumatic brain injury.
J Head Trauma Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2013
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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can place a significant financial and resource burden on healthcare systems. This study examined predictors of outpatient and inpatient healthcare utilization in veterans with a history of TBI.
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Predictors of perceived need for medical care in an inpatient rehabilitation unit: an update.
J Clin Psychol Med Settings
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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Limited awareness of illness, or poor insight, has been associated with poor treatment outcomes and prognoses in both psychiatric and medical populations. We examined predictors of insight in a sample of 403 patients in an inpatient rehabilitation unit at a Midwest Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A multiple regression analysis revealed that age, depression, IQ, and a measure of judgment were significant predictors of acknowledgement of illness. Younger age, higher IQ, better judgment, and depression were associated with better insight. By identifying risk factors for poor insight, these findings have significant clinical implications for healthcare providers.
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Self-reported cognitive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury are poorly associated with neuropsychological performance in OIF/OEF veterans.
J Rehabil Res Dev
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2010
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Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is not uncommon among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) veterans, and many individuals within this group report lingering cognitive difficulties following their injury. For Department of Veterans Affairs clinicians, an accurate assessment of cognitive symptoms is important in providing appropriate clinical care. Although self-assessment is commonly employed to screen for difficulties in cognitive functioning, little is known about the accuracy of self-report in this population. This study collected cognitive, psychiatric, and self-report data from 105 OIF/OEF veterans with mTBI to examine the relationship between self-reported cognitive functioning and objective neuropsychological test performance. Additionally, clinicians who frequently work with OIF/OEF veterans were asked to predict the magnitude of these associations. Self-reported cognitive functioning was not significantly correlated with objective cognitive abilities, suggesting that objective neuropsychological testing should be used when cognitive weakness is suspected. Perceived cognitive deficits were associated with depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder, illustrating the additional importance of adequate assessment and treatment of psychiatric symptoms. Clinicians tended to overestimate the association between self-report and test performance.
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Cognitive functioning, retirement status, and age: results from the Cognitive Changes and Retirement among Senior Surgeons study.
J. Am. Coll. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2010
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Accurate assessment of cognitive functioning is an important step in understanding how to better evaluate both clinical and cognitive competence in practicing surgeons. As part of the Cognitive Changes and Retirement among Senior Surgeons study, we examined the objective cognitive functioning of senior surgeons in relation to retirement status and age.
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Contemporary review 2009: cognitive aging.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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This article addresses key topics in cognitive aging, intending to provide the reader with a brief overview of the current state of research in this growing, multidisciplinary field. A summary of the physiological changes in the aging brain is provided as well as a review of variables that influence cognitive abilities in older age. Normal aging differentially affects various aspects of cognition, and specific changes within various domains such as attention, executive functioning, and memory are discussed. Various theories have been proposed to account for the cognitive changes that accompany normal aging, and a brief examination of these theories is presented in the context of these domain-specific changes.
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Results from the cognitive changes and retirement among senior surgeons self-report survey.
J. Am. Coll. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2009
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The Cognitive Changes and Retirement among Senior Surgeons (CCRASS) study suggested that although subjective cognitive awareness may play a role in surgeons retirement decisions, self-perceived cognitive decline did not predict objective cognitive performance. This article summarizes results from all participants who completed the survey portion of the CCRASS study.
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Source memory and frontal functioning in Parkinsons disease.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2009
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The most extensively described pathological abnormality in Parkinsons disease (PD) is loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area, with degeneration of their striatal terminals. Because of the intimate connections between the striatum and the frontal lobes, individuals with PD often demonstrate impairments on those tasks relying on the prefrontal cortex (e.g., tests of executive functioning). Source memory, or memory for context, is believed to rely on the prefrontal cortex and has been previously associated with executive functioning performance, although it has received little attention in the PD literature. Executive functioning and source memory were measured in a group of nondemented PD patients and healthy control participants. Within the PD group, an anti-Parkinsons medication withdrawal manipulation was used to examine whether source memory was affected by phasic changes in dopamine levels. Compared to healthy control participants, PD patients were impaired in source memory (both on- and off-medication) and on a composite measure of executive functioning. Within the PD group, medication administration improved motor performance but did not have a significant effect on source memory.
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The influence of sleep and mood on cognitive functioning among veterans being evaluated for mild traumatic brain injury.
Mil Med
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Veterans undergoing evaluation for mild traumatic brain injury commonly report insomnia, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive dysfunction. This study examines the effects of self-reported amount of sleep and subjective sleep quality on neuropsychological test performance.
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The contributions of self-reported injury characteristics and psychiatric symptoms to cognitive functioning in OEF/OIF veterans with mild traumatic brain injury.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc
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Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) affects a significant number of combat veterans returning from Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF). Although resolution of mTBI symptoms is expected over time, some individuals continue to report lingering cognitive difficulties. This study examined the contributions of self-reported mTBI injury characteristics (e.g., loss of consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia) and psychiatric symptoms to both subjective and objective cognitive functioning in a sample of 167 OEF/OIF veterans seen in a TBI clinic. Injury characteristics were not associated with performance on neuropsychological tests but were variably related to subjective ratings of cognitive functioning. Psychiatric symptoms were highly prevalent and fully mediated most of the relationships between injury characteristics and cognitive ratings. This indicates that mTBI characteristics such as longer time since injury and loss of consciousness or post-traumatic amnesia can lead to increased perceived cognitive deficits despite having no objective effects on cognitive performance. Psychiatric symptoms were associated with both cognitive ratings and neuropsychological performance, illustrating the important role that psychiatric treatment can potentially play in optimizing functioning. Finally, subjective cognitive ratings were not predictive of neuropsychological performance once psychiatric functioning was statistically controlled, suggesting that neuropsychological assessment provides valuable information that cannot be gleaned from self-report alone.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.