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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Analyzing temozolomide medication errors: potentially fatal.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2014
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The EORTC-NCIC regimen for glioblastoma requires different dosing of temozolomide (TMZ) during radiation and maintenance therapy. This complexity is exacerbated by the availability of multiple TMZ capsule strengths. TMZ is an alkylating agent and the major toxicity of this class is dose-related myelosuppression. Inadvertent overdose can be fatal. The websites of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MedWatch database were reviewed. We searched the MedWatch database for adverse events associated with TMZ and obtained all reports including hematologic toxicity submitted from 1st November 1997 to 30th May 2012. The ISMP describes errors with TMZ resulting from the positioning of information on the label of the commercial product. The strength and quantity of capsules on the label were in close proximity to each other, and this has been changed by the manufacturer. MedWatch identified 45 medication errors. Patient errors were the most common, accounting for 21 or 47% of errors, followed by dispensing errors, which accounted for 13 or 29%. Seven reports or 16% were errors in the prescribing of TMZ. Reported outcomes ranged from reversible hematological adverse events (13%), to hospitalization for other adverse events (13%) or death (18%). Four error reports lacked detail and could not be categorized. Although the FDA issued a warning in 2003 regarding fatal medication errors and the product label warns of overdosing, errors in TMZ dosing occur for various reasons and involve both healthcare professionals and patients. Overdosing errors can be fatal.
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Bevacizumab and central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Bevacizumab is widely used and may cause life-threatening bleeding. We attempted to identify clinical characteristics associated with central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage in a broad population.
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Going past the data for temozolomide.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2011
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The benefit of six cycles of adjuvant temozolomide was documented in a randomized phase III (EORTC-NCIC CE.3) trial, and this therapy, following combined temozolomide and radiation, is the standard of care for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. We comment on the differences in the length of adjuvant therapy in both clinical practice and national studies (e.g. RTOG 0825), usually doubling the length in the EORTC/NCIC study, and relate to historic adjuvant trials for solid tumors.
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Hematologic adverse events associated with temozolomide.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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Temozolomide (TMZ) is a widely used oral alkylating agent that has been associated with the development of severe hematologic adverse events (HAEs). Limited clinical information about HAEs is available.
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Descriptive epidemiology of selected olfactory tumors.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2010
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Olfactory tumors, especially olfactory neuroblastomas (ON) and carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation (CND), are extremely rare, and little descriptive epidemiologic information is available. The objective of this study was to more fully describe selected olfactory tumors using a large population-based cancer incidence database. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 9 registries limited-use data were reviewed from 1973 to 2006 for selected nasal cavity (C30.0) and accessory sinus (C31.0-31.9) tumors. Frequencies, incidence rates, and relative survival rates were estimated using SEER*Stat, v6.5.2. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), while the incidence of ON was greater than CND. For ON, the incidence was highest in the 60-79 year age group, while for SCC, the incidence was highest in the 80+ year age group. For CND, the incidence leveled off in the oldest age groups. Survival rates were highest for ON (>70% alive at 5 years after diagnosis) and poorest for CND (44% alive at 5 years). Adjuvant radiation therapy did not improve survival over surgery alone in ON. In SCC, survival was worse in patients who received adjuvant radiation compared to patients who had surgery alone. Our analysis confirms some previously published information, and adds new information about the incidence and demographics of ON and CND. In addition, our analysis documents the lack of benefit of adjuvant radiation in ON. It is not feasible to conduct prospective trials in patients with these rare diseases, and the importance of registry data in learning about olfactory tumors is emphasized.
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Understanding and managing the possible adverse effects associated with bevacizumab.
Am J Health Syst Pharm
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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The adverse events associated with bevacizumab therapy are characterized, and the underlying pathophysiology, risk factors, frequency, and management of these events are described.
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Temozolomide in malignant gliomas: current use and future targets.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2009
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Temozolomide (TMZ) is an oral alkylating agent that is regarded as a tolerable and effective drug. When combined with radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, survival is significantly prolonged. This finding has led to widespread use of TMZ for patients with this disease. We summarize developing concerns regarding the use of TMZ, imaging of malignant gliomas, and the pharmacology of TMZ-mechanism of action, scheduling and strategies for overcoming resistance.
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Evaluation of the Modified Diet in Renal Disease equation for calculation of carboplatin dose.
Ann Pharmacother
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2009
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Serum creatinine (SCr)-based formulas are used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) when calculating a dosage for carboplatin using the Calvert equation, but these formulas often underestimate measured GFR. The Modified Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation appears to be a more accurate estimate of GFR in patients with chronic kidney disease, but this equation has not been studied extensively in patients with cancer.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.