JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Comorbidity among multiple pain symptoms and anxious depression in a Dutch population sample.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Most studies on pain focus on specific disorders, which makes it difficult to compare characteristics across different types of pain symptoms. In this large population-based study, we examine the prevalence and comorbidity patterns among pain symptoms across a wide range of anatomic sites (back, neck, head, abdomen, joints, chest, face, teeth, and "other") in relation to anxious depression and a range of demographic, health, and lifestyle variables. Self-report data were collected in 11,787 adult participants of The Netherlands Twin Registry (mean age 44.5 years, 62% female), including twins and relatives of twins. Headache and abdominal pain were strongly associated with female sex, whereas chest pain and toothache were not. Joint pain strongly increased with age, whereas headache and abdominal pain decreased with age. Most other pain sites were only weakly associated with age. A highly consistent pattern of comorbidity was observed: All pain symptoms were correlated with all other pain symptoms, as well as with anxious depression. Frequent and widespread pain (ie, pain at multiple sites) was most strongly associated with anxious depression. These observations reflect important differences between specific pain symptoms, suggesting partly separate etiologies, but also highlight the importance of shared mechanisms underlying pain symptoms in general.
Related JoVE Video
Explaining individual differences in alcohol intake in adults: evidence for genetic and cultural transmission?
J Stud Alcohol Drugs
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The current study aimed to describe what proportion of variation in adult alcohol intake is attributable to genetic differences among individuals and what proportion to differences in environmental experiences individuals have been exposed to. Effects of age, gender, spousal resemblance, and cultural transmission of alcohol intake from parents to offspring were taken into account.
Related JoVE Video
Smoking During Adolescence as a Risk Factor for Attention Problems.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cigarette smoking and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are highly comorbid. One explanation is that individuals with ADHD use cigarettes as "self-medication" to alleviate their attention problems. However, animal studies reported that exposure to nicotine during adolescence influences the developing brain and negatively affects attention. This is the first human study exploring the effects of smoking during adolescence on attention problems.
Related JoVE Video
Developmental prediction model for early alcohol initiation in Dutch adolescents.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Multiple factors predict early alcohol initiation in teenagers. Among these are genetic risk factors, childhood behavioral problems, life events, lifestyle, and family environment. We constructed a developmental prediction model for alcohol initiation below the Dutch legal drinking age (16 years), elaborating on the pathways identified by earlier studies.
Related JoVE Video
The association of alcohol intake with gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels: Evidence for correlated genetic effects.
Drug Alcohol Depend
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Blood levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) are used as a marker for (heavy) alcohol use. The role of GGT in the anti-oxidant defense mechanism that is part of normal metabolism supposes a causal effect of alcohol intake on GGT. However, there is variability in the response of GGT to alcohol use, which may result from genetic differences between individuals. This study aimed to determine whether the epidemiological association between alcohol intake and GGT at the population level is necessarily a causal one or may also reflect effects of genetic pleiotropy (genes influencing multiple traits).
Related JoVE Video
Increases in alcohol consumption in women and elderly groups: evidence from an epidemiological study.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
BACKGROUND: In most Western countries, alcohol consumption continues to increase, specifically among women and older adults. Insight into these trends may aid intervention strategies. Here we present data on alcohol consumption by age and sex as well as associations between alcohol use and demographic lifestyle/traits. The data are from a large (N>16,000) population-based Dutch sample, ascertained based on the presence of twins in the family. METHODS: A set of 16 indicators of normative and problematic alcohol use was assessed in participants of the Netherlands Twin Register between 2009--2012 (ages 18--97; 6,052 men; 10,535 women). Alcohol consumption and demographic/lifestyle traits, including educational attainment, work-related/financial stress, urbanization, religiousness, smoking/cannabis initiation, and BMI were described by age and sex. Associations were examined by regressing aspects of alcohol use on age, sex, their interaction, and demographic/lifestyle variables. RESULTS: Age, sex, and initiation of cigarette and cannabis use were the most important predictors of alcohol use. Frequency of alcohol use was lowest between 18--25 years, with 3.2% of men and .6% of women drinking 6--7 times/week, and highest above age 65 years, with 30.6-32.7% of men and 20.2-22.0% of women drinking 6--7 times/week. Women consumed the lowest quantities of alcohol between 25--45 years, with a 5.7-5.9% prevalence of excessive drinking (>14 glasses/week), and the largest quantities between 55--65 years (15.5% excessive drinkers). Age at alcohol initiation, onset of regular drinking, and first alcohol intoxication were lowest between ages 18--25 years and highest above age 65 years. Among older participants, men initiated alcohol use and regular drinking earlier, and had lower age at first intoxication than women, but among young adults, no sex differences were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption was high in the elderly Dutch population, especially among women. Alcohol initiation, onset of regular drinking, and first alcohol intoxication occur at increasingly younger ages, and the previous gap between men and women in age at alcohol initiation, onset of regular drinking, and first alcohol intoxication has closed almost entirely. Heavy alcohol use was most strongly predicted by older age, sex (male), and initiation of smoking and cannabis use.
Related JoVE Video
The Adult Netherlands Twin Register: twenty-five years of survey and biological data collection.
Twin Res Hum Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Over the past 25 years, the Adult Netherlands Twin Register (ANTR) has collected a wealth of information on physical and mental health, lifestyle, and personality in adolescents and adults. This article provides an overview of the sources of information available, the main research findings, and an outlook for the future. Between 1991 and 2012, longitudinal surveys were completed by twins, their parents, siblings, spouses, and offspring. Data are available for 33,957 participants, with most individuals having completed two or more surveys. Smaller projects provided in-depth phenotyping, including measurements of the autonomic nervous system, neurocognitive function, and brain imaging. For 46% of the ANTR participants, DNA samples are available and whole genome scans have been obtained in more than 11,000 individuals. These data have resulted in numerous studies on heritability, gene x environment interactions, and causality, as well as gene finding studies. In the future, these studies will continue with collection of additional phenotypes, such as metabolomic and telomere length data, and detailed genetic information provided by DNA and RNA sequencing. Record linkage to national registers will allow the study of morbidity and mortality, thus providing insight into the development of health, lifestyle, and behavior across the lifespan.
Related JoVE Video
Trends in adolescent alcohol use: effects of age, sex and cohort on prevalence and heritability.
Addiction
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To determine the effect of age, sex and cohort on the prevalence and genetic architecture of adolescent alcohol use (AAU).
Related JoVE Video
Heritability of problem drinking and the genetic overlap with personality in a general population sample.
Front Genet
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study examined the heritability of problem drinking and investigated the phenotypic and genetic relationships between problem drinking and personality. In a sample of 5,870 twins and siblings and 4,420 additional family members from the Netherlands Twin Register. Data on problem drinking (assessed with the AUDIT and CAGE; 12 items) and personality [NEO Five-Factor Inventory (FFI); 60 items] were collected in 2009/2010 by surveys. Confirmatory factor analysis on the AUDIT and CAGE items showed that the items clustered on two separate but highly correlated (r?=?0.74) underlying factors. A higher-order factor was extracted that reflected those aspects of problem drinking that are common to the AUDIT and CAGE, which showed a heritability of 40%. The correlations between problem drinking and the five dimensions of personality were small but significant, ranging from 0.06 for Extraversion to -0.12 for Conscientiousness. All personality dimensions (with broad-sense heritabilities between 32 and 55%, and some evidence for non-additive genetic influences) were genetically correlated with problem drinking. The genetic correlations were small to modest (between |0.12| and |0.41|). Future studies with longitudinal data and DNA polymorphisms are needed to determine the biological mechanisms that underlie the genetic link between problem drinking and personality.
Related JoVE Video
Thought problems from adolescence to adulthood: measurement invariance and longitudinal heritability.
Behav. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study investigates the longitudinal heritability in Thought Problems (TP) as measured with ten items from the Adult Self Report (ASR). There were ~9,000 twins, ~2,000 siblings and ~3,000 additional family members who participated in the study and who are registered at the Netherlands Twin Register. First an exploratory factor analysis was conducted to examine the underlying factor structure of the TP-scale. Then the TP-scale was tested for measurement invariance (MI) across age and sex. Next, genetic and environmental influences were modeled on the longitudinal development of TP across three age groups (12-18, 19-27 and 28-59 year olds) based on the twin and sibling relationships in the data. An exploratory factor analysis yielded a one-factor solution, and MI analyses indicated that the same TP-construct is assessed across age and sex. Two additive genetic components influenced TP across age: the first influencing TP throughout all age groups, while the second arises during young adulthood and stays significant throughout adulthood. The additive genetic components explained 37% of the variation across all age groups. The remaining variance (63%) was explained by unique environmental influences. The longitudinal phenotypic correlation between these age groups was entirely explained by the additive genetic components. We conclude that the TP-scale measures a single underlying construct across sex and different ages. These symptoms are significantly influenced by additive genetic factors from adolescence to late adulthood.
Related JoVE Video
Stable genetic effects on symptoms of alcohol abuse and dependence from adolescence into early adulthood.
Behav. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Relatively little is known about how genetic influences on alcohol abuse and dependence (AAD) change with age. We examined the change in influence of genetic and environmental factors which explain symptoms of AAD from adolescence into early adulthood. Symptoms of AAD were assessed using the four AAD screening questions of the CAGE inventory. Data were obtained up to six times by self-report questionnaires for 8,398 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register aged between 15 and 32 years. Longitudinal genetic simplex modeling was performed with Mx. Results showed that shared environmental influences were present for age 15-17 (57%) and age 18-20 (18%). Unique environmental influences gained importance over time, contributing 15% of the variance at age 15-17 and 48% at age 30-32. At younger ages, unique environmental influences were largely age-specific, while at later ages, age-specific influences became less important. Genetic influences on AAD symptoms over age could be accounted for by one factor, with the relative influence of this factor differing across ages. Genetic influences increased from 28% at age 15-17 to 58% at age 21-23 and remained high in magnitude thereafter. These results are in line with a developmentally stable hypothesis that predicts that a single set of genetic risk factors acts on symptoms of AAD from adolescence into young adulthood.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic epidemiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD index) in adults.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In contrast to the large number of studies in children, there is little information on the contribution of genetic factors to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in adults.
Related JoVE Video
Oral health-related quality of life and dental esthetics in Amsterdam schoolchildren.
J Dent Child (Chic)
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of schoolchildren in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and to assess the relationship between OHRQoL and self-reported dental esthetics.
Related JoVE Video
Borderline personality traits and substance use: genetic factors underlie the association with smoking and ever use of cannabis, but not with high alcohol consumption.
J. Pers. Disord.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and substance use disorders often co-occur. Both disorders are heritable and family studies showed that there are familial factors that increase the risk for BPD as well as substance use/abuse. This is the first study that investigates whether the association of borderline personality traits (BPT) with substance use reflects an underlying genetic vulnerability or nongenetic familial influences. To this end we analyzed data of 5,638 Dutch and Belgian twins aged between 21-50 years from 3,567 families. Significant associations between BPT and high alcohol consumption (r = .192), regular smoking (r = .299), and ever use of cannabis (r = .254) were found. Bivariate genetic analyses showed that the associations of BPT and substance use had different etiologies. For regular smoking and for ever use of cannabis, the correlation with BPT was explained by common genetic factors. Interestingly, for high alcohol consumption and BPT the association was explained by unique environmental factors that influence both traits rather than common genetic factors.
Related JoVE Video
Sex differences in genetic architecture of complex phenotypes?
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We examined sex differences in familial resemblance for a broad range of behavioral, psychiatric and health related phenotypes (122 complex traits) in children and adults. There is a renewed interest in the importance of genotype by sex interaction in, for example, genome-wide association (GWA) studies of complex phenotypes. If different genes play a role across sex, GWA studies should consider the effect of genetic variants separately in men and women, which affects statistical power. Twin and family studies offer an opportunity to compare resemblance between opposite-sex family members to the resemblance between same-sex relatives, thereby presenting a test of quantitative and qualitative sex differences in the genetic architecture of complex traits. We analyzed data on lifestyle, personality, psychiatric disorder, health, growth, development and metabolic traits in dizygotic (DZ) same-sex and opposite-sex twins, as these siblings are perfectly matched for age and prenatal exposures. Sample size varied from slightly over 300 subjects for measures of brain function such as EEG power to over 30,000 subjects for childhood psychopathology and birth weight. For most phenotypes, sample sizes were large, with an average sample size of 9027 individuals. By testing whether the resemblance in DZ opposite-sex pairs is the same as in DZ same-sex pairs, we obtain evidence for genetic qualitative sex-differences in the genetic architecture of complex traits for 4% of phenotypes. We conclude that for most traits that were examined, the current evidence is that same the genes are operating in men and women.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.