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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The G protein-coupled receptor GPR162 is widely distributed in the CNS and highly expressed in the hypothalamus and in hedonic feeding areas.
Gene
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2014
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The Rhodopsin family is a class of integral membrane proteins belonging to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To date, several orphan GPCRs are still uncharacterized and in this study we present an anatomical characterization of the GPR162 protein and an attempt to describe its functional role. Our results show that GPR162 is widely expressed in GABAergic as well as other neurons within the mouse hippocampus, whereas extensive expression is observed in areas related to energy homeostasis and hedonic feeding such as hypothalamus, amygdala and ventral tegmental area, regions known to be involved in the regulation of palatable food consumption.
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Can leptin-derived sequence-modified nanoparticles be suitable tools for brain delivery?
Nanomedicine (Lond)
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2011
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In order to increase the knowledge on the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in brain targeting, this article describes the conjugation of the sequence 12-32 (g21) of leptin to poly-lactide-co-glycolide NPs. The capability of these modified NPs to reach the brain was evaluated in rats after intravenous administration.
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Investigation on mechanisms of glycopeptide nanoparticles for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.
Nanomedicine (Lond)
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Nanoneuroscience, based on the use polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), represents an emerging field of research for achieving an effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) glyco-heptapetide-conjugated NPs (g7-NPs) were shown to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the in vivo mechanisms of the BBB crossing of this kind of NP has not been investigated until now. This article aimed to develop a deep understanding of the mechanism of BBB crossing of the modified NPs.
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Adhesion GPCRs are widely expressed throughout the subsections of the gastrointestinal tract.
BMC Gastroenterol
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G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest families of transmembrane receptors and the most common drug target. The Adhesion subfamily is the second largest one of GPCRs and its several members are known to mediate neural development and immune system functioning through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The distribution of these receptors has not been characterized in detail in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we present the first comprehensive anatomical profiling of mRNA expression of all 30 Adhesion GPCRs in the rat GI tract divided into twelve subsegments.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.