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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Risk of developing diabetes and dyslipidemia among adolescents with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.
Int J Adolesc Med Health
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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The risks of developing diabetes and dyslipidemia among adolescents with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have not been well-characterized. This study was designed to characterize these risks and compare them among adolescents in the general population. Methods: This retrospective cohort study used claims data from a large U.S. health insurer to identify adolescents (13-17 years) with claims for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from 1997 to 2006. Adolescents without evidence of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder were randomly selected for comparison. Study outcomes were new diagnoses of diabetes and dyslipidemia. Results: We identified 17,884 adolescents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 188,059 for the general population cohort. The incidence rate per 100,000 person-years of diabetes was higher in the schizophrenia or bipolar disorder cohort [424.3 (95% CI: 344.5-517.3)] than in the general population cohort (90.0 [95% CI: 79.6-101.3]). The incidence rate per 100,000 person-years of dyslipidemia was 346.4 (95% CI: 274.9-431.0) in the schizophrenia or bipolar disorder cohort and 86.6 (95% CI: 76.4-97.7) in the general population cohort. The adjusted hazard ratios of developing diabetes and dyslipidemia in the schizophrenia or bipolar disorder cohort relative to the general population cohort were 1.76 (95% CI: 1.15-2.72) and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.22-2.28), respectively. Adolescents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder treated with antipsychotics had a higher risk of developing diabetes and dyslipidemia than those who were untreated. Conclusions: Adolescents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder had significantly increased risks of developing diabetes and dyslipidemia compared to adolescents without these disorders.
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A multicenter, inpatient, phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose-ranging study of LY2140023 monohydrate in patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia.
J Clin Psychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2011
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The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that 1 or more dose levels of LY2140023 monohydrate, an oral prodrug of the potent metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptor agonist LY404039, given to patients with schizophrenia for 4 weeks would demonstrate significantly greater efficacy than placebo. The HBBI study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo- and active-controlled trial. Male and female patients aged 18 to 65 years who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for schizophrenia were randomized in a 2:2:2:2:2:1 ratio to receive 5-, 20-, 40-, or 80-mg LY2140023 monohydrate twice daily, placebo twice daily, or placebo (am) and 15 mg of olanzapine (pm) daily. Efficacy was defined as the change from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score assessed at 4 weeks. The primary analysis did not show that any of the 4 LY2140023 monohydrate doses were more efficacious than placebo as measured by the PANSS total score. Similarly, olanzapine did not significantly separate from placebo. A higher-than-anticipated treatment effect (14.6-point improvement) in the placebo group was observed on PANSS total score. LY2140023 monohydrate was generally well tolerated, although 4 patients reported the serious adverse event of convulsion. LY2140023 monohydrate-treated patients showed little change in dopamine-related adverse events and weight. The results of the HBBI study are considered to be inconclusive because LY2140023 monohydrate and the active control olanzapine did not separate from placebo in the treatment of patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia. Additional efficacy, safety, and tolerability testing are needed.
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A dose comparison of olanzapine for the treatment of borderline personality disorder: a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
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To examine the efficacy and safety of olanzapine at low and moderate doses for the treatment of borderline personality disorder.
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Comparison of metabolic changes in patients with schizophrenia during randomized treatment with intramuscular olanzapine long-acting injection versus oral olanzapine.
Hum Psychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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Metabolic changes were examined in patients with schizophrenia during treatment with either oral olanzapine or olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI). Data were collected from patients who had been stabilized on oral olanzapine (10, 15, or 20 mg/day) for ?4 weeks and then randomized to either continued olanzapine oral treatment (n = 322) or LAI (n = 599; 150 mg/2 weeks, 405 mg/4 weeks, or 300 mg/2 weeks) for up to 24 weeks. Mean and categorical changes in metabolic parameters were analyzed. Mean changes in weight, glucose, and most lipids were generally not significantly different between treatment groups. Weight changes over time followed similar patterns and were not significantly different at endpoint between the two treatment-formulation groups. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly less among olanzapine LAI-treated patients. Percentages of patients with potentially clinically significant changes in blood glucose and lipid concentrations were similar for the two treatments. Percentages of patients experiencing adverse events related to weight, diabetes, or dyslipidemia were also not significantly different between treatments. Metabolic changes in patients with schizophrenia appeared generally similar during treatment with oral olanzapine or olanzapine LAI.
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A 28-week, randomized, double-blind study of olanzapine versus aripiprazole in the treatment of schizophrenia.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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To evaluate the effectiveness of olanzapine versus aripiprazole in patients with schizophrenia.
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The safety of olanzapine in adolescents with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder: a pooled analysis of 4 clinical trials.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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To describe the safety of olanzapine treatment in adolescents (aged 13-17 years) with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder, and to compare these data with those of olanzapine-treated adults.
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Early predictors of weight gain risk during treatment with olanzapine: analysis of pooled data from 58 clinical trials.
Psychopharmacol Bull
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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This analysis evaluated the usefulness of different predictors in identifying patient risk of substantial weight gain (SWG) during olanzapine treatment. Data were from 58 studies with 3826 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, or borderline personality disorder. The primary definition for SWG was gaining >/=12% of baseline weight by endpoint (30 weeks +/-5 weeks); other definitions of SWG were also examined. Potential predictors of SWG included baseline patient characteristics, weight change, and percent weight change at Weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4 after olanzapine initiation. To facilitate model building and validation, the data set was randomly partitioned into training (N = 1912), validation (N = 1149), and test (N = 765) sets and 2 complementary analytic techniques were used: logistic regression with stepwise variable selection followed by receiver operating characteristic analysis for evaluation of resulting candidate models and decision trees. Approximately 24% of patients gained >/=12% of their initial weight, about 30% gained >/=10%, and 45% gained >/=7% or >/=5 kg by the 30-week endpoint. Baseline covariates significantly and positively associated with probability of SWG were lower baseline body mass index, younger age, female sex, United States residency, and African ethnicity. Early weight changes substantially improved the prediction of the risk for longer-term SWG. These results confirm that cut-offs for weight gain during the first 4 weeks of treatment may be useful in evaluating SWG risk for an individual patient.
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Adverse events in healthy subjects exposed to single and multiple doses of LY2140023 monohydrate: pooled results from 10 phase 1 studies.
J Clin Psychopharmacol
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Ten phase 1 studies of LY2140023 monohydrate (LY2140023), an mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, in healthy male and female subjects were pooled to evaluate the adverse event profile. These studies included both single-dose (5-200 mg) and multiple-dose (20-160 mg 2 times a day) treatment groups. The percentage of subjects reporting treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were assessed in placebo and LY2140023 dose groups: 5 to 20, 40, 60 to 80, and more than 80 mg (120-200 mg). The severity and duration of TEAEs were also determined. Electroencephalograms were performed in 1 study to detect if there were any prodromal signs of convulsions or seizures. Subjects who received either placebo or LY2140023 and participated in the single-dose (n = 159) and multiple-dose (n = 102) treatment groups were included in these analyses. No clear trends for increased TEAE incidence occurred with higher doses of LY2140023 in both the single-dose and multiple-dose treatment groups. The TEAEs with the highest incidence were gastrointestinal and nervous system events. No serious adverse events occurred in any of the 10 studies, and most TEAEs were mild in severity and transient in nature. There were no clinically significant changes in electroencephalograms in subjects receiving LY2140023 (n = 26). LY2140023 was generally well tolerated in healthy subjects.
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Comparison of long-term (at least 24 weeks) weight gain and metabolic changes between adolescents and adults treated with olanzapine.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol
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The purpose of these analyses was to compare the weight and other metabolic changes between adolescents and adults during long-term (at least 24 weeks) olanzapine treatment.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.