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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Staphylococcus aureus Manganese Transport Protein C (MntC) Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Binding Protein.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus - particularly nosocomial infections - represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM). Manganese transport protein C (MntC), a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ?-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the ? and ? chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation.
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Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.
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Immune Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira Strains: The Secretion of Proteases that Directly Cleave Complement Proteins.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2013
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Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of public health importance. To successfully colonize the host, pathogens have evolved multiple strategies to escape the complement system. Here we demonstrate that the culture supernatant of pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira inhibit the three complement pathways. We showed that the proteolytic activity in the supernatants of pathogenic strains targets the central complement molecule C3 and specific proteins from each pathway, such as factor B, C2, and C4b. The proteases cleaved ? and ? chains of C3 and work in synergy with host regulators to inactivate C3b. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting the participation of metalloproteases. A recombinant leptospiral metalloprotease from the thermolysin family cleaved C3 in serum and could be one of the proteases responsible for the supernatant activity. We conclude that pathogenic leptospiral proteases can deactivate immune effector molecules and represent potential targets to the development of new therapies in leptospirosis.
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Interaction of human complement factor H variants Tyr??² and His??² with Leptospira spp.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2011
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Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic bacteria from the genus Leptospira. The disease represents a serious public health problem in underdeveloped tropical countries. Leptospires infect hosts through small abrasions in the skin or mucous membranes and they rapidly disseminate to target organs. The capacity of some pathogenic leptospiral strains to acquire the negative complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein correlates with their ability to survive in human serum. In this study we assessed the functional consequences of the age macular degeneration-associated polymorphism FH His??² or FH Tyr??² on FH-Leptospira interactions. In binding assays using sub-saturating amounts of FH, the FH Tyr??² variant interacted with all the strains tested more strongly than the FH His??² variant. At higher concentrations, differences tended to disappear. We then compared cofactor activities displayed by FH His??² and FH Tyr??² bound to the surface of L. interrogans. Both variants exhibit similar activity as cofactors for Factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, thus indicating that they do not differ in their capacity to regulate the complement cascade.
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Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins interact with human complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, FHR-1, and C4BP.
J. Infect. Dis.
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Leptospira, the causative agent of leptospirosis, interacts with several host molecules, including extracellular matrix components, coagulation cascade proteins, and human complement regulators. Here we demonstrate that acquisition of factor H (FH) on the Leptospira surface is crucial for bacterial survival in the serum and that these spirochetes, besides interacting with FH, FH related-1, and C4b binding protein (C4BP), also acquire FH like-1 from human serum. We also demonstrate that binding to these complement regulators is mediated by leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins, previously shown to interact with fibronectin, laminin, collagen, elastin, tropoelastin, and fibrinogen. Factor H binds to Lig proteins via short consensus repeat domains 5 and 20. Competition assays suggest that FH and C4BP have distinct binding sites on Lig proteins. Moreover, FH and C4BP bound to immobilized Ligs display cofactor activity, mediating C3b and C4b degradation by factor I. In conclusion, Lig proteins are multifunctional molecules, contributing to leptospiral adhesion and immune evasion.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.