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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Adolescent life-event stress in boys is associated with elevated IL-6 and hepcidin but not hypoferremia.
J Am Coll Nutr
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The link between stress-related increases in inflammatory markers, hepcidin, and iron status are poorly understood, especially in developing countries like India. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between adolescent life-event stress (ALES), inflammatory markers, and its association with hepcidin and biomarkers of iron status among adolescent boys.
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Immunopathogenesis of HIV infection in cocaine users: role of arachidonic acid.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
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Arachidonic acid (AA) is known to be increased in HIV infected patients and illicit drug users are linked with severity of viral replication, disease progression, and impaired immune functions. Studies have shown that cocaine accelerates HIV infection and disease progression mediated by immune cells. Dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of antigen presentation and defense against immune dysfunction. However, the role of cocaine use in HIV associated acceleration of AA secretion and its metabolites on immature dendritic cells (IDC) has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of AA metabolites cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E2 synthetase (PGE2), thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R), cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPG), such as 15-deoxy-?12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), 14-3-3 ?/? and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) mediated induction of IDC immune dysfunctions in cocaine using HIV positive patients. The plasma levels of AA, PGE2, 15d-PGJ2, 14-3-3 ?/? and IDC intracellular COX-2 and 5-LOX expression were assessed in cocaine users, HIV positive patients, HIV positive cocaine users and normal subjects. Results showed that plasma concentration levels of AA, PGE2 and COX-2, TBXA2R and 5-LOX in IDCs of HIV positive cocaine users were significantly higher whereas 15d-PGJ2 and 14-3-3 ?/? were significantly reduced compared to either HIV positive subjects or cocaine users alone. This report demonstrates that AA metabolites are capable of mediating the accelerative effects of cocaine on HIV infection and disease progression.
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The potential of magneto-electric nanocarriers for drug delivery.
Expert Opin Drug Deliv
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2014
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The development and design of personalized nanomedicine for better health quality is receiving great attention. In order to deliver and release a therapeutic concentration at the target site, novel nanocarriers (NCs) were designed, for example, magneto-electric (ME) which possess ideal properties of high drug loading, site-specificity and precise on-demand controlled drug delivery.
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Alcohol abuse and HIV infection: role of DRD2.
Curr. HIV Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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According to a survey from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), approximately 53% of HIV-infected patients reported drinking alcohol and 8% were classified as heavy drinkers. The role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV infection has been widely studied and recent research has found a significant association between heavy alcohol consumption and lower levels of CD4 T cells among HIV-infected alcoholics. Although there is evidence on the role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission and disease progression, there is a need for population studies to determine the genetic mechanisms that affect alcohol's role in HIV disease progression. One of the mechanisms of interest is the dopaminergic system. To date, the effects of dopamine on HIV neuroimmune pathogenesis are not well understood; however, dopaminergic neural degeneration due to HIV is known to occur by viral invasion into the brain via immune cells, and modulation of dopamine in the CNS may be a common mechanism by which different types of substances of abuse impact HIV disease progression. Although previous studies have shown an association of D(2) dopamine receptor (DRD2) polymorphisms with severity of alcohol dependence, the expression of this allele risk on HIV patients with alcohol dependence has not been systematically explored. In the current study, DRD2 Taq1A and C957T SNP genotyping analyses were performed in 165 HIV-infected alcohol abusers and the results were examined with immune status and CD4 counts.
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Quantitative determination of melatonin in milk by LC-MS/MS.
J Food Sci Technol
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2014
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A rapid, reliable and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the determination of melatonin in milk was developed and validated. Sample was extracted with dichloromethane and cleaned by passing through Chem Elut solid phase extraction cartridge. The solvent was evaporated to dryness, reconstituted with methanol and analysed by LC-MS/MS on Agilent zorbax Eclipse XDB C-18 rapid resolution analytical column. The analytical procedure was found to be accurate, precise and linear. The method accuracy was 92.2 % (range 90.06-94.58) and the mean precision was 1.55 % and the calibration was linear for 1 to 150 pg mL(-1) (R(2)?>?0.99), the lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 1 pg mL(-1). 7-D Melatonin (7-DM) was used as an internal standard. This method was proved to be a promising method for the determination of melatonin for market milk and human milk samples.
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Integrating nutrition and early child-development interventions among infants and preschoolers in rural India.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2014
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This article describes the development, design, and implementation of an integrated randomized double-masked placebo-controlled trial (Project Grow Smart) that examines how home/preschool fortification with multiple micronutrient powder (MNP) combined with an early child-development intervention affects child development, growth, and micronutrient status among infants and preschoolers in rural India. The 1-year trial has an infant phase (enrollment age: 6-12 months) and a preschool phase (enrollment age: 36-48 months). Infants are individually randomized into one of four groups: placebo, placebo plus early learning, MNP alone, and MNP plus early learning (integrated intervention), conducted through home visits. The preschool phase is a cluster-randomized trial conducted in Anganwadi centers (AWCs), government-run preschools sponsored by the Integrated Child Development System of India. AWCs are randomized into MNP or placebo, with the MNP or placebo mixed into the children's food. The evaluation examines whether the effects of the MNP intervention vary by the quality of the early learning opportunities and communication within the AWCs. Study outcomes include child development, growth, and micronutrient status. Lessons learned during the development, design, and implementation of the integrated trial can be used to guide large-scale policy and programs designed to promote the developmental, educational, and economic potential of children in developing countries.
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Cell cycle checkpoints and pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection: a brief overview.
J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Abstract To understand HIV pathogenesis or development is no simple undertaking and neither is the cell cycle which is highly complex that requires the coordination of multiple events and machinery. It is interesting that these two processes are interrelated, intersect and interact as HIV-1 infection results in cell cycle arrest at the G2 phase which is accompanied by massive CD4+ T cell death. For its own benefit, in an impressive manner and with the overabundance of tactics, HIV maneuvers DNA damage responses and cell cycle check points for viral replication at different stages from infection, to latency and to pathogenesis. Although the cell cycle is the most critical aspect involved in both viral and cellular replication, in this review, our main focus is on recent developments, including our own observations in the field of cell cycle proteins, checkpoints and strategies utilized by the viruses to manipulate these pathways to promote their own replication and survival. We will also discuss the emerging concept of targeting the replication initiation machinery for HIV therapy.
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Electrochemical sensing of cortisol: a recent update.
Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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Psychological stress caused by everyday lifestyle contributes to health disparities experienced by individuals. It affects many biomarkers, but cortisol - "a steroid hormone" - is known as a potential biomarker for psychological stress detection. Abnormal levels of cortisol are indicative of conditions such as Cushing's syndrome Addison's disease, adrenal insufficiencies and more recently post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Chromatographic techniques, which are traditionally used to detect cortisol, are a complex system requiring multistep extraction/purification. This limits its application for point-of-care (POC) detection of cortisol. However, electrochemical immunosensing of cortisol is a recent advancement towards POC application. This review highlights simple, low-cost, and label-free electrochemical immunosensing platforms which have been developed recently for sensitive and selective detection of cortisol in bio-fluids. Electrochemical detection is utilized for the detection of cortisol using Anti-Cortisol antibodies (Anti-Cab) covalently immobilized on nanostructures, such as self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and polymer composite, for POC integration of sensors. The observed information can be used as a prototype to understand behavioral changes in humans such as farmers and firefighters. Keeping the future directions and challenges in mind, the focus of the BioMEMS and Microsystems Research Group at Florida International University is on development of POC devices for immunosensing, integration of these devices with microfluidics, cross validation with existing technologies, and analysis of real sample.
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Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.
Mol Brain
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown.
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Immunoneuropathogenesis of HIV-1 clades B and C: role of redox expression and thiol modification.
Free Radic. Biol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Previous studies have shown that, during infection, HIV-1 clade B and clade C differentially contribute to the neuropathogenesis and development of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs). The low-molecular-weight tripeptide glutathione (GSH) alters the redox balance and leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the neuropathogenesis of HANDs. We hypothesized that the HIV-1 clade B and clade C viruses and their respective Tat proteins exert differential effects on monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (IDCs) and neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-MC) by redox activation, which leads to immunoneuropathogenesis. The GSH/GSSG ratio and mRNA expression levels and protein modification of glutathione synthetase (GSS), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), and catalase (CAT) were analyzed in IDCs infected with HIV-1 clade B or clade C as well as in cells treated with the respective Tat proteins. The results indicated that HIV-1 clade B virus and its Tat protein significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species and reduced the GSH/GSSG ratio and subsequent downregulation of gene expression and protein modification of GSS, GPx1, SOD1, and CAT compared to infection with the clade C virus or treatment with the clade C Tat protein. Thus, our studies demonstrate that HIV-1 clades B and C exert differential effects of redox expression and thiol modification. HIV-1 clade B potentially induces oxidative stress, leading to more immunoneuropathogenesis than infection with HIV-1 clade C.
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Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation.
Nanotechnology
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ?10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ?130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.
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Towards nanomedicines for neuroAIDS.
Rev. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in remarkable decline in the morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients, controlling HIV infections still remain a global health priority. HIV access to the CNS serves as the natural viral preserve because most antiretroviral (ARV) drugs possess inadequate or zero delivery across the brain barriers. Thus, development of target-specific, effective, safe, and controllable drug-delivery approach is an important health priority for global elimination of AIDS progression. Emergence of nanotechnology in medicine has shown exciting prospect for development of novel drug delivery systems to administer the desired therapeutic levels of ARV drugs in the CNS. Neuron-resuscitating and/or antidependence agents may also be delivered in the brain through nanocarriers to countercheck the rate of neuronal degradation during HIV infection. Several nanovehicles such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, and solid lipid nanoparticles have been intensively explored. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles and monocytes/macrophages have also been used as carrier to improve the delivery of nanoformulated ARV drugs across the blood-brain barrier. Nevertheless, more rigorous research homework has to be elucidated to sort out the shortcomings that affect the target specificity, delivery, release, and/or bioavailability of desired amount of drugs for treatment of neuroAIDS.
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Vegetation response and landscape dynamics of Indian Summer Monsoon variations during Holocene: an eco-geomorphological appraisal of tropical evergreen forest subfossil logs.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The high rainfall and low sea level during Early Holocene had a significant impact on the development and sustenance of dense forest and swamp-marsh cover along the southwest coast of India. This heavy rainfall flooded the coastal plains, forest flourishing in the abandoned river channels and other low-lying areas in midland.The coastline and other areas in lowland of southwestern India supply sufficient evidence of tree trunks of wet evergreen forests getting buried during the Holocene period under varying thickness of clay, silty-clay and even in sand sequences. This preserved subfossil log assemblage forms an excellent proxy for eco-geomorphological and palaeoclimate appraisal reported hitherto from Indian subcontinent, and complements the available palynological data. The bulk of the subfossil logs and partially carbonized wood remains have yielded age prior to the Holocene transgression of 6.5 k yrs BP, suggesting therein that flooding due to heavy rainfall drowned the forest cover, even extending to parts of the present shelf. These preserved logs represent a unique palaeoenvironmental database as they contain observable cellular structure. Some of them can even be compared to modern analogues. As these woods belong to the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, they form a valuable source of climate data that alleviates the lack of contemporaneous meteorological records. These palaeoforests along with pollen proxies depict the warmer environment in this region, which is consistent with a Mid Holocene Thermal Maximum often referred to as Holocene Climate Optimum. Thus, the subfossil logs of tropical evergreen forests constitute new indices of Asian palaeomonsoon, while their occurrence and preservation are attributed to eco-geomorphology and hydrological regimes associated with the intensified Asian Summer Monsoon, as recorded elsewhere.
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Ameliorative potential of Tamarindus indica on high fat diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.
ScientificWorldJournal
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the prevalence of which is rising globally with current upsurge in obesity, is one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver diseases. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Tamarindus indica seed coat (ETS) on high fat diet (HFD) induced NAFLD, after daily administration at 45, 90, and 180 mg/kg body weight dose levels for a period of 6 weeks, in albino Wistar rats. Treatment with ETS at all tested dose levels significantly attenuated the pathological alterations associated with HFD induced NAFLD viz. hepatomegaly, elevated hepatic lipid and lipid peroxides, serum alanine aminotransferase, and free fatty acid levels as well as micro-/macrohepatic steatosis. Moreover, extract treatment markedly reduced body weight and adiposity along with an improvement in insulin resistance index. The study findings, therefore suggested the therapeutic potential of ETS against NAFLD, acting in part through antiobesity, insulin sensitizing, and antioxidant mechanisms.
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Citric Acid mediates the iron absorption from low molecular weight human milk fractions.
J. Agric. Food Chem.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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Previously, we have demonstrated increased iron absorption from low molecular weight (LMW) human milk whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of heat denaturation, zinc (a competitor of iron), duodenal cytochrome b (DcytB) antibody neutralization and citrate lyase treatment on LMW human milk fraction (>5 kDa referred as 5kF) induced ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Heat denaturation and zinc inhibited the 5kF fraction induced ferric iron reduction. In contrast, zinc but not heat denaturation abrogated the ferric iron solubilization activity. Despite inhibition of ferric iron reduction, iron uptake in Caco-2 cells was similar from both native and heat denatured 5kF fractions. However, iron uptake was higher from native compared to heat denatured 5kF fractions in the cells preincubated with the DcytB antibody. Citrate lyase treatment inhibited the ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. These findings demonstrate that citric acid present in human milk solubilizes the ferric iron which could be reduced by other heat labile components leading to increased uptake in intestinal cells.
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Commentary on the Interactions of HIV and Alcohol in the Central Nervous System.
Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2013
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This commentary is to highlight the relevance and public interest of the review published by Silverstein and Kumar, which focuses on the mechanisms by which alcohol and HIV-1 infection cause increased in central nervous system (CNS) damage. The overall review is based on previous literature with cell culture systems and animal models that have demonstrated that exposure to alcohol and HIV infection or HIV viral proteins result in synergistic up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. The authors discuss the effects of alcohol on cells in the CNS, followed by a brief discussion on the impact of HIV-1 and HIV proteins on the CNS, and the final section focuses on the combined effects of HIV and alcohol on the CNS as determined by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies.
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HIV infection and drugs of abuse: role of acute phase proteins.
J Neuroinflammation
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2013
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HIV infection and drugs of abuse such as methamphetamine (METH), cocaine, and alcohol use have been identified as risk factors for triggering inflammation. Acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are the biomarkers of inflammation. Hence, the interactive effect of drugs of abuse with acute phase proteins in HIV-positive subjects was investigated.
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Magneto-electric nanoparticles to enable field-controlled high-specificity drug delivery to eradicate ovarian cancer cells.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe?O? @BaTiO? MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells.
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Image-guided drug delivery to the brain using nanotechnology.
Drug Discov. Today
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Targeting across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases represents the most challenging aspect of, as well as one of the largest growing fields in, neuropharmaceutics. Combining nanotechnology with multiple imaging techniques has a unique role in the diagnosis and treatment (theranostics) of CNS disease. Such imaging techniques include anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), electron microscopy, autoradiography and optical imaging as well as thermal images. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent advances in formulations, current challenges and possible hypotheses concerning the use of such theranostics across the BBB.
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Latest trends in drugs of abuse - HIV infection and neuroAIDS.
Future Virol
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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Drug abuse and co-occurring infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In particular, HIV infection is associated with serious neurological complications, including neuroAIDS. Therefore, on 13-15 September 2012, the OMICS Group (USA) and Shailendra K Saxena (Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, India) hosted a symposium titled: Drugs of Abuse - HIV Infection and NeuroAIDS: A Global Perspective that was cochaired by Jag H Khalsa and Jeymohan Joseph of the NIH, MD, USA, at the 3rd World Congress on Biotechnology, in Hyderabad, India. Renowned scientists from India and the USA highlighted a number of issues, including the epidemiology, causes and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of neuroAIDS, impact on health, and designing new treatment modalities (e.g., nanotherapeutics) for the treatment of neurological disorders.
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Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13-15 y of age, from 2 government-run residential schools. Participants were given a standardized rice meal (regular) and the same meal with 100 g of guava fruit (modified) with (57)Fe on 2 consecutive days. A single oral dose of (58)Fe in orange juice was given at a separate time as a reference dose. Zinc absorption was assessed by using (70)Zn, administered intravenously, and (67)Zn given orally with meals. The mean hemoglobin concentration was similar in girls (129 ± 7.8 g/L) and boys (126 ± 7.1 g/L). There were no sex differences in the indicators of iron and zinc status except for a higher hepcidin concentration in boys (P < 0.05). The regular and modified meals were similar in total iron (10-13 mg/meal) and zinc (2.7 mg/meal) content. The molar ratio of iron to phytic acid was >1:1, but the modified diet had 20 times greater ascorbic acid content. The absorption of (57)Fe from the modified meal, compared with regular meal, was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in both girls (23.9 ± 11.2 vs. 9.7 ± 6.5%) and boys (19.2 ± 8.4 vs. 8.6 ± 4.1%). Fractional zinc absorption was similar between the regular and modified meals in both sexes. Hepcidin was found to be a significant predictor of iron absorption (standardized ? = -0.63, P = 0.001, R(2) = 0.40) from the reference dose. There was no significant effect of sex on iron and zinc bioavailability from meals. We conclude that simultaneous ingestion of guava fruit with a habitual rice-based meal enhances iron bioavailability in adolescents.
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An experimental approach for selecting appropriate rodent diets for research studies on metabolic disorders.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2013
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Diverse high energy diets have been utilized to precipitate obesity and related metabolic disorders in rodent models, though the dietary intervention has not absolutely been standardized. The present study established usage of a customized semipurified normal control diet (NCD) and high fat diet (HFD), for research studies on diet-induced metabolic disorders in albino rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with normal pellet diet (NPD) or customized NCDs I, II, III or HFDs I, II, III for 12 weeks and parameters, namely, body weight, visceral adiposity, serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and glucose were evaluated to select an appropriate NCD and HFD. The selected HFD was further evaluated for induction of fatty liver, whilst type 2 diabetes (T2D) induction was confirmed in HFD and streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes model in Wistar rats. Amongst different diets tested, NCD-I and HFD-I were selected, since NCD-I exhibited close resemblance to NPD, whereas HFD-I induced metabolic alterations, particularly obesity and dyslipidemia consistently. Moreover, HFD-I elevated terminal hepatic lipids, while HFD-I/STZ treatment augmented insulin resistance index and serum glucose levels significantly indicating effective induction of fatty liver and T2D, respectively. Therefore, customized semipurified NCD-I and HFD-I can be recommended for research studies on diet-induced metabolic disorders in albino Wistar rats.
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Externally controlled on-demand release of anti-HIV drug using magneto-electric nanoparticles as carriers.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy has resulted in remarkable decline in the morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients, inadequately low delivery of anti-retroviral drugs across the blood-brain barrier results in virus persistence. The capability of high-efficacy-targeted drug delivery and on-demand release remains a formidable task. Here we report an in vitro study to demonstrate the on-demand release of azidothymidine 5-triphosphate, an anti-human immunodeficiency virus drug, from 30 nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 magneto-electric nanoparticles by applying a low alternating current magnetic field. Magneto-electric nanoparticles as field-controlled drug carriers offer a unique capability of field-triggered release after crossing the blood-brain barrier. Owing to the intrinsic magnetoelectricity, these nanoparticles can couple external magnetic fields with the electric forces in drug-carrier bonds to enable remotely controlled delivery without exploiting heat. Functional and structural integrity of the drug after the release was confirmed in in vitro experiments with human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells and through atomic force microscopy, spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometry studies.
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Differential expression and functional role of cannabinoid genes in alcohol users.
Drug Alcohol Depend
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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Genetic factors account for about fifty percent of the risk for alcoholism and alcohol dependence (AD) has been reported to be influenced by cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) and the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Previous studies have focused on cannabinoids and alcohol-related effects in the CNS; however, the role CBRs play on alcohol effects in the immune system has not been elucidated yet. Since alcohol can affect immune responses and have detrimental effects on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), we hypothesize that alcohol can exert its effects on DCs by modulating changes in CBRs, which in turn can regulate important DC functions such as cytokine production.
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Impact of iron-fortified foods on Hb concentration in children (<10 years): a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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OBJECTIVE: To combine evidence from randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of Fe-fortified foods on mean Hb concentration in children (<10 years). DESIGN: We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled, Fe-fortified feeding trials that evaluated Hb concentration. The weighted mean difference was calculated for net changes in Hb by using random-effects models. Meta-regression and covariate analyses were performed to explore the influence of confounders on the net pooled effect. SETTING: Trials were identified through a systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and secondary references. SUBJECTS: Eighteen studies covering 5142 participants were identified. The duration of feeding of fortified foods ranged from 6 to 12 months in these studies. RESULTS: Eighteen studies were included and evaluated in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled estimate of Hb concentration showed a significant increase in the fortification group compared with the control group (weighted mean difference = 5·09 g/l; 95 % CI 3·23, 6·95 g/l; I 2 = 90 %, ? 2 = 18·37, P < 0·0001). Meta-regression analysis indicated that duration of feeding was positively related to the effect size (regression coefficient = 0·368; 95 % CI 0·005, 0·731; P < 0·05). The net pooled effect size after removing the confounders was 4·74 (95 % CI 3·08, 6·40) g/l. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an association between intake of Fe-fortified foods and Hb concentration in children aged <10 years. Fe-fortified foods could be an effective strategy for reducing Fe-deficiency anaemia in children.
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Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Reverses ?-Amyloid1-42 Induced Toxicity in Human Neuronal Cells: Implications in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Alzheimers disease (AD) is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS) also known as ashwagandha is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against ?-Amyloid (1-42)-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1) extract of ashwagandha against ?-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B) infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that ?-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to ?-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against ?-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B) induced neuro-pathogenesis.
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Targeted brain derived neurotropic factors (BDNF) delivery across the blood-brain barrier for neuro-protection using magnetic nano carriers: an in-vitro study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Parenteral use of drugs; such as opiates exert immunomodulatory effects and serve as a cofactor in the progression of HIV-1 infection, thereby potentiating HIV related neurotoxicity ultimately leading to progression of NeuroAIDS. Morphine exposure is known to induce apoptosis, down regulate cAMP response element-binding (CREB) expression and decrease in dendritic branching and spine density in cultured cells. Use of neuroprotective agent; brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which protects neurons against these effects, could be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of opiate addiction. Previous studies have shown that BDNF was not transported through the blood brain barrier (BBB) in-vivo.; and hence it is not effective in-vivo. Therefore development of a drug delivery system that can cross BBB may have significant therapeutic advantage. In the present study, we hypothesized that magnetically guided nanocarrier may provide a viable approach for targeting BDNF across the BBB. We developed a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) based carrier bound to BDNF and evaluated its efficacy and ability to transmigrate across the BBB using an in-vitro BBB model. The end point determinations of BDNF that crossed BBB were apoptosis, CREB expression and dendritic spine density measurement. We found that transmigrated BDNF was effective in suppressing the morphine induced apoptosis, inducing CREB expression and restoring the spine density. Our results suggest that the developed nanocarrier will provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat opiate addiction, protect neurotoxicity and synaptic density degeneration.
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Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B), which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C) that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2) Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (?3 fold) down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (?3 fold) up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1) was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of apoptosis in astrocytes may contribute to the severe neuropathogenesis in clade B infection.
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Infertility in WNIN Obese Mutant Rats-Causes?
ISRN Endocrinol
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
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We are maintaining two obese mutant rat strains (WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GR-Ob) in our animal facility since 1997. These rat colonies are perpetuated by crossing heterozygous littermates, since the obese phenotypes of both genders turned out be infertile. The present study revealed the reasons for this infertility. The male obese rats, though appeared normal in terms of sperm count, sperm motility and testis histology, however found wanting in terms of libido. This appeared to be due to low circulating testosterone levels seen in these animals, which should also account for low testis and accessory gland weights seen in them. The females exhibited delayed puberty, in terms of days taken for opening of vagina, irregular oestrus cycles and had small ovaries and short and stumpy uterine horns. The FSH peak observed in control lean animals during oestrus stage of the sexual cycle and also the E2 peak of normal oestrus cycle was conspicuously absent in these animals. They also showed elevated levels of progesterone throughout the sexual cycle. Thus the infertility seen in these mutants could be attributed to their abnormal gonadosteroid levels and the resulting anatomical and physiological defects.
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Prevalence of ocular signs and subclinical vitamin A deficiency and its determinants among rural pre-school children in India.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2011
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To assess the magnitude and determinants of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and coverage of vitamin A supplementation (VAS) among pre-school children.
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Perceived stress, life events & coping among higher secondary students of Hyderabad, India: a pilot study.
Indian J. Med. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2011
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Psychosocial stressors leading to allostatic load need to be explored further as these have great scope for early intervention. Stress studies done in India are mostly based on sources of stress and objective measures of stress. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess stress appraisal among students (16-17 yr) and to identify institution-specific differences (Private vs. Government) in stress appraisal and coping.
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Prevalence of clinical and sub-clinical vitamin A deficiency among rural preschool children of West Bengal, India.
Indian Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in rural areas of West Bengal with the aim to assess the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) among rural preschool children. Clinical examination was carried out on 9,228 children for the signs and symptoms of VAD and a sub-sample of 590 children were covered for the estimation of blood vitamin A levels using dried blood spot (DBS) method. The prevalence of Bitots spots was 0.6% (95% CI=0.44, 0.76), which is more than the public health significance, and it increased with increase in age. The prevalence was significantly higher (P<0.001) among boys (0.8%) as compared to girls (0.4%). The proportion of children with subclinical vitamin A deficiency (blood vitamin A < 20 ug/dL) was 61% (95% CI: 52.3-65.1), and it was significantly (P<0.01) higher among the children of lower socioeconomic communities.
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Coordinate expression and localization of iron and zinc transporters explain iron-zinc interactions during uptake in Caco-2 cells: implications for iron uptake at the enterocyte.
J. Nutr. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Iron and zinc have diverse and important physiological functions. Yet, the mechanism of their absorption at the intestine remains controversial and is confounded by the fact that many studies have shown, to varying extents, that they inhibit the absorption of each other. We have studied the expression of iron and zinc transporters and storage proteins, and their regulation, in Caco-2 cells, an established enterocyte model, under normal culture conditions and under conditions of iron and zinc depletion and supplementation using a combination of immunoblotting, confocal microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We show that divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) delocalizes from the plasma membrane upon iron or zinc depletion, but its apical abundance increases with zinc supplementation. This translocation of DMT-1 coincides with an increase in iron uptake upon zinc supplementation, as previously reported by us. FPN-1 expression increases upon zinc supplementation and decreases with iron or zinc depletion, effluxing the excess sequestered iron and thus maintaining cellular iron homeostasis. Zinc influx transporters Zip-1 and Zip-14 and efflux transporters ZnT-1 and ZnT-4 are coordinately regulated under conditions of zinc supplementation and depletion to ensure cellular zinc homeostasis. We have previously reported that iron uptake can entail two transporters and that zinc noncompetitively inhibits iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. We now provide evidence that this inhibition is independent of DMT-1 and that Zip-14 may be a relevant iron transporter. These new observations provide experimental support to this two-transporter model of iron uptake and give mechanistic insight to iron-zinc interactions during uptake at the enterocyte.
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MicroRNA: implications in HIV, a brief overview.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20-22 nucleotide length noncoding RNA molecules that represent key regulators of many normal cellular functions. miRNAs undergo two processing steps which transform a long primary transcript into the mature miRNA. Available literatures demonstrate the association between alterations in the expression of miRNAs and the progression of numerous human disorders. Even though significant advances have been made, many fundamental questions about their expression and function still remain unanswered. Identifying factors that block the negative action of drugs of abuse on the miRNAs could help in identifying new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we briefly discuss the importance of miRNAs on HIV, strategies used by virus to avoid the cells antiviral miRNA defenses, and how HIV might control and regulate host cell genes by encoding viral miRNAs.
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HIV-1 gp120 induces antioxidant response element-mediated expression in primary astrocytes: role in HIV associated neurocognitive disorder.
Neurochem. Int.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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HIV infection affects the central nervous system resulting in HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), which is characterized by depression, behavioral and motor dysfunctions. The HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp120 is known to induce the release of neurotoxic factors which lead to apoptotic cell death. Although the exact mechanisms involved in HIV-1 gp120-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, oxidative stress is suggested to play a vital role in the neuropathogenesis of HAND. Astrocytes represent major population of the non-neuronal cell type in the brain and play a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of HAND. Increased oxidative stress is known to induce nuclear factor erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor which is known to regulate the antioxidant defensive mechanism. However, the role of Nrf2 in HAND has not been elucidated. We report that gp120 significantly upregulates Nrf2 in human astrocytes and is associated with stimulation of key antioxidant defensive enzymes Hemoxygenase (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1 (Nqo1). Pretreatment of the astrocytes with antioxidants or a specific calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, significantly blocked the upregulation of Nrf2, HO-1 and Nqo1. These results suggest a possible role of the intracellular calcium and oxidative stress in Nrf2 mediated antioxidant defense mechanism, which may have protective role in promoting cell survival.
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Effects of alcohol on histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and the neuroprotective role of trichostatin A (TSA).
Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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Previous studies have implicated histone deacetylases (HDACs) and HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) such as trichostatin A (TSA) in the regulation of gene expression during drug addiction. Furthermore, an increase in HDAC activity has been linked to neurodegeneration. Alcohol has also been shown to promote abundant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in oxidative stress. TSA inhibits HDACs and has been shown to be neuroprotective in other neurodegenerative disease models. Although HDACs and HDIs have been associated with drug addiction, there is no evidence of the neurodegenerative role of HDAC2 and neuroprotective role of TSA in alcohol addiction. Therefore, we hypothesize that alcohol modulates HDAC2 through mechanisms involving oxidative stress.
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B and C gp120 differentially induce neurotoxin arachidonic acid in human astrocytes: implications for neuroAIDS.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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HIV-1 clades (subtypes) differentially contribute to the neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) in neuroAIDS. HIV-1 envelop protein, gp120, plays a major role in neuronal function. It is not well understood how these HIV-1 clades exert these neuropathogenic differences. The N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor-reduced glutamine synthesis could lead to secretion of neurotoxins such as arachidonic acid (AA) which plays a significant role in the neuropathogenic mechanisms in neuroAIDS. We hypothesize that clade B and C gp120 proteins exert differential effects on human primary astrocytes by production of the neurotoxin arachidonic acid. Our results indicate that clade B gp120 significantly downregulated NMDA receptor gene and protein expression, and level of glutamine while increasing expression of prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) and thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA(2) R) compared to HIV-1 clade C gp120 protein. Thus, our studies for the first time demonstrate that HIV-1 clade B-gp120 protein appears to induce higher levels of expression of the neuropathogenic molecule cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid by-products, PGE(2), and TBXA(2) R compared to HIV-1 clade C gp120 protein. These studies suggest that HIV-1 clade B and C gp120 proteins may play a differential role in the neuropathogenesis of HAD in neuroAIDS.
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Bioavailability of iron and zinc from multiple micronutrient fortified beverage premixes in Caco-2 cell model.
J. Food Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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Iron and zinc deficiencies are the most prevalent nutrient deficiencies worldwide. They often coexist as the dietary factors, especially phytate, which impairs iron absorption also affects zinc absorption. Therefore, suitable strategies are required to control multiple micronutrient deficiencies in populations that subsist on high-phytate foods such as the whole wheat flour based Indian bread (chapatti). The objective of the study, therefore, was to test the bioavailability of iron and zinc in 2 multiple micronutrient beverage premixes in the absence and presence of?chapatti. The premix-1 contained iron, zinc, and vitamin A while premix-2 contained all micronutrients in premix-1, plus folic acid and ascorbic acid. Ferritin induction and (65)Zn uptake were assessed using coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell line model as the surrogate markers of iron and zinc bioavailability, respectively. The results show that iron bioavailability from premixes-1 and 2 was similar in the absence of?chapatti. However, premix-2 showed significantly higher iron bioavailability compared to premix-1 in the presence of?chapatti. In contrast, the zinc uptake was similar from both premixes-1 and 2 in the absence or presence of?chapatti. These results suggest that both the premixes provide bioavailable minerals, but premix-2 appears to be promising in the presence of foods that have high phytate.
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HIV-1 Tat upregulates expression of histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) in human neurons: implication for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).
Neurochem. Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2011
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Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a pivotal role in epigenetic regulation of transcription and homeostasis of protein acetylation in histones and other proteins involved in chromatin remodeling. Histone hypoacetylation and transcriptional dysfunction have been shown to be associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. More recently, neuron specific overexpression of HDAC2 has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning behavior in mice. However, the role of HDAC2 in development of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is not reported. Herein we report that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulate HDAC2 expression in neuronal cells leading to transcriptional repression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function thereby contributing to the progression of HAND. Our results indicate upregulation of HDAC2 by Tat treatment in dose and time dependant manner by human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells and primary human neurons. Further, HDAC2 overexpression was associated with concomitant downregulation in CREB and CaMKIIa genes that are known to regulate neuronal activity. These observed effects were completely blocked by HDAC2 inhibition. These results for the first time suggest the possible role of HDAC2 in development of HAND. Therefore, use of HDAC2 specific inhibitor in combination with HAART may be of therapeutic value in treatment of neurocognitive disorders observed in HIV-1 infected individuals.
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Occurrence of granulomas in bovines: an abattoir-based study.
ISRN Vet Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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The present study was carried out to record the occurrence of naturally occurring granulomas in cattle and buffaloes. Tissues grossly suspected for granulomas were collected from 336 out of 1600 (21%) abattoir cases. The gross features ranged from focal necrosis to large caseated masses, hard nodules, growths and abscesses. Histopathologically, 102 tissue samples (6.38%) were ascertained as granulomas. Majority of the granulomas were found in the liver 42 (41.18%), followed by lungs 22 (20.59%), lymph nodes 11 (10.78%), kidneys 6 (5.88%) and 14 (13.73%) as subcutaneous nodules/growths. Solitary cases were found in tongue, muscle, and urinary bladder, whereas 4 granulomas (3.92%) were found in body cavities. Based on the cellular component, the granulomas were categorized as epithelioid (53%), eosinophilic (37%) and suppurative (10%). Employing special staining techniques, the possible etiology of 75 granulomas could be identified. Among these, 70 granulomas (68.63%) were of infectious nature (parasitic 37 (36.28%), bacterial 32 (31.37%), and fungal 1(0.98%)). Non-infectious granulomas 5 cases (4.90%) included two lipid granulomas (1.96%), two granulomas (1.96%) associated with neoplasms and one (0.31%) associated with renal calculi. In 27 (26.47%) cases, the etiology of the granuloma could not be established and were categorized as granulomas of unknown etiology.
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Dietary ligands as determinants of iron-zinc interactions at the absorptive enterocyte.
J. Food Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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Iron and zinc interact at the enterocyte and influence the absorption of one another. We have previously reported that zinc noncompetitively inhibits iron uptake in Caco-2 cells, a widely accepted model of the absorptive enterocyte. However, the determinants of this interaction, such as the effect of dietary ligands, remain uncharacterized. Dietary ligands selectively chelate iron and zinc in definite stoichiometric proportions and thus alter the bioavailability from food matrices. Here, we have used common dietary ligands, such as ascorbic acid, phytic acid, tannic acid, tartaric acid, cysteine, histidine, and methionine to characterize iron, zinc uptake individually and in combination, using Caco-2 cells. Selective chelation of zinc, using cysteine, decreased the magnitude of inhibition of iron uptake but could not reverse the inhibition. On the other hand, selective increase in iron uptake in the presence of methionine resulted in increased zinc uptake, rather than inhibition. Taken together, these in vitro results suggest that dietary ligands can modulate iron-zinc interaction and that zinc cannot competitively inhibit iron uptake.
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Implications of ER stress, the unfolded protein response, and pro- and anti-apoptotic protein fingerprints in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells treated with alcohol.
Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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Dendritic cells (DCs) are responsible for the activation of T cells and B cells. There is accumulating evidence that psychoactive substances such as alcohol can affect immune responses. We hypothesize that this occurs by modulating changes in proteins triggering a process known as unfolded protein response (UPR). This process protects cells from the toxic effects of misfolded proteins responsible for causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Although much is known about ER stress, little is understood about the consequences of ethanol use on DCs protein expression.
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Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and its determinants among the rural pre-school children of Madhya Pradesh, India.
Ann. Hum. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) continues to be a major public health nutritional problem in India, even though the National Vitamin A Prophylaxis Programme has been in operation for more than three decades.
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Interactive role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade-specific Tat protein and cocaine in blood-brain barrier dysfunction: implications for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2010
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In recent years, increasing interest has emerged to assess the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade C viral pathogenesis due to its anticipated spread in the United States and other western countries. Previous studies suggest that clade C is less neuropathogenic than clade B; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Additionally, the interactive role of drugs of abuse such as cocaine on clade C-associated neuropathogenesis has not been reported. In the current study, we hypothesize that HIV-1 clade-specific Tat proteins exert differential effects on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and cocaine further differentially aggravates the BBB dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of Tat B and Tat C and/or cocaine on the BBB integrity using an in vitro model constructed with primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and astrocytes. The BBB membrane integrity was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran transport assay and monocytes transmigration across the BBB. Results indicate that Tat B disrupts BBB integrity to a greater extent compared to Tat C and cocaine further differentially exacerbates the BBB dysfunction. This BBB dysfunction was associated with altered expression of tight junction proteins zona occuldens (ZO-1) and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-2. Thus, these results for the first time delineate the differential role of Tat B and Tat C and/or cocaine in BBB dysfunction, which may be correlated with the clade-specific differences observed in HIV-1-associated neurological disorders.
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B and C Tat differentially induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and serotonin in immature dendritic cells: Implications for neuroAIDS.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2010
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and the suppression of antigen-presenting cells. This results in immune alterations, which could lead to impaired neuronal functions, such as neuroAIDS. The neurotoxic factor kynurenine (KYN), the rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), serotonin (5-HT), and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) may play a role in tryptophan deficiency and serotogenic dysfunction in neuroAIDS. HIV-1 transactivator regulatory protein (Tat) is known to play a major role in immune dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that HIV-1 B and C clades differentially manifest neuronal dysfunctions in the infected host. In the present study we examine the effect of HIV-1 B and C clade-derived Tat on IDO and 5-HTT gene and protein expressions by dendritic cells as studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot. In addition, the intracellular IDO expression, IDO enzyme activity, and the levels of 5-HT and KYN were also measured. Results indicate that HIV-1 clade B Tat up-regulates IDO and down-regulates 5-HTT gene and protein expressions. Further, HIV-1 clade B Tat caused a reduction of 5-HT with simultaneous increase in KYN levels as compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat. These studies suggest that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins may play a differential role in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).
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Polyphenol-rich beverages enhance zinc uptake and metallothionein expression in Caco-2 cells.
J. Food Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2010
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The effect of red wine (RW), red grape juice (RGJ), green tea (GT), and representative polyphenols on Caco-2 cell (65)Zn uptake was explored. RW, RGJ, and GT enhanced the uptake of zinc from rice matrix. Fractionation of RW revealed that enhancing activity of zinc uptake was exclusively resided in the polyphenol fraction. Among the polyphenols tested, only tannic acid and quercitin stimulated the uptake of zinc while others did not influence the uptake. In tune with these results, only tannic acid and quercitin competed with zinquin (a zinc selective fluorophore) for zinc in vitro. Although all the polyphenols tested appear to enhance the expression of metallothionein (MT), the induction was higher with tannic acid, quercitin, and RW extract. Furthermore, phytic acid abrogated the tannic acid-induced MT expression. These results suggest that polyphenol-rich beverages, tannic acid, and quercitin bind and stimulate the zinc uptake and MT expression in Caco-2 cells.
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Low cholesterol? Dont brag yet ... hypocholesterolemia blunts HAART effectiveness: a longitudinal study.
J Int AIDS Soc
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2010
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In vitro studies suggest that reducing cholesterol inhibits HIV replication. However, this effect may not hold in vivo, where other factors, such as cholesterols immunomodulatory properties, may interact.
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Effect of methamphetamine on expression of HIV coreceptors and CC-chemokines by dendritic cells.
Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2010
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The United States is currently experiencing an entangled epidemic of HIV infection and use of different drugs of abuse, especially of methamphetamine (Meth). Blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1 infection, and are the initial target of HIV-1 infection in injection drug users. DC-SIGN present on dendritic cells is the first molecule that facilitates HIV-1 infection independent of CD4 or HIV coreceptors.
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Magnetic nanoformulation of azidothymidine 5-triphosphate for targeted delivery across the blood-brain barrier.
Int J Nanomedicine
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
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Despite significant advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence of neuroAIDS remains high. This is mainly attributed to inability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus resulting in insufficient drug concentration within the brain. Therefore, development of an active drug targeting system is an attractive strategy to increase the efficacy and delivery of ART to the brain. We report herein development of magnetic azidothymidine 5-triphosphate (AZTTP) liposomal nanoformulation and its ability to transmigrate across an in vitro BBB model by application of an external magnetic field. We hypothesize that this magnetically guided nanoformulation can transverse the BBB by direct transport or via monocyte-mediated transport. Magnetic AZTTP liposomes were prepared using a mixture of phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol. The average size of prepared liposomes was about 150 nm with maximum drug and magnetite loading efficiency of 54.5% and 45.3%, respectively. Further, magnetic AZTTP liposomes were checked for transmigration across an in vitro BBB model using direct or monocyte-mediated transport by application of an external magnetic field. The results show that apparent permeability of magnetic AZTTP liposomes was 3-fold higher than free AZTTP. Also, the magnetic AZTTP liposomes were efficiently taken up by monocytes and these magnetic monocytes showed enhanced transendothelial migration compared to normal/non-magnetic monocytes in presence of an external magnetic field. Thus, we anticipate that the developed magnetic nanoformulation can be used for targeting active nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help to treat neuroAIDS.
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Zinc inhibits oxidative stress-induced iron signaling and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells.
Free Radic. Biol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Studies in humans and animals have suggested negative interactions of iron and zinc during their intestinal absorption. Further, zinc seems to prevent iron-induced oxidative damage in rats, which was hypothesized to be through the modulation of the intracellular iron signaling pathway. The aim of this study was, therefore, to understand the effects of zinc on oxidant-induced iron signaling and cell death in human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. We demonstrate that zinc decreases glucose/glucose oxidase (H(2)O(2)-generating system)-induced iron uptake and inhibits iron-regulatory protein 1 activation and divalent metal ion transporter 1 expression. There was also a concomitant decrease in oxidant-induced intracellular labile iron and restoration of ferritin and metallothionein expression. Further, zinc enhanced the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced caspase-3 activity, leading to inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid, an extracellular iron chelator, emulated the effects of zinc except for the reduced ferritin levels. These results suggest that zinc inhibits apoptosis by reducing oxidant-induced iron signaling in Caco-2 cells.
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Iron content, bioavailability & factors affecting iron status of Indians.
Indian J. Med. Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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Repeated surveys have shown that the magnitude of nutritional anaemia is of public health concern in India. Though reduced intake of iron is a major aetiological factor, low intake or an imbalance in the consumption of other haematopoietic nutrients, their utilization; increased nutrient loss and/or demand also contribute to nutritional anaemia. In India, cereals and millets form the bulk of the dietaries and are major sources of non-haeme iron. According to the current estimates, the intake of iron is less than 50 per cent of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) and iron density is about 8.5 mg/1000 Kcal. It is now well established that iron bioavailability from habitual Indian diets is low due to high phytate and low ascorbic acid/iron ratios. These factors determine iron bioavailability and the RDA. There are striking differences in the iron RDAs among the physiological groups, which need to be validated. The other dietary factors affecting iron status are inadequate intake of folic acid and vitamins B(12), A, C and other vitamins of the B-complex group. Chronic low grade inflammation and infections, and malaria also contribute significantly to iron malnutrition. Recent evidence of the interaction of hepcidin (iron hormone) and inflammatory stimuli on iron metabolism has opened new avenues to target iron deficiency anaemia. Food-based approaches to increase the intake of iron and other haematopoietic nutrients through dietary diversification and provision of hygienic environment are important sustainable strategies for correction of iron deficiency anaemia.
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Structural and antigenic variance between novel influenza A/H1N1/2009 and influenza A/H1N1/2008 viruses.
J Infect Dev Ctries
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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The emergence of influenza A/H1N1/2009 is alarming. The severity of previous epidemics suggests that the susceptibility of the human population to H1N1 is directly proportional to the degree of changes in hemagglutinin/HA and neuraminidase/NA; therefore, H1N1/2009 and H1N1/2008 were analyzed for their sequence as well as structural divergence.
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Iron-zinc interaction during uptake in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line: kinetic analyses and possible mechanism.
Indian J. Biochem. Biophys.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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Iron and zinc interact at the enterocyte during absorption, but the mechanism(s) remain elusive. The aim was, therefore, to understand the mechanism of interaction using kinetic analyses of iron and zinc uptake, individually and in combination under normal and altered cellular mineral concentrations in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. Striking differences in kinetic parameters were observed between iron and zinc uptake. Iron uptake followed a two-component model, while zinc uptake followed a three-component model. Iron uptake had a Km of 3.6 microM and Vmax of 452 pmol/mg protein/min, while zinc uptake had a Km of 42 microM and Vmax of 3.09 pmol/mg protein/min. Zinc dose-dependently inhibited iron uptake through mixed-inhibition but iron marginally increased zinc uptake. Cellular zinc repletion doubled iron uptake and eliminated inhibition, but zinc depletion decreased iron uptake. Iron pre-treatment had no effect on zinc uptake. Based on these results, a two-transporter model of iron uptake, comprising the apical iron uptake transporter divalent metal ion transporter-1 (DMT-1) and an unknown putative transporter was derived. This model for DMT-1 was verified by immunoblotting. These results implied that cellular zinc status profoundly influenced iron uptake and its interactions with zinc during uptake. DMT-1 might not simultaneously transport iron and zinc, providing a mechanistic basis for observed interactions.
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Differential effects of HIV type 1 clade B and clade C Tat protein on expression of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines by primary monocytes.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
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The existence of multiple subtypes of HIV-1 worldwide has created new challenges to control HIV-1 infection and associated neuropathogenesis. Previous studies indicate a difference in neuropathogenic manifestations of HIV-1-associated neuroAIDS between clade B- and clade C-infected subjects with clade B being more neuropathogenic than clade C. However, the exact mechanism underlying the differences in the neuropathogenesis by both the subtypes remains elusive. Development of neuroAIDS is associated with a complex interplay between proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In the current study, we hypothesize that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat protein exert differential effects on human primary monocytes leading to differences in gene and protein expression of cytokines implicated in neuroAIDS. Primary human monocytes were treated with clade B and clade C Tat protein and quantitative real time PCR was performed to determine gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and antiinflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Further, cytokine secretion was measured in culture supernatants by ELISA, whereas intracellular cytokine expression was detected by flow cytometry. Results indicate that monocytes treated with Tat B showed significant upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, as compared to Tat C-treated cultures. However, expression of antiinflammatory molecules and IL-4 and IL-10 was found to be higher in Tat C-treated compared to Tat B-treated cultures. Thus, our result shows for the first time that Tat B and Tat C differentially modulate expression of neuropathogenic molecules that may be correlated with the differences in neuroAIDS manifestation induced by clade-specific infections.
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AZT 5-triphosphate nanoformulation suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2009
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Inefficient cellular phosphorylation of nucleoside and nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) to their active nucleoside 5-triphosphate (NTPs) form is one of the limitations for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy. We report herein direct binding of 3-azido-3-deoxythymidine-5-triphosphate (AZTTP) onto magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4); magnetite) due to ionic interaction. This magnetic nanoparticle bound AZTTP (MP-AZTTP) completely retained its biological activity as assessed by suppression of HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The developed MP-AZTTP nanoformulation can be used for targeting active NRTIs to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help to treat NeuroAIDS.
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Upregulation of serotonin transporter by alcohol in human dendritic cells: possible implication in neuroimmune deregulation.
Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2009
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Alcohol is the most widely abused substance and its chronic consumption causes neurobehavioral disorders. It has been shown that alcohol affects the function of immune cells. Dendritic cells (DC) serve as the first line of defense against infections and are known to accumulate neurotransmitters such as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The enzyme monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) degrades 5-HT that is associated with clinical depression and other neurological disorders. 5-HT is selectively transported into neurons through the serotonin transporter (SERT), which is a member of the sodium- and chloride-dependent neurotransmitter transporter (SLC6) family. SERT also serves as a receptor for psychostimulant recreational drugs. It has been demonstrated that several drugs of abuse such as amphetamine and cocaine inhibit the SERT expression; however, the role of alcohol is yet to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alcohol can modulate SERT and MAO-A expression in DC, leading to reciprocal downregulation of 5-HT in extracellular medium.
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Screening for distress (the sixth vital sign) in a global recession: sustainable approach to maintain patient-centered care.
Future Oncol
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2009
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A substantial volume of research on the psychosocial impact of cancer clearly indicates that patients are likely to experience emotional distress. There is also evidence that psychosocial interventions aimed at decreasing distress provide tangible cost offsets to cancer patients, caregivers and treating institutions. One seemingly major drawback in the setup and delivery of a fully fledged screening program for distress is the extensive pecuniary requirements. Given that the categorical need for distress screening may be confounded by financial limitations, especially in a time of global recession, a cost-effective alternative seems appropriate. The model proposed herein is not a substitute screening program, nor does it eliminate the need to allocate resources to address the identified risks. It does, however, offer a cost-effective alternative to implement a high-risk distress patient identifying process, quite similar to algorithms used in screening for prostate cancer.
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Studies on Cu(II) ternary complexes involving an aminopenicillin drug and imidazole containing ligands.
Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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Equilibrium studies on the ternary complex systems involving ampicillin (amp) as ligand (A) and imidazole containing ligands viz., imidazole (Him), benzimidazole (Hbim), histamine (Hist) and histidine (His) as ligands (B) at 37 degrees C and I=0.15 mol dm(-3) (NaClO(4)) show the presence of CuABH, CuAB and CuAB(2). The proton in the CuABH species is attached to ligand A. In the ternary complexes the ligand, amp(A) binds the metal ion via amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen atom. The CuAB (B=Hist/His)/CuAB(2) (B=Him/Hbim) species have also been isolated and the analytical data confirmed its formation. Non-electrolytic behavior and monomeric type of chelates have been assessed from their low conductance and magnetic susceptibility values. The electronic and vibrational spectral results were interpreted to find the mode of binding of ligands to metal and geometry of the complexes. This is also supported by the g tensor values calculated from ESR spectra. The thermal behaviour of complexes were studied by TGA/DTA. The redox behavior of the complexes has been studied by cyclic voltammetry. The antimicrobial activity and CT DNA cleavage study of the complexes show higher activity for ternary complexes.
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The role of alcohol on platelets, thymus and cognitive performance among HIV-infected subjects: are they related?
Platelets
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
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Our objective was to evaluate whether thrombocytopenia and small thymus volume, which may be associated with hazardous alcohol consumption, are predictors of cognitive performance after highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). To achieve this goal 165 people living with HIV starting HAART underwent thymus magnetic resonance imaging, cognitive (HIV Dementia Score [HDS] and the California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT]), immune and laboratory assessments at baseline and after 6 months of HAART. At baseline, hazardous alcohol consumption was significantly correlated with both thymus size (r = -0.44, p = 0.003) and thrombocytopenia (r = 0.28, p = 0.001). Of interest, thrombocytopenic patients were characterized by a smaller thymus size. Individuals with and without cognitive impairment differed in alcohol consumption, platelet counts and thymus size, suggesting that they may be risk factors for neurological abnormalities. In fact, after HAART hazardous alcohol use associations with thrombocytopenia were related to cognitive decline (learning = -0.2 +/- 0.8, recall = -0.3 +/- 0.1 and HDS = -0.5). This contrasted with improvements on every cognitive measure (learning = 1.6 +/- 0.3, p = 0.0001, recall = 2.2 +/- 0.4, p = 0.0001 and HDS = 1.0, p = 0.05) in those with neither alcohol use nor thrombocytopenia. In adjusted analyses for sociodemographics, adherence and immune measurements, reduced thymus size was associated with a 90% and thrombocytopenia with a 70% increase in the risk of scoring in the demented range after HAART (RR = 1.9, p < 0.05 and RR = 1.7, p = 0.03) and with low CVLT scores (thymus volume RR = 2.0, p = 0.04, chronic alcohol use p = 0.05 and thrombocytopenia p = 0.06). Thymus volume and platelet counts were negatively affected by alcohol and were predictors of cognitive performance and improvements after HAART. These results could have important clinical and therapeutic implications.
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Methamphetamine enhances HIV-1 infectivity in monocyte derived dendritic cells.
J Neuroimmune Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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The US is currently experiencing an epidemic of methamphetamine (Meth) use as a recreational drug. Recent studies also show a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection among Meth users. We report that Meth enhances HIV-1 infectivity of dendritic cells as measured by multinuclear activation of a galactosidase indicator (MAGI) cell assay, p24 assay, and LTR-RU5 amplification. Meth induces increased HIV-1 infection in association with an increase in the HIV-1 coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, and infection is mediated by downregulation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK2) and the upregulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A p38 inhibitor (SB203580) specifically reversed the Meth-induced upregulation of the CCR5 HIV-1 coreceptor. The dopamine D2 receptor antagonist RS +/- sulpiride significantly reversed the Meth-induced upregulation of CCR5, demonstrating that the Meth-induced effect is mediated via the D2 receptor. These studies report for the first time that Meth fosters HIV-1 infection, potentially via upregulating coreceptor gene expression. Further, Meth mediates its regulatory effects via dopamine receptors and via downregulating ERK2 with a reciprocal upregulation of p38 MAPK. Elucidation of the role of Meth in HIV-1 disease susceptibility and the mechanism through which Meth mediates its effects on HIV-1 infection may help to devise novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in high-risk Meth-using HIV-1-infected subjects.
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Differential regulation of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by HIV type 1 clade B and C Tat protein.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Previous studies have demonstrated that infection with HIV-1 clades might differentially contribute to the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). HIV-1 transactivator regulatory protein (Tat) plays a major role in the process of disruption of neuronal function. It is not well understood how these HIV-1 subtypes exert different neuropathogenic effects. Activation of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway, leads to increased tryptophan catabolism and the generation of neurotoxins such as kynurenine (KYN). It is known that KYN plays a crucial role in the neuropathogenesis of HAD. We hypothesize that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins might exert differential effects on human primary astrocytes by the upregulation of the IDO gene and protein expression as well as its activity and production of the neurotoxin KYN. RNA extracted from human primary astrocytes treated with either HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins was reverse transcribed and analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR to determine IDO gene expression. In addition, the enzymatic activity of IDO and the concentration of KYN were measured in cell lysates and culture supernatants. Our results indicate that HIV-1 clade B Tat protein significantly upregulated the IDO gene and protein expression, IDO enzyme activity, as well as KYN concentration compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat protein. Thus, our studies for the first time demonstrate that HIV-1 clade B Tat protein in human primary astrocytes appears to increase the level of neuropathogenic agents, such as IDO and KYN, as compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat protein. These results provide further evidence that the prevalence of HAD may be correlated with the difference in clades of HIV-1.
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Binding and stabilization of transthyretin by curcumin.
Arch. Biochem. Biophys.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2009
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Biophysical evidences suggest that transthyretin (TTR) tetramer dissociation to the monomeric intermediate and subsequent polymerization leads to amyloid fibril formation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) and senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA). Hence, inhibition of fibril formation is considered a potential therapeutic strategy. Here in we demonstrate that curcumin, a phenolic constituent of curry spice turmeric, binds to the active site of TTR through fluorescence quenching and ANS displacement studies. Binding of curcumin appears to inhibit the denaturant induced tertiary and quaternary structural changes in TTR as monitored by intrinsic emission fluorescence and glutaraldehyde cross-linking studies. However, curcumin did not bind to TTR at acidic pH. Protonation/ isomerization of the side chain oxygen atoms of curcumin at low pH might hamper the binding. These results suggest that curcumin binds to and stabilizes TTR thereby highlight the importance of the side chain conformations of the ligand in binding to TTR.
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Combinatorial cytotoxic effects of Curcuma longa and Zingiber officinale on the PC-3M prostate cancer cell line.
J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol
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Many plant-derived products exhibit potent chemopreventive activity against animal tumor models as well as rodent and human cancer cell lines. They have low side effects and toxicity and presumably modulate the factors that are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. The present study investigates the effects of some medicinal plant extracts from generally recognized as safe plants that may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cancer.
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Magneto-electric nano-particles for non-invasive brain stimulation.
PLoS ONE
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This paper for the first time discusses a computational study of using magneto-electric (ME) nanoparticles to artificially stimulate the neural activity deep in the brain. The new technology provides a unique way to couple electric signals in the neural network to the magnetic dipoles in the nanoparticles with the purpose to enable a non-invasive approach. Simulations of the effect of ME nanoparticles for non-invasively stimulating the brain of a patient with Parkinsons Disease to bring the pulsed sequences of the electric field to the levels comparable to those of healthy people show that the optimized values for the concentration of the 20-nm nanoparticles (with the magneto-electric (ME) coefficient of 100 V cm(-1) Oe(-1) in the aqueous solution) is 3 × 10(6) particles/cc, and the frequency of the externally applied 300-Oe magnetic field is 80 Hz.
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Modulation of HIV pathogenesis and T-cell signaling by HIV-1 Nef.
Future Virol
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HIV-1 Nef protein is an approximately 27-kDa myristoylated protein that is a virulence factor essential for efficient viral replication and infection in CD4(+) T cells. The functions of CD4(+) T cells are directly impeded after HIV infection. HIV-1 Nef plays a crucial role in manipulating host cellular machinery and in HIV pathogenesis by reducing the ability of infected lymphocytes to form immunological synapses by promoting virological synapses with APCs, and by affecting T-cell stimulation. This article reviews the current status of the efficient Nef-mediated spread of virus in the unreceptive environment of the immune system by altering CD4(+) T-lymphocyte signaling, intracellular trafficking, cell migration and apoptotic pathways.
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Alcohol-induced serotonergic modulation: the role of histone deacetylases.
Alcohol
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Previous studies have demonstrated that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are regulated by multiple mechanisms such as neurotransmitters and enzymes. The neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) may contribute to alcohol effects and serotonin receptors, including 5-HT3, play an important role in AUDs. Recent studies have also implicated histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases (HATS) in regulation of drug addiction, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported as transcriptional modulators of monoaminergic neurotransmission. Therefore, we hypothesize that HDACs may play a role in ethanol-induced serotonergic modulation. The effects of ethanol on serotonin and 5-HT3, and the role HDACs, HDAC activity and the HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), play in alcohol-induced serotonergic effects were studied. Human SK-N-MC and neurons, were treated with ethanol (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%), and/or TSA (50 nM), and 5-HT3 levels were assessed at 24-72 h. Gene expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and protein by western blot and flow cytometry. Serotonin release was assessed by ELISA and HDAC activity by fluorometric assay. Our results show an increase in 5-HT3 gene after ethanol treatment. Further, ethanol significantly increased HDACs 1 and 3 genes accompanied by an increased in HDAC activity while TSA significantly inhibited HDACs. Studies with TSA show a significant upregulation of ethanol effects on 5-HT3, while surprisingly TSA inhibited ethanol-induced serotonin production. These results suggest that ethanol affects 5-HT3 and serotonin through mechanisms involving HDACs and HATs. In summary, our studies demonstrate some of the novel properties of HDAC inhibitors and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involve in alcohol-serotonergic modulation in the CNS.
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Silicone nanoparticles do not induce immune responses by naïve human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: implications in breast implants.
Plast. Reconstr. Surg.
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Several studies have reported adverse immunological effects of silicone due to their ability to induce proinflammatory molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In recent years, use of nanoparticles has been under fast development for therapeutic drug targeting, diagnostic imaging, and immune response in various fields of nanomedicine. The authors hypothesize that immune responses induced by in vivo use of silicone materials can be reduced or eliminated by the use of nanosilicone.
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Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.
AIDS Res Treat
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HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population.
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Chemopreventive potential of an ethyl acetate fraction from Curcuma longa is associated with upregulation of p57(kip2) and Rad9 in the PC-3M prostate cancer cell line.
Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
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Turmeric (Curcuma longa) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor properties. However, despite the progress in research with C. longa, there is still a big lacuna in the information on the active principles and their molecular targets. More particularly very little is known about the role of cell cycle genes p57(kip2) and Rad9 during chemoprevention by turmeric and its derivatives especially in prostate cancer cell lines.
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