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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Clinical Quality Improvement Curriculum for Faculty in an Academic Medical Center.
Am J Med Qual
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2014
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Interested faculty enrolled in this 6-month-long quality improvement (QI) course to facilitate independent QI project work. The course included monthly 1.5-hour sessions: 20-minute presentations covering key QI concepts, then small group activities to facilitate project work. Faculty were required to identify, construct, and implement an independent QI project. They met individually with mentors twice during the course, with additional guidance offered virtually via phone or e-mail, and completed pretests and posttests of QI knowledge (maximum score = 15) and self-assessed confidence. A statistically significant difference in knowledge (pre-course mean = 7.75, standard deviation [SD] = 3.06; post-course mean = 11.75, SD = 3.28; P = .02) and self-assessed confidence (pre mean = 3.08, SD = 0.65; post mean = 4.5, SD = 0.68; P < .0001) was found. Of 8 faculty, 5 were able to conduct small tests of change; 3 studied the current processes and planned to run tests of change. Positive responses to this course helped obtain buy-in from leadership to develop a leadership program in QI.
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Use of mobile tablet devices and reduction in time to perioperative transesophageal echocardiography reporting: a historical cohort study.
Can J Anaesth
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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Timely communication of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) findings to the postoperative care team is critical to optimizing patient care. We compared the use of a personal computer (PC) system with the use of a mobile tablet device (MTD) system for point-of-care TEE data entry and hypothesized that the MTD-based system would reduce the time to preliminary TEE reporting and decrease the incidence of delinquent reporting by 50%.
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Development and assessment of a web-based clinical quality improvement curriculum.
J Grad Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2014
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Understanding quality improvement (QI) is an important skill for physicians, yet educational interventions focused on teaching QI to residents are relatively rare. Web-based training may be an effective teaching tool in time-limited and expertise-limited settings.
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Educational interventions to improve recognition of delirium: a systematic review.
J Am Geriatr Soc
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2013
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Delirium is a common and serious condition that is underrecognized in older adults in a variety of healthcare settings. It is poorly recognized because of deficiencies in provider knowledge and its atypical presentation. Early recognition of delirium is warranted to better manage the disease and prevent the adverse outcomes associated with it. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerning educational interventions focusing on recognition of delirium. The Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINHAL) databases were searched for studies with specific educational focus in the recognition of delirium, and 26 studies with various designs were identified. The types of interventions used were classified according to the Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Constructs in Educational Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE) model, and outcomes were sorted according to Kirkpatricks hierarchy. Educational strategies combining predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors achieved better results than strategies that included one or two of these components. Studies using predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing strategies together were more often effective in producing changes in staff behavior and participant outcomes. Based on this review, improvements in knowledge and skill alone seem insufficient to favorably influence recognition of delirium. Educational interventions to recognize delirium are most effective when formal teaching is interactive and is combined with strategies including engaging leadership and using clinical pathways and assessment tools. The goal of the current study was to systematically review the published literature to determine the effect of educational interventions on recognition of delirium.
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Ensuring vitamin D supplementation in nursing home patients--a quality improvement project.
J Nutr Gerontol Geriatr
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Randomized controlled trials have shown that adequate vitamin D supplementation in nursing home (NH) residents reduces the rates of falls and fractures. In our NH, review of medication administration records of all patients (n = 101) revealed that only 34.6% of the patients were currently prescribed adequate doses of vitamin D, revealing a need for intervention. We designed a Quality Improvement (QI) project with the objective of improving the vitamin D prescription rate in our NH. We used the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to implement this QI project. Patients not currently prescribed an adequate dose of vitamin D were identified and started on a daily dose of 800 IU of vitamin D. Additionally, patients who were experiencing falls while on an adequate dose of vitamin D for 3 months were examined for the possibility of vitamin D deficiency and were started on 50,000 IU of vitamin D per week for 12 weeks if they were found to be vitamin D-deficient based on blood levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D below 30 ng/mL. We found that with several PDSA cycles over a period of 5 months, the prescription rate for vitamin D was increased to 86%, surpassing our initial goal of 80%. In conclusion, we found that a multidisciplinary QI program utilizing multiple PDSA cycles was effective in reaching target prescription rates for vitamin D supplementation in a population of NH patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.