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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2014
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Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.
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Macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns of leaf herbivory across vascular plants.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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The consumption of plants by animals underlies important evolutionary and ecological processes in nature. Arthropod herbivory evolved approximately 415 Ma and the ensuing coevolution between plants and herbivores is credited with generating much of the macroscopic diversity on the Earth. In contemporary ecosystems, herbivory provides the major conduit of energy from primary producers to consumers. Here, we show that when averaged across all major lineages of vascular plants, herbivores consume 5.3% of the leaf tissue produced annually by plants, whereas previous estimates are up to 3.8× higher. This result suggests that for many plant species, leaf herbivory may play a smaller role in energy and nutrient flow than currently thought. Comparative analyses of a diverse global sample of 1058 species across 2085 populations reveal that models of stabilizing selection best describe rates of leaf consumption, and that rates vary substantially within and among major plant lineages. A key determinant of this variation is plant growth form, where woody plant species experience 64% higher leaf herbivory than non-woody plants. Higher leaf herbivory in woody species supports a key prediction of the plant apparency theory. Our study provides insight into how a long history of coevolution has shaped the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and herbivores.
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The impact of domestication on resistance to two generalist herbivores across 29 independent domestication events.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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The domestication of crops is among the most important innovations in human history. Here, we test the hypothesis that cultivation and artificial selection for increased productivity of crops reduced plant defenses against herbivores. We compared the performance of two economically important generalist herbivores - the leaf-chewing beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) and the phloem-feeding green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - across 29 crop species and their closely related wild relatives. We also measured putative morphological and chemical defensive traits and correlated them with herbivore performance. We show that, on average, domestication significantly reduced resistance to S. exigua, but not M. persicae, and that most independent domestication events did not cause differences in resistance to either herbivore. In addition, we found that multiple plant traits predicted resistance to S. exigua and M. persicae, and that domestication frequently altered the strength and direction of correlations between these traits and herbivore performance. Our results show that domestication can alter plant defenses, but does not cause strong allocation tradeoffs as predicted by plant defense theory. These results have important implications for understanding the evolutionary ecology of species interactions and for the search for potential resistance traits to be targeted in crop breeding.
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Diverse viral glycoproteins as well as CD4 co-package into the same human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) particles.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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Retroviruses can acquire not only their own glycoproteins as they bud from the cellular membrane, but also some cellular and foreign viral glycoproteins. Many of these non-native glycoproteins are actively recruited to budding virions, particularly other viral glycoproteins. This observation suggests that there may be a conserved mechanism underlying the recruitment of glycoproteins into viruses. If a conserved mechanism is used, diverse glycoproteins should localize to a single budding retroviral particle. On the other hand, if viral glycoproteins have divergent mechanisms for recruitment, the different glycoproteins could segregate into different particles.
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Macroevolution of plant defenses against herbivores in the evening primroses.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Plant species vary greatly in defenses against herbivores, but existing theory has struggled to explain this variation. Here, we test how phylogenetic relatedness, tradeoffs, trait syndromes, and sexual reproduction affect the macroevolution of defense. To examine the macroevolution of defenses, we studied 26 Oenothera (Onagraceae) species, combining chemistry, comparative phylogenetics and experimental assays of resistance against generalist and specialist herbivores. We detected dozens of phenolic metabolites within leaves, including ellagitannins (ETs), flavonoids, and caffeic acid derivatives (CAs). The concentration and composition of phenolics exhibited low to moderate phylogenetic signal. There were clear negative correlations between multiple traits, supporting the prediction of allocation tradeoffs. There were also positively covarying suites of traits, but these suites did not strongly predict resistance to herbivores and thus did not act as defensive syndromes. By contrast, specific metabolites did correlate with the performance of generalist and specialist herbivores. Finally, that repeated losses of sex in Oenothera was associated with the evolution of increased flavonoid diversity and altered phenolic composition. These results show that secondary chemistry has evolved rapidly during the diversification of Oenothera. This evolution has been marked by allocation tradeoffs between traits, some of which are related to herbivore performance. The repeated loss of sex appears also to have constrained the evolution of plant secondary chemistry, which may help to explain variation in defense among plants.
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Recombination can lead to spurious results in retroviral transduction with dually fluorescent reporter genes.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2013
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Fluorescent proteins are routinely employed as reporters in retroviral vectors. Here, we demonstrate that transduction with retroviral vectors carrying a tandem-dimer Tomato (TdTom) reporter produces two distinct fluorescent cell populations following template jumping due to a single nucleotide polymorphism between the first and second Tomato genes. Template jumping also occurs between repeated sequences in the Tomato and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes. Thus, proper interpretation of the fluorescence intensity of transduced cells requires caution.
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Retrovirus glycoprotein functionality requires proper alignment of the ectodomain and the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic tail.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2013
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Nonnative viral glycoproteins, including Friend murine leukemia virus envelope (F-MLV Env) are actively recruited to HIV-1 assembly sites by an unknown mechanism. Because interactions with the lipid microenvironment at budding sites could contribute to recruitment, we examined the contribution of the hydrophobicity of the F-MLV Env membrane-spanning domain (MSD) to its incorporation into HIV-1 particles. A series of F-MLV Env mutants that added or deleted one, two, or three leucines in the MSD were constructed. All six mutants retained the ability to be incorporated into HIV-1 particles, but the -1L, -2L, -3L, +1L, and +2L mutants were not capable of producing infectious particles. Surprisingly, the +3L Env glycoprotein was able to produce infectious particles and was constitutively fusogenic. However, when the cytoplasmic tail domains (CTDs) in the Env constructs were deleted, all six of the MSD mutants were able to produce infectious particles. Further mutational analyses revealed that the first 10 amino acids of the CTD is a critical regulator of infectivity. A similar phenotype was observed in HIV-1 Env upon addition of leucines in the MSD, with +1 and +2 leucine mutations greatly reducing Env activity, but +3 leucine mutations behaving similar to the wild type. Unlike F-MLV Env (+1L and +2L), HIV-1 Env (+1L and +2L) infectivity was not restored by deletion of the CTD. We hypothesize that the CTD forms a coiled-coil that disrupts the proteins functionality if it is not in phase with the trimer interface of the ectodomain.
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Testing for coevolutionary diversification: linking pattern with process.
Trends Ecol. Evol. (Amst.)
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2013
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Coevolutionary diversification is cited as a major mechanism driving the evolution of diversity, particularly in plants and insects. However, tests of coevolutionary diversification have focused on elucidating macroevolutionary patterns rather than the processes giving rise to such patterns. Hence, there is weak evidence that coevolution promotes diversification. This is in part due to a lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which coevolution can cause speciation and the difficulty of integrating results across micro- and macroevolutionary scales. In this review, we highlight potential mechanisms of coevolutionary diversification, outline approaches to examine this process across temporal scales, and propose a set of minimal requirements for demonstrating coevolutionary diversification. Our aim is to stimulate research that tests more rigorously for coevolutionary diversification.
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Characterizing metal coordination environments in porous organic polymers: a joint density functional theory and experimental infrared spectroscopy study.
Chemistry
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Very POP right now! DFT computational analysis on the structural, energetic, and IR spectroscopic characteristics of a porous organic polymer support, [Ta(NMe2 )5 ] as a molecular precursor, and the catalytic material synthesized from these two components are presented and analyzed against recorded IR spectra of these systems. The analysis leads to unambiguous identification of the atomic structure of the POP-supported Ta-amide reaction center synthesized in the experiment.
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Contemporary evolution of plant growth rate following experimental removal of herbivores.
Am. Nat.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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Herbivores are credited with driving the evolutionary diversification of plant defensive strategies over macroevolutionary time. For this to be true, herbivores must also cause short-term evolution within plant populations, but few studies have experimentally tested this prediction. We addressed this gap using a long-term manipulative field experiment where exclosures protected 22 plant populations from natural rabbit herbivory for <1 to 26 years. We collected seeds of Rumex acetosa L. (Polygonaceae) from our plots and grew them in a common greenhouse environment to quantify evolved differences among populations in individual plant growth rate, tolerance to herbivory, competitive ability, and the concentration of secondary metabolites (tannins and oxalate) implicated in defense against herbivores. In 26 years without rabbit herbivory, plant growth rate decreased linearly by 30%. We argue that plant growth rate has evolved as a defense against intense rabbit herbivory. In contrast, we found no change in tolerance to herbivory or concentrations of secondary metabolites. We also found no change in competitive ability, suggesting that contemporary evolution may not feed back to alter ecological interactions within this plant community. Our results combined with those of other studies show that the evolution of gross morphological traits such as growth rate in response to herbivory may be common, which calls into question assumptions about some of the most popular theories of plant defense.
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Functional complementation of a model target to study Vpu sensitivity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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HIV-1 forms infectious particles with Murine Leukemia virus (MLV) Env, but not with the closely related Gibbon ape Leukemia Virus (GaLV) Env. We have determined that the incompatibility between HIV-1 and GaLV Env is primarily caused by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which prevents GaLV Env from being incorporated into particles. We have characterized the Vpu sensitivity sequence in the cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD) of GaLV Env using a chimeric MLV Env with the GaLV Env CTD (MLV/GaLV Env). Vpu sensitivity is dependent on an alpha helix with a positively charged face containing at least one Lysine. In the present study, we utilized functional complementation to address whether all the three helices in the CTD of an Env trimer have to contain the Vpu sensitivity motif for the trimer to be modulated by Vpu. Taking advantage of the functional complementation of the binding defective (D84K) and fusion defective (L493V) MLV and MLV/GaLV Env mutants, we were able to assay the activity of mixed trimers containing both MLV and GaLV CTDs. Mixed trimers containing both MLV and GaLV CTDs were functionally active and remained sensitive to Vpu. However, trimers containing an Env with the GaLV CTD and an Env with no CTD remained functional but were resistant to Vpu. Together these data suggest that the presence of at least one GaLV CTD is sufficient to make an Env trimer sensitive to Vpu, but only if it is part of a trimeric CTD complex.
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Sequences in gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope that confer sensitivity to HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
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HIV-1 efficiently forms pseudotyped particles with many gammaretrovirus glycoproteins, such as Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV) Env, but not with the related gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) Env or with a chimeric F-MLV Env with a GaLV cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). This incompatibility is modulated by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu. Because the GaLV Env CTD does not resemble tetherin or CD4, the well-studied targets of Vpu, we sought to characterize the modular sequence in the GaLV Env CTD required for this restriction in the presence of Vpu. Using a systematic mutagenesis scan, we determined that the motif that makes GaLV Env sensitive to Vpu is INxxIxxVKxxVxRxK. This region in the CTD of GaLV Env is predicted to form a helix. Mutations in the CTD that would break this helix abolish sensitivity to Vpu. Although many of these positions can be replaced with amino acids with similar biophysical properties without disrupting the Vpu sensitivity, the final lysine residue is required. This Vpu sensitivity sequence appears to be modular, as the unrelated Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Env can be made Vpu sensitive by replacing its CTD with the GaLV Env CTD. In addition, F-MLV Env can be made Vpu sensitive by mutating two amino acids in its cytoplasmic tail to make it resemble more closely the Vpu sensitivity motif. Surprisingly, the core components of this Vpu sensitivity sequence are also present in the host surface protein CD4, which is also targeted by Vpu through its CTD.
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Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2011
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We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (k(off)) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1.
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Loss of sexual recombination and segregation is associated with increased diversification in evening primroses.
Evolution
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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The loss of sexual recombination and segregation in asexual organisms has been portrayed as an irreversible process that commits asexually reproducing lineages to reduced diversification. We test this hypothesis by estimating rates of speciation, extinction, and transition between sexuality and functional asexuality in the evening primroses. Specifically, we estimate these rates using the recently developed BiSSE (Binary State Speciation and Extinction) phylogenetic comparative method, which employs maximum likelihood and Bayesian techniques. We infer that net diversification rates (speciation minus extinction) in functionally asexual evening primrose lineages are roughly eight times faster than diversification rates in sexual lineages, largely due to higher speciation rates in asexual lineages. We further reject the hypothesis that a loss of recombination and segregation is irreversible because the transition rate from functional asexuality to sexuality is significantly greater than zero and in fact exceeded the reverse rate. These results provide the first empirical evidence in support of the alternative theoretical prediction that asexual populations should instead diversify more rapidly than sexual populations because they are free from the homogenizing effects of sexual recombination and segregation. Although asexual reproduction may often constrain adaptive evolution, our results show that the loss of recombination and segregation need not be an evolutionary dead end in terms of diversification of lineages.
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Synthesis of molybdenum nitrido complexes for triple-bond metathesis of alkynes and nitriles.
Inorg Chem
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Complexes of the type N?Mo(OR)(3) (R = tertiary alkyl, tertiary silyl, bulky aryl) have been synthesized in the search for molybdenum-based nitrile-alkyne cross-metathesis (NACM) catalysts. Protonolysis of known N?Mo(NMe(2))(3) led to the formation of N?Mo(O-2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))(3)(NHMe(2)) (12), N?Mo(OSiPh(3))(3)(NHMe(2)) (5-NHMe(2)), and N?Mo(OCPh(2)Me)(3)(NHMe(2)) (17-NHMe(2)). The X-ray structure of 12 revealed an NHMe(2) ligand bound cis to the nitrido ligand, while 5-NHMe(2) possessed an NHMe(2) bound trans to the nitride ligand. Consequently, 17-NHMe(2) readily lost its amine ligand to form N?Mo(OCPh(2)Me)(3) (17), while 12 and 5-NHMe(2) retained their amine ligands in solution. Starting from bulkier tris-anilide complexes, N?Mo(N[R]Ar)(3) (R = isopropyl, tert-butyl; Ar = 3,5-dimethylphenyl) allowed for the formation of base-free complexes N?Mo(OSiPh(3))(3) (5) and N?Mo(OSiPh(2)(t)Bu)(3) (16). Achievement of a NACM cycle requires the nitride complex to react with alkynes to form alkylidyne complexes; therefore the alkyne cross-metathesis (ACM) activity of the complexes was tested. Complex 5 was found to be an efficient catalyst for the ACM of 1-phenyl-1-butyne at room temperature. Complexes 12 and 5-NHMe(2) were also active for ACM at 75 °C, while 17-NHMe(2) and 16 did not show ACM activity. Only 5 proved to be active for the NACM of anisonitrile, which is a reactive substrate in NACM catalyzed by tungsten. NACM with 5 required a reaction temperature of 180 °C in order to initiate the requisite alkylidyne-to-nitride conversion, with slightly more than two turnovers achieved prior to catalyst deactivation. Known molybdenum nitrido complexes were screened for NACM activity under similar conditions, and only N?Mo(OSiPh(3))(3)(py) (5-py) displayed any trace of NACM activity.
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Community genetics: what have we accomplished and where should we be going?
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
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Research in community genetics seeks to understand how the dynamic interplay between ecology and evolution shapes simple and complex communities and ecosystems. A community genetics perspective, however, may not be necessary or informative for all studies and systems. To better understand when and how intraspecific genetic variation and microevolution are important in community and ecosystem ecology, we suggest future research should focus on three areas: (i) determining the relative importance of intraspecific genetic variation compared with other ecological factors in mediating community and ecosystem properties; (ii) understanding the importance of microevolution in shaping ecological dynamics in multi-trophic communities; and (iii) deciphering the phenotypic and associated genetic mechanisms that drive community and ecosystem processes. Here, we identify key areas of research that will increase our understanding of the ecology and evolution of complex communities but that are currently missing in community genetics. We then suggest experiments designed to meet these current gaps.
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Mechanisms for Env glycoprotein acquisition by retroviruses.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
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A mandatory step in the formation of an infectious retroviral particle is the acquisition of its envelope glycoprotein (Env). This step invariably occurs by Env positioning itself in the host membrane at the location of viral budding and being incorporated along with the host membrane into the viral particle. In some ways, this step of the viral life cycle would appear to be imprecise. There is no specific sequence in Env or in the retroviral structural protein, Gag, that is inherently required for the production of an infectious Env-containing particle. Additionally, Env-defective proviruses can efficiently produce infectious particles with any of a number of foreign retroviral Env glycoproteins or even glycoproteins from unrelated viral families, a process termed pseudotyping. However, mounting evidence suggests that Env incorporation is neither passive nor random. Rather, several redundant mechanisms appear to contribute to the carefully controlled process of Env acquisition, many of which are apparently used by a wide variety of enveloped viruses. This review presents and discusses the evidence for these different mechanisms contributing to incorporation.
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Sequence conservation among orthologous vomeronasal type 1 receptor-like (ora) genes does not support the differential tuning hypothesis in Salmonidae.
Gene
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Salmon utilize olfactory cues to guide natal stream homing during spawning migrations. Both inorganic and biogenic chemicals have been proposed as odorants that might be used by salmon during homing. In this study, we used genomic DNA sequence data from nine salmonid species to compare nucleotide identities for orthologous main olfactory receptor (mOR) genes with nucleotide identities for orthologous vomeronasal type 1-like (ora) receptor genes. We found that orthologs for both classes of olfactory receptor genes (mORs and Oras) appear to be highly conserved among species. Our findings do not support the differential tuning hypothesis in Salmonidae, which predicts higher sequence conservation for mORs than ora. We did, however, find convincing evidence for site-specific positive selection acting on paralogous main olfactory receptor genes.
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Clathrin facilitates the morphogenesis of retrovirus particles.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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The morphogenesis of retroviral particles is driven by Gag and GagPol proteins that provide the major structural component and enzymatic activities required for particle assembly and maturation. In addition, a number of cellular proteins are found in retrovirus particles; some of these are important for viral replication, but many lack a known functional role. One such protein is clathrin, which is assumed to be passively incorporated into virions due to its abundance at the plasma membrane. We found that clathrin is not only exceptionally abundant in highly purified HIV-1 particles but is recruited with high specificity. In particular, the HIV-1 Pol protein was absolutely required for clathrin incorporation and point mutations in reverse transcriptase or integrase domains of Pol could abolish incorporation. Clathrin was also specifically incorporated into other retrovirus particles, including members of the lentivirus (simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac), gammaretrovirus (murine leukemia virus, MLV) and betaretrovirus (Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, M-PMV) genera. However, unlike HIV-1, these other retroviruses recruited clathrin primarily using peptide motifs in their respective Gag proteins that mimicked motifs found in cellular clathrin adaptors. Perturbation of clathrin incorporation into these retroviruses, via mutagenesis of viral proteins, siRNA based clathrin depletion or adaptor protein (AP180) induced clathrin sequestration, had a range of effects on the accuracy of particle morphogenesis. These effects varied according to which retrovirus was examined, and included Gag and/or Pol protein destabilization, inhibition of particle assembly and reduction in virion infectivity. For each retrovirus examined, clathrin incorporation appeared to be important for optimal replication. These data indicate that a number of retroviruses employ clathrin to facilitate the accurate morphogenesis of infectious particles. We propose a model in which clathrin contributes to the spatial organization of Gag and Pol proteins, and thereby regulates proteolytic processing of virion components during particle assembly.
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An LYPSL late domain in the gag protein contributes to the efficient release and replication of Rous sarcoma virus.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2010
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The efficient release of newly assembled retrovirus particles from the plasma membrane requires the recruitment of a network of cellular proteins (ESCRT machinery) normally involved in the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies and in cytokinesis. Retroviruses and other enveloped viruses recruit the ESCRT machinery through three classes of short amino acid consensus sequences termed late domains: PT/SAP, PPXY, and LYPX(n)L. The major late domain of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) has been mapped to a PPPY motif in Gag that binds members of the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases. RSV Gag also contains a second putative late domain motif, LYPSL, positioned 5 amino acids downstream of PPPY. LYPX(n)L motifs have been shown to support budding in other retroviruses by binding the ESCRT adaptor protein Alix. To investigate a possible role of the LYPSL motif in RSV budding, we constructed PPPY and LYPSL mutants in the context of an infectious virus and then analyzed the budding rates, spreading profiles, and budding morphology. The data imply that the LYPSL motif acts as a secondary late domain and that its role in budding is amplified in the absence of a fully functional PPPY motif. The LYPXL motif proved to be a stronger late domain when an aspartic acid was substituted for the native serine, recapitulating the properties of the LYPDL late domain of equine infectious anemia virus. The overexpression of human Alix in the absence of a fully functional PPPY late domain partially rescued both the viral budding rate and viral replication, supporting a model in which the RSV LYPSL motif mediates budding through an interaction with the ESCRT adaptor protein Alix.
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Two distinct mechanisms regulate recruitment of murine leukemia virus envelope protein to retroviral assembly sites.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2010
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The cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD) of retroviral envelope (Env) proteins has been implicated in modulating Env incorporation into viral particles. We generated a panel of murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env mutants and analyzed their ability to be recruited to human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) assembly sites. Surprisingly, the entire CTD was dispensable for recruitment to assembly sites, but a mutation that disrupted the furin cleavage site in Env abolished recruitment. To determine if MLV Env can show selectivity for homologous assembly sites, cells were co-transfected with both HIV-1 and MLV assembly components along with each MLV Env construct and assayed for infectious particle production. MLV Env selectively formed infectious particles with the MLV components at the expense of infectious HIV-1 infectious particle production, but truncation of the CTD progressively reduced this selectivity. Collectively these data suggest that there are two separable mechanisms that govern MLV Env recruitment to viral assembly sites.
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Effects of plant sex on range distributions and allocation to reproduction.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2010
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Despite an abundance of theory, few empirical studies have explored the ecological and evolutionary consequences of sex. We used a comparative phylogenetic approach to examine whether transitions between sexual and asexual reproduction are associated with changes in the size and distribution of species geographical ranges, and their investment in reproduction. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeny of the genus Oenothera sections Oenothera and Calylophus (Onagraceae), which contain 35 sexual and 30 functionally asexual species. From each species, we collected data on the geographical distribution and variation in plant traits related to reproduction. Functionally asexual species occurred at higher latitudes, but did not differ in range size, compared with sexual species. Transitions to asexuality were associated with decreased investment in floral structures, including the length of petals, floral tubes and styles. Decreased anther size and increased seed size within asexual species also suggest altered allocation to male and female fitness. The observed range shifts are consistent with superior colonization of environments by asexual species following glaciation, and the observed changes in reproductive allocation support predictions made by models relating to the evolution of selfing. Our results suggest that the evolutionary consequences of asexual reproduction might be less restrictive than previously thought.
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Pseudotyping incompatibility between HIV-1 and gibbon ape leukemia virus Env is modulated by Vpu.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2009
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The Env protein from gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) has been shown to be incompatible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the production of infectious pseudotyped particles. This incompatibility has been mapped to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of GaLV Env. Surprisingly, we found that the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu modulates this incompatibility. The infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env was not affected by Vpu. However, the infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with an MLV Env with the cytoplasmic tail from GaLV Env (MLV/GaLV Env) was restricted 50- to 100-fold by Vpu. A Vpu mutant containing a scrambled membrane-spanning domain, Vpu(RD), was still able to restrict MLV/GaLV Env, but mutation of the serine residues at positions 52 and 56 completely alleviated the restriction. Loss of infectivity appeared to be caused by reduced MLV/GaLV Env incorporation into viral particles. The mechanism of this downmodulation appears to be distinct from Vpu-mediated CD4 downmodulation because Vpu-expressing cells that failed to produce infectious HIV-1 particles nonetheless continued to display robust surface MLV/GaLV Env expression. In addition, if MLV and HIV-1 were simultaneously introduced into the same cells, only the HIV-1 particle infectivity was restricted by Vpu. Collectively, these data suggest that Vpu modulates the cellular distribution of MLV/GaLV Env, preventing its recruitment to HIV-1 budding sites.
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Plant sex and the evolution of plant defenses against herbivores.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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Despite the importance of plant-herbivore interactions to the ecology and evolution of terrestrial ecosystems, the evolutionary factors contributing to variation in plant defenses against herbivores remain unresolved. We used a comparative phylogenetic approach to examine a previously untested hypothesis (Recombination-Mating System Hypothesis) that posits that reduced sexual reproduction limits adaptive evolution of plant defenses against arthropod herbivores. To test this hypothesis we focused on the evening primrose family (Onagraceae), which includes both sexual and functionally asexual species. Ancestral state reconstructions on a 5-gene phylogeny of the family revealed between 18 and 21 independent transitions between sexual and asexual reproduction. Based on these analyses, we examined susceptibility to herbivores on 32 plant species representing 15 independent transitions. Generalist caterpillars consumed 32% more leaf tissue, gained 13% greater mass, and experienced 21% higher survival on functionally asexual than on sexual plant species. Survival of a generalist feeding mite was 19% higher on asexual species. In a field experiment, generalist herbivores consumed 64% more leaf tissue on asexual species. By contrast, a specialist beetle fed more on sexual than asexual species, suggesting that a tradeoff exists between the evolution of defense to generalist and specialist herbivores. Measures of putative plant defense traits indicate that both secondary compounds and physical leaf characteristics may mediate this tradeoff. These results support the Recombination-Mating System Hypothesis and suggest that variation in sexual reproduction among plant species may play an important, yet overlooked, role in shaping the macroevolution of plant defenses against arthropod herbivores.
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Interlocus variance of F(ST) provides evidence for directional selection over an olfactory receptor gene in Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) populations.
Mar Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2009
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Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) utilize olfactory cues to recognize and home to natal streams during spawning migrations. Chemically distinct river systems may promote directional selection for appropriately tuned olfactory receptor repertoires among Coho populations. Here, we use F(ST) outlier methods to test for a signal of selection over olfactory receptor gene-linked markers, characterized in Coho populations from four geographically proximate, but ecologically distinct rivers. We report evidence for directional selection over one such marker, OkiOR3001, and document substantially higher levels of genetic structure among Coho populations from Oregon coastal lakes than previously observed with putatively neutral microsatellites.
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Tetherin inhibits HIV-1 release by directly tethering virions to cells.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2009
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Tetherin is an interferon-induced protein whose expression blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viral particles. The underlying mechanism by which tetherin functions and whether it directly or indirectly causes virion retention are unknown. Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which tetherin exerts its antiviral activity. We demonstrate, through mutational analyses and domain replacement experiments, that tetherin configuration rather than primary sequence is critical for antiviral activity. These findings allowed the design of a completely artificial protein, lacking sequence homology with native tetherin, that nevertheless mimicked its antiviral activity. We further show that tetherin is incorporated into HIV-1 particles as a parallel homodimer using either of its two membrane anchors. These results indicate that tetherin functions autonomously and directly and that infiltration of virion envelopes by one or both of tetherins membrane anchors is necessary, and likely sufficient, to tether enveloped virus particles that bud through the plasma membrane.
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Evolution in plant populations as a driver of ecological changes in arthropod communities.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Heritable variation in traits can have wide-ranging impacts on species interactions, but the effects that ongoing evolution has on the temporal ecological dynamics of communities are not well understood. Here, we identify three conditions that, if experimentally satisfied, support the hypothesis that evolution by natural selection can drive ecological changes in communities. These conditions are: (i) a focal population exhibits genetic variation in a trait(s), (ii) there is measurable directional selection on the trait(s), and (iii) the trait(s) under selection affects variation in a community variable(s). When these conditions are met, we expect evolution by natural selection to cause ecological changes in the community. We tested these conditions in a field experiment examining the interactions between a native plant (Oenothera biennis) and its associated arthropod community (more than 90 spp.). Oenothera biennis exhibited genetic variation in several plant traits and there was directional selection on plant biomass, life-history strategy (annual versus biennial reproduction) and herbivore resistance. Genetically based variation in biomass and life-history strategy consistently affected the abundance of common arthropod species, total arthropod abundance and arthropod species richness. Using two modelling approaches, we show that evolution by natural selection in large O. biennis populations is predicted to cause changes in the abundance of individual arthropod species, increases in the total abundance of arthropods and a decline in the number of arthropod species. In small O. biennis populations, genetic drift is predicted to swamp out the effects of selection, making the evolution of plant populations unpredictable. In short, evolution by natural selection can play an important role in affecting the dynamics of communities, but these effects depend on several ecological factors. The framework presented here is general and can be applied to other systems to examine the community-level effects of ongoing evolution.
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Foreign glycoproteins can be actively recruited to virus assembly sites during pseudotyping.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2009
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Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites.
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Nef proteins from simian immunodeficiency viruses are tetherin antagonists.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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The tetherin/BST2/CD317 protein blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by inducing tethering of nascent particles to infected cell surfaces. The HIV-1 Vpu protein antagonizes the antiviral activity of human but not monkey tetherins and many simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) do not encode Vpu. Here, we show that the apparently "missing" antitetherin activity in SIVs has been acquired by several SIV Nef proteins. Specifically, SIV(MAC)/SIV(SMM), SIV(AGM), and SIV(BLU) Nef proteins can suppress tetherin activity. Notably, tetherin antagonism by SIV Nef proteins is species specific, is genetically separable from other Nef activities, and is most evident with simian rather than human tetherin proteins. Accordingly, a critical determinant of sensitivity to SIV(MAC) Nef in the tetherin cytoplasmic tail is variable in nonhuman primate tetherins and deleted in human tetherin, likely due to selective pressures imposed by viral antagonists, perhaps including Nef proteins.
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A field experiment demonstrating plant life-history evolution and its eco-evolutionary feedback to seed predator populations.
Am. Nat.
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The extent to which evolutionary change occurs in a predictable manner under field conditions and how evolutionary changes feed back to influence ecological dynamics are fundamental, yet unresolved, questions. To address these issues, we established eight replicate populations of native common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). Each population was planted with 18 genotypes in identical frequency. By tracking genotype frequencies with microsatellite DNA markers over the subsequent three years (up to three generations, ?5,000 genotyped plants), we show rapid and consistent evolution of two heritable plant life-history traits (shorter life span and later flowering time). This rapid evolution was only partially the result of differential seed production; genotypic variation in seed germination also contributed to the observed evolutionary response. Since evening primrose genotypes exhibited heritable variation for resistance to insect herbivores, which was related to flowering time, we predicted that evolutionary changes in genotype frequencies would feed back to influence populations of a seed predator moth that specializes on O. biennis. By the conclusion of the experiment, variation in the genotypic composition among our eight replicate field populations was highly predictive of moth abundance. These results demonstrate how rapid evolution in field populations of a native plant can influence ecological interactions.
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Vpu downmodulates two distinct targets, tetherin and gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope, through shared features in the Vpu cytoplasmic tail.
PLoS ONE
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During human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) assembly, the host proteins CD4 (the HIV-1 receptor) and tetherin (an interferon stimulated anti-viral protein) both reduce viral fitness. The HIV-1 accessory gene Vpu counteracts both of these proteins, but it is thought to do so through two distinct mechanisms. Modulation of CD4 likely occurs through proteasomal degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum. The exact mechanism of tetherin modulation is less clear, with possible roles for degradation and alteration of protein transport to the plasma membrane. Most investigations of Vpu function have used different assays for CD4 and tetherin. In addition, many of these investigations used exogenously expressed Vpu, which could result in variable expression levels. Thus, few studies have investigated these two Vpu functions in parallel assays, making direct comparisons difficult. Here, we present results from a rapid assay used to simultaneously investigate Vpu-targeting of both tetherin and a viral glycoprotein, gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope (GaLV Env). We previously reported that Vpu modulates GaLV Env and prevents its incorporation into HIV-1 particles through a recognition motif similar to that found in CD4. Using this assay, we performed a comprehensive mutagenic scan of Vpu in its native proviral context to identify features required for both types of activity. We observed considerable overlap in the Vpu sequences required to modulate tetherin and GaLV Env. We found that features in the cytoplasmic tail of Vpu, specifically within the cytoplasmic tail hinge region, were required for modulation of both tetherin and GaLV Env. Interestingly, these same regions features have been determined to be critical for CD4 downmodulation. We also observed a role for the transmembrane domain in the restriction of tetherin, as previously reported, but not of GaLV Env. We propose that Vpu may target both proteins in a mechanistically similar manner, albeit in different cellular locations.
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Evaluating methods for isolating total RNA and predicting the success of sequencing phylogenetically diverse plant transcriptomes.
PLoS ONE
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Next-generation sequencing plays a central role in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Although numerous metrics are purported to quantify the quality of RNA, there have been no large-scale empirical evaluations of the major determinants of sequencing success. We used a combination of existing and newly developed methods to isolate total RNA from 1115 samples from 695 plant species in 324 families, which represents >900 million years of phylogenetic diversity from green algae through flowering plants, including many plants of economic importance. We then sequenced 629 of these samples on Illumina GAIIx and HiSeq platforms and performed a large comparative analysis to identify predictors of RNA quality and the diversity of putative genes (scaffolds) expressed within samples. Tissue types (e.g., leaf vs. flower) varied in RNA quality, sequencing depth and the number of scaffolds. Tissue age also influenced RNA quality but not the number of scaffolds ? 1000 bp. Overall, 36% of the variation in the number of scaffolds was explained by metrics of RNA integrity (RIN score), RNA purity (OD 260/230), sequencing platform (GAIIx vs HiSeq) and the amount of total RNA used for sequencing. However, our results show that the most commonly used measures of RNA quality (e.g., RIN) are weak predictors of the number of scaffolds because Illumina sequencing is robust to variation in RNA quality. These results provide novel insight into the methods that are most important in isolating high quality RNA for sequencing and assembling plant transcriptomes. The methods and recommendations provided here could increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of RNA sequencing for individual labs and genome centers.
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Multiple Gag domains contribute to selective recruitment of murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env to MLV virions.
J. Virol.
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Retroviruses, like all enveloped viruses, must incorporate viral glycoproteins to form infectious particles. Interactions between the glycoprotein cytoplasmic tail and the matrix domain of Gag are thought to direct recruitment of glycoproteins to native virions for many retroviruses. However, retroviruses can also incorporate glycoproteins from other viruses to form infectious virions known as pseudotyped particles. The glycoprotein murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env can readily form pseudotyped particles with many retroviruses, suggesting a generic mechanism for recruitment. Here, we sought to identify which components of Gag, particularly the matrix domain, contribute to recruitment of MLV Env into retroviral particles. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the matrix domain of HIV-1 Gag is dispensable for generic recruitment, since it could be replaced with a nonviral membrane-binding domain without blocking active incorporation of MLV Env into HIV virions. However, MLV Env preferentially assembles with MLV virions. When MLV and HIV particles are produced from the same cell, MLV Env is packaged almost exclusively by MLV particles, thus preventing incorporation into HIV particles. Surprisingly, the matrix domain of MLV Gag is not required for this selectivity, since MLV Gag containing the matrix domain from HIV is still able to outcompete HIV particles for MLV Env. Although MLV Gag is sufficient for selective incorporation to occur, no single Gag domain dictates the selectivity. Our findings indicate that Env recruitment is more complex than previously believed and that Gag assembly/budding sites have fundamental properties that affect glycoprotein incorporation.
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Insect herbivores drive real-time ecological and evolutionary change in plant populations.
Science
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Insect herbivores are hypothesized to be major factors affecting the ecology and evolution of plants. We tested this prediction by suppressing insects in replicated field populations of a native plant, Oenothera biennis, which reduced seed predation, altered interspecific competitive dynamics, and resulted in rapid evolutionary divergence. Comparative genotyping and phenotyping of nearly 12,000 O. biennis individuals revealed that in plots protected from insects, resistance to herbivores declined through time owing to changes in flowering time and lower defensive ellagitannins in fruits, whereas plant competitive ability increased. This independent real-time evolution of plant resistance and competitive ability in the field resulted from the relaxation of direct selective effects of insects on plant defense and through indirect effects due to reduced herbivory on plant competitors.
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Robust suppression of HIV replication by intracellularly expressed reverse transcriptase aptamers is independent of ribozyme processing.
Mol. Ther.
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RNA aptamers that bind human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) also inhibit viral replication, making them attractive as therapeutic candidates and potential tools for dissecting viral pathogenesis. However, it is not well understood how aptamer-expression context and cellular RNA pathways govern aptamer accumulation and net antiviral bioactivity. Using a previously-described expression cassette in which aptamers were flanked by two "minimal core" hammerhead ribozymes, we observed only weak suppression of pseudotyped HIV. To evaluate the importance of the minimal ribozymes, we replaced them with extended, tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozymes with enhanced self-cleavage activity, in addition to noncleaving ribozymes with active site mutations. Both the active and inactive versions of the extended hammerhead ribozymes increased inhibition of pseudotyped virus, indicating that processing is not necessary for bioactivity. Clonal stable cell lines expressing aptamers from these modified constructs strongly suppressed infectious virus, and were more effective than minimal ribozymes at high viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Tertiary stabilization greatly increased aptamer accumulation in viral and subcellular compartments, again regardless of self-cleavage capability. We therefore propose that the increased accumulation is responsible for increased suppression, that the bioactive form of the aptamer is one of the uncleaved or partially cleaved transcripts, and that tertiary stabilization increases transcript stability by reducing exonuclease degradation.
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Adaptive evolution in ecological communities.
PLoS Biol.
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Understanding how natural selection drives evolution is a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most studies of adaptation focus on how a single environmental factor, such as increased temperature, affects evolution within a single species. The biological relevance of these experiments is limited because nature is infinitely more complex. Most species are embedded within communities containing many species that interact with one another and the physical environment. To understand the evolutionary significance of such ecological complexity, experiments must test the evolutionary impact of interactions among multiple species during adaptation. Here we highlight an experiment that manipulates species composition and tracks evolutionary responses within each species, while testing for the mechanisms by which species interact and adapt to their environment. We also discuss limitations of previous studies of adaptive evolution and emphasize how an experimental evolution approach can circumvent such shortcomings. Understanding how community composition acts as a selective force will improve our ability to predict how species adapt to natural and human-induced environmental change.
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CRM1-dependent trafficking of retroviral Gag proteins revisited.
J. Virol.
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We analyzed the nuclear trafficking ability of Gag proteins from six retroviral genera. Contrary to a previous report, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag showed no propensity to cycle through the nucleus. The only Gag protein that displayed CRM1-dependent nuclear cycling was that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). Surprisingly, this cycling could be eliminated without compromising infectivity by replacing the RSV Gag N-terminal matrix (MA) domain with HIV MA.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.