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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Recommendations for the use of Hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors for the treatment of chronic Hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons. A position paper of the Italian Association for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Disease.
New Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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The efficacy data obtained with boceprevir and telaprevir for persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection raise the question of whether HCV protease inhibitors should be used in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV co-infected persons. The Italian Association for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases has made these recommendations to provide the rationale and practical indications for the use of triple anti-HCV therapy in persons living with HIV (PLWHIV). A Writing Committee of experts indicated by the President of the Association and a Consulting Committee con- tributed to the document. The final draft was submitted to the evaluation of external experts and the text modified according to their suggestions and comments. Treatment of HCV co-infection should be considered for all HCV RNA positive PLWHIV. Response-guided therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin is the standard treatment of PLWHIV with infection by HCV genotype 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Boceprevir and telaprevir should be used to treat HCV genotype 1 infection in HIV/HCV co-infected patients for 48 weeks on an individual basis, with close monitoring of their efficacy and tolerability with concur- rent antiretroviral therapy, taking into account potential drug-drug interactions. The decision to treat a patient or to wait for better treatment options, or to discontinue treatment should be made on an individual basis taking into account pre-treatment variables and the on-treatment HCV RNA kinetics.
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Multicenter italian experience in liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-infected patients.
Oncologist
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2013
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The aim of our work is to assess the clinical outcomes of liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in HIV-coinfected patients. This is a multicenter study involving three Italian transplant centers in northern Italy: University of Modena, University of Bologna, and University of Udine.
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Anal cancer: Focus on HIV-positive patients in the HAART-era.
Curr. HIV Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2011
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Anal cancer represents an increasing health problem, especially in immune-compromised patients, as HIV-positive patients. Notably, a significant higher incidence rate is reported among HIV infected patients with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To date, no randomised trial supports the correlation between existing screening strategies and reduced progression of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal cancer or improved survival. Nevertheless, screening and treatment of AIN by topical agents should be implemented in high risk population. Data on invasive anal cancer treatment show that combined modality treatment (CMT) is the treatment of choice. Early reports on HIV-positive patients describe higher treatment toxicity and a relation with lower CD4 count and higher HIV viral load. More recently, reported outcomes seem to be similar in HIV-positive population and general population. Reports on a rise in local recurrence rates and in acute side effects along with a correlation with pre-treatment CD4 counts in HIV-positive patients, are not confirmed by all authors. The development of the first approved vaccine is a milestone in the field of anogenital cancers. However, many questions are still unresolved especially as concerns immunization in the setting of HIV infection.
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HIV-infected patients and liver transplantation: who, when and why.
Curr. HIV Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Well into the 25th year of the HIV pandemics, and into the 15th year of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, liver transplantation (LT) in the HIV population might be viewed as both a problem and an opportunity. It is still a problem when we consider that only a small proportion of all HIV-infected patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) will have access to this precious and limited resource. But, in the face of the continuous HAART refinements, that will probably expand in the future the pool of potential HIV- organ recipients, LT is also an opportunity. Considering the poor results observed in a subset of HIV/HCV coinfected patients with an ESLD in comparison to HCV monoinfected ones, LT is still a problem. But it is an opportunity if large and well designed clinical trials will reveal favourable prognostic factors associated to the subset of HIV/HCV coinfected patients that may undergo LT with satisfactory results. Available data presently support with good evidence the practice of LT in HIV population. Thus, the issue is no longer "whether it is correct to transplant HIV-infected patients", but "who are the patients that can be safely transplanted" and "when is the most correct timing to perform the surgical procedure". Indeed, the benefits of LT in HIV-infected patients, especially in terms of mid- and long-term patient and graft survival, are strictly related to patient selection and correct timing for transplantation. Aim of this article is to review some of the issues concerning HIV infection and LT, particularly with regard the opportunity of LT option in HIV setting and the most appropriate evaluation of an HIV-infected candidate for LT.
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Biliary penetration and pharmacodynamic exposure of linezolid in liver transplant patients.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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The aim of the study was to assess the biliary penetration of linezolid and the probabilities of attaining optimal pharmacodynamic exposure against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in the bile of liver transplant (LTx) patients who received linezolid for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive hospital infections.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.