JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Recommendations for Donor HLA Assessment and Matching for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Consensus Opinion of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN).
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network conducts large, multi-institutional clinical trials with the goal of improving the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with life-threatening disorders. Well designed HCT trials benefit from standardized criteria for defining diagnoses, treatment plans and graft source selection. In this perspective, we summarize evidence supporting criteria for the selection of related and unrelated adult volunteer progenitor cell donors or umbilical cord blood units. These standardized criteria for graft source selection have been adopted by the BMT CTN to enhance the interpretation of clinical findings within and among future clinical protocols.
Related JoVE Video
Phase III clinical trial steroids/mycophenolate mofetil vs steroids/placebo as therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease: BMT CTN 0802.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Corticosteroids are the accepted primary therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), but durable responses are seen in only about half the patients. BMT-CTN 0802, a phase III multi-center randomized double blinded trial, was designed to test whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) plus corticosteroids was superior to corticosteroids alone as initial therapy for acute GvHD. Patients with newly diagnosed acute GvHD were eligible if required systemic therapy. Patients were randomized to receive prednisone with either MMF or placebo. The primary endpoint was acute or chronic GvHD-free survival at day 56 after initiation of therapy. A futility rule for GvHD free survival at day 56 was met at a planned interim analysis after 235 eligible patients (out of 372) were enrolled: 116 to MMF, 119 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between treatment groups including grade and organ distribution of GvHD. GvHD free survival at day 56, cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD at 12 months, overall survival, EBV reactivation, cumulative incidence of severe, life threatening infections, cumulative incidence of relapse at 12 months, quality of severe infections were similar. The addition of MMF to corticosteroids as initial therapy of acute GvHD does not improve GvHD-free survival compared with treatment with corticosteroids alone. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01002742.
Related JoVE Video
Plerixafor and Abbreviated-Course Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Mobilizing Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Light Chain Amyloidosis.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cytokine-based mobilization in light chain (AL) amyloidosis is frequently complicated by fluid overload, weight gain, cardiac arrhythmias, and peri-mobilization mortality. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) mobilization outcomes in 49 consecutive AL amyloidosis patients at our institution between 2004 and 2013 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G) (10 ?g/kg/day) (n = 25) versus an institutional protocol to limit G exposure using plerixafor (P) (.24 mg/kg s.c. starting day 3 of G 10 ?g/kg) (n = 24). G+P strategy yielded higher total CD34(+) cells/kg (12.8 × 10(6) versus 6.3 × 10(6); P < .001) and CD34(+) cells/kg collected on day 1 (10.8 × 10(6) versus 4.9 × 10(6), P = .004) compared with the G cohort. More G+P patients collected ?5 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (22 versus 16, P = .02) and ? 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (13 versus 5, P = .01). Four patients (16%) had mobilization failure with G; none with G+P. Peri-mobilization weight gain was lower with G+P strategy (median weight gain 1 versus 7 pounds, P = .009). Numbers of apheresis sessions (median, 1 versus 1, P = .52), number of hospitalization days (median, 1.1 versus 1.6, P = .52), transfusions, use of intravenous antibiotics, and cardiac arrhythmias were similar. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that upfront use of G+P as a mobilization strategy results in superior HPC collection, no mobilization failures, and less weight gain than G alone.
Related JoVE Video
Tacrolimus/sirolimus vs tacrolimus/methotrexate as GVHD prophylaxis after matched, related donor allogeneic HCT.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Grades 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs in approximately 35% of matched, related donor (MRD) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. We sought to determine if the combination of tacrolimus and sirolimus (Tac/Sir) was more effective than tacrolimus and methotrexate (Tac/Mtx) in preventing acute GVHD and early mortality after allogeneic MRD HCT in a phase 3, multicenter trial. The primary end point of the trial was to compare 114-day grades 2-4 acute GVHD-free survival using an intention-to-treat analysis of 304 randomized subjects. There was no difference in the probability of day 114 grades 2-4 acute GVHD-free survival (67% vs 62%, P = .38). Grades 2-4 GVHD was similar in the Tac/Sir and Tac/Mtx arms (26% vs 34%, P = .48). Neutrophil and platelet engraftment were more rapid in the Tac/Sir arm (14 vs 16 days, P < .001; 16 vs 19 days, P = .03). Oropharyngeal mucositis was less severe in the Tac/Sir arm (peak Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale score 0.70 vs 0.96, P < .001), but otherwise toxicity was similar. Chronic GVHD, relapse-free survival, and overall survival at 2 years were no different between study arms (53% vs 45%, P = .06; 53% vs 54%, P = .77; and 59% vs 63%, P = .36). Based on similar long-term outcomes, more rapid engraftment, and less oropharyngeal mucositis, the combination of Tac/Sir is an acceptable alternative to Tac/Mtx after MRD HCT. This study was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Cancer Institute; and the trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00406393.
Related JoVE Video
Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need.
Related JoVE Video
Effect of body mass in children with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The rising incidence of pediatric obesity may significantly affect bone marrow transplantation (BMT) outcomes. We analyzed outcomes in 3687 children worldwide who received cyclophosphamide-based BMT regimens for leukemias between 1990 and 2007. Recipients were classified according to age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles as underweight (UW), at risk of UW (RUW), normal, overweight (OW), or obese (OB). Median age and race were similar in all groups. Sixty-one percent of OB children were from the United States/Canada. Three-year relapse-free and overall survival ranged from 48% to 52% (P = .54) and 55% to 58% (P = .81) across BMI groups. Three-year leukemia relapses were 33%, 33%, 29%, 25%, and 21% in the UW, RUW, normal, OW, and OB groups, respectively (P < .001). Corresponding cumulative incidences for transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18%, 19%, 21%, 22%, and 28% (P < .01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a decreased risk of relapse compared with normal BMI (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; P < .01) and a trend toward higher TRM (RR = 1.28; P = .014). BMI in children is not significantly associated with different survival after BMT for hematologic malignancies. Obese children experience less relapse posttransplant compared with children with normal BMI; however, this benefit is offset by excess in TRM.
Related JoVE Video
Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions.
World J Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion.
Related JoVE Video
Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach.
Related JoVE Video
The ASH Choosing Wisely(R) campaign: five hematologic tests and treatments to question.
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Choosing Wisely® is a medical stewardship and quality improvement initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with leading medical societies in the United States. The ASH is an active participant in the Choosing Wisely® project. Using an iterative process and an evidence-based method, ASH has identified 5 tests and treatments that in some circumstances are not well supported by evidence and which in certain cases involve a risk of adverse events and financial costs with low likelihood of benefit. The ASH Choosing Wisely® recommendations focus on avoiding liberal RBC transfusion, avoiding thrombophilia testing in adults in the setting of transient major thrombosis risk factors, avoiding inferior vena cava filter usage except in specified circumstances, avoiding the use of plasma or prothrombin complex concentrate in the nonemergent reversal of vitamin K antagonists, and limiting routine computed tomography surveillance after curative-intent treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We recommend that clinicians carefully consider anticipated benefits of the identified tests and treatments before performing them.
Related JoVE Video
The ASH Choosing Wisely(R) campaign: five hematologic tests and treatments to question.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-04-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Choosing Wisely(®) is a medical stewardship and quality improvement initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with leading medical societies in the United States. The ASH is an active participant in the Choosing Wisely(®) project. Using an iterative process and an evidence-based method, ASH has identified 5 tests and treatments that in some circumstances are not well supported by evidence and which in certain cases involve a risk of adverse events and financial costs with low likelihood of benefit. The ASH Choosing Wisely(®) recommendations focus on avoiding liberal RBC transfusion, avoiding thrombophilia testing in adults in the setting of transient major thrombosis risk factors, avoiding inferior vena cava filter usage except in specified circumstances, avoiding the use of plasma or prothrombin complex concentrate in the nonemergent reversal of vitamin K antagonists, and limiting routine computed tomography surveillance after curative-intent treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We recommend that clinicians carefully consider anticipated benefits of the identified tests and treatments before performing them.
Related JoVE Video
Prospective cohort study comparing intravenous busulfan to total body irradiation in hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We conducted a prospective cohort study testing the noninferiority of survival of ablative intravenous busulfan (IV-BU) vs ablative total body irradiation (TBI)-based regimens in myeloid malignancies. A total of 1483 patients undergoing transplantation for myeloid malignancies (IV-BU, N = 1025; TBI, N = 458) were enrolled. Cohorts were similar with respect to age, gender, race, performance score, disease, and disease stage at transplantation. Most patients had acute myeloid leukemia (68% IV-BU, 78% TBI). Grafts were primarily peripheral blood (77%) from HLA-matched siblings (40%) or well-matched unrelated donors (48%). Two-year probabilities of survival (95% confidence interval [CI]), were 56% (95% CI, 53%-60%) and 48% (95% CI, 43%-54%, P = .019) for IV-BU (relative risk, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.98, P = .03) and TBI, respectively. Corresponding incidences of transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18% (95% CI, 16%-21%) and 19% (95% CI, 15%-23%, P = .75) and disease progression were 34% (95% CI, 31%-37%) and 39% (95% CI, 34%-44%, P = .08). The incidence of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) was 5% for IV-BU and 1% with TBI (P < .001). There were no differences in progression-free survival and graft-versus-host disease. Compared with TBI, IV-BU resulted in superior survival with no increased risk for relapse or TRM. These results support the use of myeloablative IV-BU vs TBI-based conditioning regimens for treatment of myeloid malignancies.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Comorbidity Index is predictive of survival after Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) but is associated with morbidity and non-relapse mortality (NRM). Hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was shown to predict risk of NRM and survival after allogeneic transplantation. We tested the utility of HCT-CI as a predictor of NRM and survival in patients with MM undergoing AHCT.
Related JoVE Video
Divergent effects of novel immunomodulatory agents and cyclophosphamide on the risk of engraftment syndrome after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Engraftment syndrome (ES) is an increasingly observed and occasionally fatal complication after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). In this study, we demonstrate that the incidence of ES is significantly increased in patients undergoing autologous PBSCT for multiple myeloma in comparison to patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that age > 60 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 2.62; P = .013) and transplantation for multiple myeloma (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.60 to 4.90; P = .0003) were associated with an increased risk of this complication. When stratified for myeloma patients only, age > 60 (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.87; P = .013) and prior treatment with both lenalidomide and bortezomib (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.11 to 3.04; P = .0001) were associated with an increased incidence of ES. Conversely, lack of exposure to cyclophosphamide from either chemomobilization or as a component of the pretransplantation therapeutic regimen increased the risk of this complication (HR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.91 to 4.87; P <.0001). These studies demonstrate that the pretransplantation exposure of multiple myeloma patients to novel immunomodulatory agents and cyclophosphamide significantly affects the subsequent risk of developing ES.
Related JoVE Video
Quantitative and qualitative differences in use and trends of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a Global Observational Study.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fifty-five years after publication of the first hematopoietic stem cell transplantation this technique has become an accepted treatment option for defined hematologic and non-hematologic disorders. There is considerable interest in understanding differences in its use and trends on a global level and the macro-economic factors associated with these differences. Data on the numbers of hematopoietic stem cell transplants performed in the 3-year period 2006-2008 were obtained from Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation member registries and from transplant centers in countries without registries. Population and macro-economic data were collected from the World Bank and from the International Monetary Fund. Transplant rates were analyzed by indication, donor type, country, and World Health Organization regional offices areas and related to selected health care indicators using single and multiple linear regression analyses. Data from a total of 146,808 patients were reported by 1,411 teams from 72 countries over five continents. The annual number of transplants increased worldwide with the highest relative increase in the Asia Pacific region. Transplant rates increased preferentially in high income countries (P=0.02), not in low or medium income countries. Allogeneic transplants increased for myelodysplasia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute leukemias, and non-malignant diseases but decreased for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Autologous transplants increased for autoimmune and lymphoproliferative diseases but decreased for leukemias and solid tumors. Transplant rates (P<0.01), donor type (P<0.01) aand disease indications (P<0.01) differed significantly between countries and regions. Transplant rates were associated with Gross National Income/capita (P<0.01) but showed a wide variation of explanatory content by donor type, disease indication and World Health Organization region. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation activity is increasing worldwide. The preferential increase in high income countries, the widening gap between low and high income countries and the significant regional differences suggest that different strategies are required in individual countries to foster hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an efficient and cost-effective treatment modality.
Related JoVE Video
Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation followed by allogeneic or autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma (BMT CTN 0102): a phase 3 biological assignment trial.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma, but disease progression remains an issue. Allogeneic HSCT might reduce disease progression, but can be associated with high treatment-related mortality. Thus, we aimed to assess effectiveness of allogeneic HSCT with non-myeloablative conditioning after autologous HSCT compared with tandem autologous HSCT.
Related JoVE Video
Characteristics of CliniMACS® System CD34-enriched T cell-depleted grafts in a multicenter trial for acute myeloid leukemia-Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) protocol 0303.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Eight centers participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) protocol 0303 to determine the effect of extensive T cell depletion (TCD) on the outcome of HLA matched sibling donor transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. One goal of the study was to determine if TCD could be performed uniformly among study sites. TCD was achieved using the CliniMACS(®) CD34 Reagent System for CD34 enrichment. Processed grafts needed to contain ? 2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+)cells/kg with a target of 5.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg and <10(5) CD3(+) T cells/kg. Up to 3 collections were allowed to achieve the minimum CD34(+) cell dose. In total, 86 products were processed for 44 patients. Differences in the starting cell products between centers were seen in regard to total nucleated cells, CD34(+) cells, and CD3(+) T cells, which could in part be ascribed to a higher dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor used for mobilization early in the trial. Differences between centers in processing outcomes were minimal and could be ascribed to starting cell parameters or to differences in graft analysis methods. Multivariate analysis showed that CD34(+) cell recovery (66.1% ± 20.3%) was inversely associated with the starting number of CD34(+) cells (P = .02). Median purity of the CD34 enriched fraction was 96.7% (61.5%-99.8%) with monocytes and B cells the most common impurity. All patients received the minimum CD34(+) cell dose, and 39 patients (89%) came within 10% or exceeded the target CD34(+) cell dose without exceeding the maximum T cell dose. All patients proceeded to transplantation and all achieved initial engraftment. Products processed at multiple centers using the CliniMACS System for CD34 enrichment were comparably and uniformly highly enriched for CD34(+) cells, with good CD34(+) cell recovery and very low CD3(+) T cell content.
Related JoVE Video
Tocilizumab for the treatment of steroid refractory graft-versus-host disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Corticosteroid refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the major challenges in the management of allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Although numerous agents have been employed to treat this patient population, no standardized second-line therapy exists. In this study, we report our experience with the administration of tocilizumab, an anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody, in the treatment of steroid refractory GVHD. Tocilizumab was administered to 8 patients with refractory acute (n = 6) or chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (n = 2) once every 3 to 4 weeks. The majority of patients with acute GVHD (aGVHD) had grade IV organ involvement of the skin or gastrointestinal tract, whereas both patients with cGVHD had long-standing severe skin sclerosis at the time of treatment. There were no allergic or infusion-related adverse events. Treatment was discontinued in one patient over concerns that tocilizumab may have worsened preexisting hyperbilirubinemia. Several patients also had transient elevations in serum transaminase values. Infections were the primary adverse events associated with tocilizumab administration. Four patients (67%) with aGVHD had either partial or complete responses apparent within the first 56 days of therapy. One patient with cGVHD had a significant response to therapy, whereas the second had stabilization of disease that allowed for a modest reduction in immune suppressive medications. These results indicate that tocilizumab has activity in the treatment of steroid refractory GVHD and warrants further investigation as a therapeutic option for this disorder.
Related JoVE Video
Low risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and relapse associated with T cell-depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission: results of the blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network prot
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is most effectively prevented by ex vivo T cell depletion (TCD) of the allograft, but its role in the treatment of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) remains unclear. We performed a phase 2 single-arm multicenter study to evaluate the role of TCD in AML patients in CR1 or CR2 up to age 65 years. The primary objective was to achieve a disease-free survival (DFS) rate of >75% at 6 months posttransplantation. A total of 44 patients with AML in CR1 (n = 37) or CR2 (n = 7) with a median age of 48.5 years (range, 21-59 years) received myeloablative chemotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (1375 cGy) followed by immunomagnetically selected CD34-enriched, T cell?depleted allografts from HLA-identical siblings. No pharmacologic GVHD prophylaxis was given. All patients engrafted. The incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV was 22.7%, and the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was 6.8% at 24 months. The relapse rate for patients in CR1 was 17.4% at 36 months. With a median follow-up of 34 months, DFS for all patients was 82% at 6 months, and DFS for patients in CR1 was 72.8% at 12 months and 58% at 36 months. HCT after myeloablative chemoradiotherapy can be performed in a multicenter setting using a uniform method of TCD, resulting in a low risk of extensive chronic GVHD and relapse for patients with AML in CR1.
Related JoVE Video
Trends of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the Eastern Mediterranean region, 1984-2007.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) activity was surveyed in the 9 countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean region that reported transplantation activity. Between the years of 1984 and 2007, 7933 transplantations were performed. The number of HSCTs per year has continued to increase, with a plateau in allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) between 2005 and 2007. Overall, a greater proportion of transplantations were allo-HSCT (n = 5761, 77%) compared with autologous HSCT (ASCT) (n = 2172, 23%). Of 5761 allo-HSCT, acute leukemia constituted the main indication (n = 2124, 37%). There was a significant proportion of allo-HSCT for bone marrow failures (n = 1001, 17%) and hemoglobinopathies (n = 885, 15%). The rate of unrelated donor transplantations remained low, with only 2 matched unrelated donor allo-HSCTs reported. One hundred umbilical cord blood transplantations were reported (0.017% of allo-HSCT). Peripheral blood stem cells were the main source of graft in allo-HSCT, and peripheral blood stem cells increasingly constitute the main source of hematopoietic stem cells overall. Reduced-intensity conditioning was utilized in 5.7% of allografts over the surveyed period. ASCT numbers continue to increase. There has been a shift in the indication for ASCT from acute leukemia to lymphoproliferative disorders (45%), followed by myeloma (26%). The survey reflects transplantation activity according to the unique health settings of this region. Notable differences in transplantation practices as reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation over recent years are highlighted.
Related JoVE Video
Childhood obesity and outcomes after bone marrow transplantation for patients with severe aplastic anemia.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The prevalence of obesity in the pediatric population has increased in the last 2 decades and represents a serious health concern, with potential impact on outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied the effect of weight by age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentile in 1,281 pediatric patients (age 2-19 years) with severe aplastic anemia who underwent HCT between 1990 and 2005. The study population was divided into 5 weight groups-underweight, risk of underweight, normal BMI range, risk of overweight, and overweight-according to age-adjusted BMI percentiles. Cox proportional hazards regression models for survival and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), performed using weight groups as the main effect and the normal BMI range (26th-75th percentile) as the baseline comparison, found higher mortality among overweight children (>95th percentile adjusted for age). Weight at transplantation did not increase the adjusted risk of grade III-IV aGVHD. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival rates were 60% and 59% for overweight children, compared with >70% in children with lower BMI at both time points (P < .001). Other significant factors associated with survival included race and region, donor type, conditioning regimens in related donor transplants, performance score, and year of transplantation. In conclusion, overweight children with aplastic anemia have worse outcomes after HCT. The impact of obesity on survival outcomes in children should be discussed during pretransplantation counseling.
Related JoVE Video
Access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: effect of race and sex.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) to treat leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma (MM) differs by race and sex.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a global perspective.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires significant infrastructure. Little is known about HSCT use and the factors associated with it on a global level.
Related JoVE Video
NCI First International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: report from the Committee on the Epidemiology and Natural History of Relapse following Allogeneic Cell Transpla
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is increasingly being used for treatment of hematologic malignancies, and the immunologic graft-versus-tumor effect (GVT) provides its therapeutic effectiveness. Disease relapse remains a cause of treatment failure in a significant proportion of patients undergoing alloHSCT without improvements over the last 2-3 decades. We summarize here current data and outline future research regarding the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of relapse after alloHSCT. Although some factors (eg, disease status at alloHSCT or graft-versus-host disease [GVHD] effects) are common, other disease-specific factors may be unique. The impact of reduced-intensity regimens on relapse and survival still need to be assessed using contemporary supportive care and comparable patient populations. The outcome of patients relapsing after an alloHSCT generally remains poor even though interventions including donor leukocyte infusions can benefit some patients. Trials examining targeted therapies along with improved safety of alloHSCT may result in improved outcomes, yet selection bias necessitates prospective assessment to gauge the real contribution of any new therapies. Ongoing chronic GVHD (cGVHD) or other residual post-alloHSCT morbidities may limit the applicability of new therapies. Developing strategies to promptly identify patients as alloHSCT candidates, while malignancy is in a more treatable stage, could decrease relapses rates after alloHSCT. Better understanding and monitoring of minimal residual disease posttransplant could lead to novel preemptive treatments of relapse. Analyses of larger cohorts through multicenter collaborations or registries remain essential to probe questions not amenable to single center or prospective studies. Studies need to provide data with detail on disease status, prior treatments, biologic markers, and posttransplant events. Stringent statistical methods to study relapse remain an important area of research. The opportunities for improvement in prevention and management of post-alloHSCT relapse are apparent, but clinical discipline in their careful study remains important.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple sclerosis: collaboration of the CIBMTR and EBMT to facilitate international clinical studies.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Clinical investigation of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) has been ongoing for over a decade. While several phase II studies have been finalized or are in progress, no definitive prospective randomized studies comparing HSCT versus alternative therapies for MS have been completed. In this conference report of North American and European experts who are involved in the care of MS patients, including neurologists and HSCT physicians, and representatives of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), we (1) critically review progress to date in HSCT for MS; (2) describe current registry based projects including long-term follow-up studies in HSCT for MS and harmonization of the MS disease-specific research forms that will be used in future by both databases; (3) discuss challenges in study design for a prospective randomized clinical trial of HSCT versus alternative therapy for MS such as feasibility, and the importance of multidisciplinary clinical teams, need for a large sample size and duration of observation required for outcomes assessment; and (4) address future directions in HSCT therapy for MS. To undertake a definitive multicenter clinical trial in autologous HSCT for MS, it will be important to begin well in advance to assemble the team, evaluate proposals for study design, and consider options for the infrastructure and logistical support that will be needed. International collaboration, including partnership with the CIBMTR and EBMT, may be desirable and may in fact be critical for successful completion of a definitive comparative study.
Related JoVE Video
Obesity does not preclude safe and effective myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in adults.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The incidence of excessive adiposity is increasing worldwide, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes. We compared outcomes by body mass index (BMI) for adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who underwent autologous (auto, n = 373), related donor (RD, n = 2041), or unrelated donor (URD, n = 1801) allogeneic myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2004. Four weight groups by BMI (kg/m(2)) were defined: underweight <18 kg/m(2); normal 18-25 kg/m(2); overweight >25-30 kg/m(2); and obese >30 kg/m(2). Multivariable analysis referenced to the normal weight group showed an increased risk of death for underweight patients in the RD group (relative risk [RR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-2.89; P = .002), but not in the URD group. There were no other differences in outcomes among the other weight groups within the other HCT groups. Overweight and obese patients enjoyed a modest decrease in relapse incidence, although this did not translate into a survival benefit. Small numbers of patients limit the ability to better characterize the adverse outcomes seen in the underweight RD but not the underweight URD allogeneic HCT patients. Obesity alone should not be considered a barrier to HCT.
Related JoVE Video
Second unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for primary graft failure.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Failure to engraft donor cells is a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We describe the results of 122 patients reported to the National Marrow Donor Program between 1990 and 2005, who received a second unrelated donor HCT after failing to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of >or=500/microL without recurrent disease. Patients were transplanted for leukemia (n = 83), myelodysplastic disorders (n = 16), severe aplastic anemia (n = 20), and other diseases (n = 3). The median age was 29 years. Twenty-four patients received second grafts from a different unrelated donor. Among 98 patients who received a second graft from the same donor, 28 received products that were previously collected and cryopreserved for the first transplantation. One-year overall survival (OS) after second transplant was 11%, with 10 patients alive at last follow-up. We observed no differences between patients who received grafts from the same or different donors, or in those who received fresh or cryopreserved product. The outcomes after a second allogeneic HCT for primary graft failure are dismal. Identifying risk factors for primary graft failure can decrease the incidence of this complication. Further studies are needed to test whether early recognition and hastened procurement of alternative grafts can improve transplant outcomes for primary graft failure.
Related JoVE Video
Allogeneic transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDSs) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) have a poor prognosis with conventional therapy. Encouraging results are reported after allogeneic transplantation. We analyzed outcomes in 868 persons with t-AML (n = 545) or t-MDS (n = 323) receiving allogeneic transplants from 1990 to 2004. A myeloablative regimen was used for conditioning in 77%. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were 41% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38-44) and 27% (24-30) at 1 year and 48% (44-51) and 31% (28-34) at 5 years, respectively. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 32% (95% CI, 29-36) and 37% (34-41) at 1 year and 21% (18-24) and 22% (19-26) at 5 years, respectively. In multivariate analysis, 4 risk factors had adverse impacts on DFS and OS: (1) age older than 35 years; (2) poor-risk cytogenetics; (3) t-AML not in remission or advanced t-MDS; and (4) donor other than an HLA-identical sibling or a partially or well-matched unrelated donor. Five-year survival for subjects with none, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of these risk factors was 50% (95% CI, 38-61), 26% (20-31), 21% (16-26), 10% (5-15), and 4% (0-16), respectively (P < .001). These data permit a more precise prediction of outcome and identify subjects most likely to benefit from allogeneic transplantation.
Related JoVE Video
Defining the intensity of conditioning regimens: working definitions.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Defining conditioning regimen intensity has become a critical issue for the hemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) community. In the present report we propose to define conditioning regimens in 3 categories: (1) myeloablative (MA) conditioning, (2) reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), and (3) nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning. Assignment to these categories is based on the duration of cytopenia and on the requirement for stem cell (SC) support: MA regimens cause irreversible cytopenia and SC support is mandatory. NMA regimens cause minimal cytopenia, and can be given also without SC support. RIC regimens do not fit criteria for MA or NMA regimens: they cause cytopenia of variable duration, and should be given with stem cell support, although cytopenia may not be irreversible. This report also assigns commonly used regimens to one of these categories, based upon the agents, dose, or combinations. Standardized classification of conditioning regimen intensities will allow comparison across studies and interpretation of study results.
Related JoVE Video
Etanercept, mycophenolate, denileukin, or pentostatin plus corticosteroids for acute graft-versus-host disease: a randomized phase 2 trial from the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is the primary limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Corticosteroids remain the standard initial therapy, yet only 25% to 41% of patients completely respond. This randomized, 4-arm, phase 2 trial was designed to identify the most promising agent(s) for initial therapy for aGVHD. Patients were randomized to receive methylprednisolone 2 mg/kg per day plus etanercept, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), denileukin diftitox (denileukin), or pentostatin. Patients (n = 180) were randomized; their median age was 50 years (range, 7.5-70 years). Myeloablative conditioning represented 66% of transplants. Grafts were peripheral blood (61%), bone marrow (25%), or umbilical cord blood (14%); 53% were from unrelated donors. Patients who received MMF for prophylaxis (24%) were randomized to a non-MMF arm. At randomization, aGVHD was grade I to II (68%), III to IV (32%), and (53%) had visceral organ involvement. Day 28 complete response rates were etanercept 26%, MMF 60%, denileukin 53%, and pentostatin 38%. Corresponding 9-month overall survival was 47%, 64%, 49%, and 47%, respectively. Cumulative incidences of severe infections were as follows: etanercept 48%, MMF 44%, denileukin 62%, and pentostatin 57%. Efficacy and toxicity data suggest the use of MMF plus corticosteroids is the most promising regimen to compare against corticosteroids alone in a definitive phase 3 trial. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00224874.
Related JoVE Video
Reduced-intensity conditioning regimen workshop: defining the dose spectrum. Report of a workshop convened by the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
During the 2006 BMT Tandem Meetings, a workshop was convened by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to discuss conditioning regimen intensity and define boundaries of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The goal of the workshop was to determine the acceptance of available RIC definitions in the transplant community. Participants were surveyed regarding their opinions on specific statements on conditioning regimen intensity. Questions covered the "Champlin criteria," as well as operational definitions used in registry studies, exemplified in clinical vignettes. A total of 56 participants, including transplantation physicians, transplant center directors, and transplantation nurses, with a median of 12 years of experience in HCT, answered the survey. Of these, 67% agreed that a RIC regimen should cause reversible myelosuppression when administered without stem cell support, result in low nonhematologic toxicity, and, after transplantation, result in mixed donor-recipient chimerism at the time of first assessment in most patients. Likewise, the majority (71%) agreed or strongly agreed that regimens including < 500 cGy of total body irradiation as a single fraction or 800 cGy in fractionated doses, busulfan dose < 9 mg/kg, melphalan dose <140 mg/m(2), or thiotepa dose < 10 mg/kg should be considered RIC regimens. However, only 32% agreed or strongly agreed that the combination of carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (BEAM) should be considered a RIC regimen. These results demonstrate that although HCT professionals have not reached a consensus on what constitutes a RIC regimen, most accept currently used criteria and operational definitions. These results support the continued use of current criteria for RIC regimens until a consensus statement can be developed.
Related JoVE Video
Comparative outcomes of donor graft CD34+ selection and immune suppressive therapy as graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission undergoing HLA-matched sibling allogeneic hematopoietic cell transpl
J. Clin. Oncol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
T-cell depletion (TCD) reduces the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, concerns about relapse, graft rejection, and variability in technique have limited the widespread application of this approach.
Related JoVE Video
Transplantation for autoimmune diseases in north and South America: a report of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an emerging therapy for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (AID). We report data on 368 patients with AID who underwent HCT in 64 North and South American transplantation centers reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2009. Most of the HCTs involved autologous grafts (n = 339); allogeneic HCT (n = 29) was done mostly in children. The most common indications for HCT were multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The median age at transplantation was 38 years for autologous HCT and 25 years for allogeneic HCT. The corresponding times from diagnosis to HCT were 35 months and 24 months. Three-year overall survival after autologous HCT was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81%-91%). Median follow-up of survivors was 31 months (range, 1-144 months). The most common causes of death were AID progression, infections, and organ failure. On multivariate analysis, the risk of death was higher in patients at centers that performed fewer than 5 autologous HCTs (relative risk, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1-11.1; P = .03) and those that performed 5 to 15 autologous HCTs for AID during the study period (relative risk, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.5-11.7; P = .006) compared with patients at centers that performed more than 15 autologous HCTs for AID during the study period. AID is an emerging indication for HCT in the region. Collaboration of hematologists and other disease specialists with an outcomes database is important to promote optimal patient selection, analysis of the impact of prognostic variables and long-term outcomes, and development of clinical trials.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic cell transplantation in Latin America.
Hematology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The first bone marrow transplantation in Latin America was performed more than 30 years ago and since then several countries have started transplant programs. The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research captured information on 13,473 transplants performed in Latin America from 1981 to 2009. The current report summarizes this activity. Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil have the largest activity in the region. Despite increase in the annual number of transplants, the activity is limited to sibling donor and autologous transplants. Indications are similar to other regions with a proportionally higher number of pediatric transplants for treatment of non-malignant diseases. Unrelated donor transplant activity is also increasing through collaborations with international donor registries and the development of the first national donor registry in Brazil. Umbilical cord transplants were also reported in Latin American centers, mainly in Brazil and most commonly used for treatment of children with malignant diseases. In conclusion, hematopoietic cell transplantation is routinely performed in several centers in Latin America. However, the activity is low compared to the population in need. Challenges with costs of transplantation, donor availability, number of centers of excellence, and trained personnel need to be addressed for further development of this field in the region. Additionally, more integration between countries and transplant centers is an important next step and can assist in improving awareness for the field and maximizing the transplant activity in Latin America.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia in developing countries: perspectives from Latin America in the post-tyrosine kinase inhibitor era.
Hematology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are currently the first line treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in countries with high and intermediate-high gross national income. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in these countries is considered salvage therapy for eligible patients who failed TKI or progress to advanced disease stages. In Latin America, treatment for CML also changed with availability of TKI in the region. However, many challenges remain, as the cost of this class of medication and recommended monitoring is high. CML treatment practices in Latin America demonstrate that the majority of patients are treated with TKI at some point after diagnosis, most commonly imatinib mesylate, but still TKI can only be used after interferon failure in some countries. Other treatment practices are different from established international guidelines, outlying the importance of continuing medical education. Allogeneic HCT is a treatment option for CML in this region and could be considered a cost-effective approach in a small subset of young patients with available donors, as the overall cost of long-term non-transplant treatment may surpass the cost of transplantation. However, there are many challenges with HCT in Latin America such as access to experienced transplant centers, donor availability, and cost of essential drugs used after transplant, which further impacts expansion of this treatment approach in patients in need. In conclusion, Latin American patients with CML have access to state of the art CML treatment. Yet, drug costs have a tremendous impact on developing health systems. Optimization of CML treatment in the region with appropriate monitoring, recognizing patients who would be transplant candidates, and expanding access to transplantation for eligible patients may curtail these costs and further improve patient care.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.