JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A decade of invasive meningococcal disease surveillance in poland.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases.
Related JoVE Video
[Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Malopolska region of Poland, in the year 2002-2008. Is introduction of mass vaccination with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine justified?].
Med Wieku Rozwoj
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
According to the WHO pneumococcal infections are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children.
Related JoVE Video
[Peritonitis in the course of peritoneal dialisis caused by Haemophilus influenzae with BLNAR phenotype].
Pol. Merkur. Lekarski
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Most common bacterial species causing peritonitis in the course of peritoneal dialysis (PDP) are coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Haemophilus influenzae is rarely associated with PDP. Hereby we present the first known case of APD-associated peritonitis caused by non-type able H. influenzae (NTHi) presenting the beta-lactamase negative, ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) phenotype. An 18 year old boy who had been treated with the APD for 12 months due to SLE was admitted in good general condition with diagnosis of PDP. Standard diagnostic and therapeutical procedures were initiated. Dialysis fluid was turbid with cytosis of 435 WBC/ml. From dialysis fluid pure culture of Gram-negative coccobacillus was isolated. The isolate was identified as a BLNAR phenotype. The same bacterium was isolated from nasal swab. Blood cultures were negative. After evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility the treatment was changed for the oral ciprofloxacin. The treatment was successful. Control tests 2 days later revealed cytosis of 15 WBC/mm3 and control cultures of peritoneal fluid were negative. After two weeks of treatment the patient was discharged in a good condition. Haemophilus influenzae is a bacterium frequently colonizing the nasopharyngeal cavity. A PCR-based method allowed to classify isolates as NTHi. Infection was probably of the respiratory origin as the isolates (from peritoneal fluid and nasal swab) were undistinguishable. There are only few reports describing this species as an ethiologic agent of peritonitis. This case prove that Haemophilus species should be taken into account as a possible aethiologic agent of PDP, especially in patients on immunosupression with carrier state of H. influenzae in the upper respiratory tract. This kind of microorganism requires specific conditions during its growing in vitro. Identification of its sensitivity to antibiotics is essential in order to detect strains of BLNAR phenotype, as it is a crucial part of an effective antibiotic therapy.
Related JoVE Video
Automated peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis due to Haemophilus influenzae showing the BLNAR phenotype.
Int. J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A rare case of peritonitis due to beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae is described in an 18-year-old male undergoing automated peritoneal dialysis. The infection was probably of respiratory origin. Two strains of H. influenzae cultured from peritoneal fluid and a nasal swab were indistinguishable by molecular methods. The patient was successfully treated with oral ciprofloxacin. The authors suggest that this species should be taken into account as the etiologic agent of peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis. Targeted antimicrobial therapy should be based on local antibiotic resistance patterns.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.