JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gender, age-related, and regional differences of the magnetization transfer ratio of the cortical and subcortical brain gray matter.
J Magn Reson Imaging
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To explore gender, age-related, and regional differences of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of brain cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM).
Related JoVE Video
CA15-3 is a useful serum tumor marker for diagnostic integration of hybrid positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography during follow-up of breast cancer patients.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of CA15-3 for the diagnostic integration of molecular imaging findings performed with hybrid positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PETCT) technology.
Related JoVE Video
When does transapical aortic valve replacement become a futile procedure? An analysis from a national registry.
J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Patient selection is crucial to achieve good outcomes and to avoid futile procedures in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to identify independent predictors of 1-year mortality in patients surviving after transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement.
Related JoVE Video
Multisite longitudinal reliability of tract-based spatial statistics in diffusion tensor imaging of healthy elderly subjects.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Large-scale longitudinal neuroimaging studies with diffusion imaging techniques are necessary to test and validate models of white matter neurophysiological processes that change in time, both in healthy and diseased brains. The predictive power of such longitudinal models will always be limited by the reproducibility of repeated measures acquired during different sessions. At present, there is limited quantitative knowledge about the across-session reproducibility of standard diffusion metrics in 3T multi-centric studies on subjects in stable conditions, in particular when using tract based spatial statistics and with elderly people. In this study we implemented a multi-site brain diffusion protocol in 10 clinical 3T MRI sites distributed across 4 countries in Europe (Italy, Germany, France and Greece) using vendor provided sequences from Siemens (Allegra, Trio Tim, Verio, Skyra, Biograph mMR), Philips (Achieva) and GE (HDxt) scanners. We acquired DTI data (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3), b = 700 s/mm(2), 5 b0 and 30 diffusion weighted volumes) of a group of healthy stable elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) in two separate sessions at least a week apart. For each subject and session four scalar diffusion metrics were considered: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivity. The diffusion metrics from multiple subjects and sessions at each site were aligned to their common white matter skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics. The reproducibility at each MRI site was examined by looking at group averages of absolute changes relative to the mean (%) on various parameters: i) reproducibility of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the b0 images in centrum semiovale, ii) full brain test-retest differences of the diffusion metric maps on the white matter skeleton, iii) reproducibility of the diffusion metrics on atlas-based white matter ROIs on the white matter skeleton. Despite the differences of MRI scanner configurations across sites (vendors, models, RF coils and acquisition sequences) we found good and consistent test-retest reproducibility. White matter b0 SNR reproducibility was on average 7 ± 1% with no significant MRI site effects. Whole brain analysis resulted in no significant test-retest differences at any of the sites with any of the DTI metrics. The atlas-based ROI analysis showed that the mean reproducibility errors largely remained in the 2-4% range for FA and AD and 2-6% for MD and RD, averaged across ROIs. Our results show reproducibility values comparable to those reported in studies using a smaller number of MRI scanners, slightly different DTI protocols and mostly younger populations. We therefore show that the acquisition and analysis protocols used are appropriate for multi-site experimental scenarios.
Related JoVE Video
Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.
Related JoVE Video
Comparison of whole-body PET/CT and PET/MRI in breast cancer patients: Lesion detection and quantitation of 18F-deoxyglucose uptake in lesions and in normal organ tissues.
Eur J Radiol
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To compare the performance of PET/MRI imaging using MR attenuation correction (MRAC) (DIXON-based 4-segment -map) in breast cancer patients with that of PET/CT using CT-based attenuation correction and to compare the quantification accuracy in lesions and in normal organ tissues.
Related JoVE Video
Medium term outcomes of transapical aortic valve implantation: results from the Italian Registry of Trans-Apical Aortic Valve Implantation.
Ann. Thorac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proposed as a therapeutic option for high-risk or inoperable patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this multicenter study was to assess early and medium term outcomes of transapical aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI).
Related JoVE Video
Generating personalized advice for schizophrenia patients.
Artif Intell Med
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The results of routine patient assessments in psychiatric healthcare in the Northern Netherlands are primarily used to support clinicians. We developed Wegweis, a web-based advice platform, to make this data accessible and understandable for patients.
Related JoVE Video
Asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface to control a virtual environment: initial tests on end users.
Clin EEG Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system was recently validated with the participation of healthy young volunteers for environmental control. In this study, the asynchronous P300-based BCI for the interaction with a virtual home environment was tested with the participation of potential end-users (clients of a Frisian home care organization) with limited autonomy due to ageing and/or motor disabilities. System testing revealed that the minimum number of stimulation sequences needed to achieve correct classification had a higher intra-subject variability in potential end-users with respect to what was previously observed in young controls. Here we show that the asynchronous modality performed significantly better as compared to the synchronous mode in continuously adapting its speed to the users state. Furthermore, the asynchronous system modality confirmed its reliability in avoiding misclassifications and false positives, as previously shown in young healthy subjects. The asynchronous modality may contribute to filling the usability gap between BCI systems and traditional input devices, representing an important step towards their use in the activities of daily living.
Related JoVE Video
Minimally invasive video-assisted cardiac surgery: operative techniques, application fields and clinical outcomes.
Future Cardiol
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Minimally invasive video-assisted surgery through a right minithoracotomy has become the standard surgical approach for several cardiac diseases at many major centers worldwide. In this article we review the existing literature on the subject and describe different operative techniques, application fields and clinical outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
Smart homes to improve the quality of life for all.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A home is smart when, being aware of its own state and that of its users, is capable of controlling itself in order to support the user wishes and thus improving their quality of life. This holds both for users with special needs and for those with ordinary domestic needs. In this paper, we overview the Smart Homes for All project which represents the current state of the art with respect to software control and user interfaces in the smart homes arena.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic profiling and ovarian cancer therapy (review).
Mol Med Rep
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
High variability observed among ovarian cancer patients in response to the same therapy and the related toxicity may be correlated to gene polymorphisms and genetic alterations affecting the metabolism of drugs commonly used to treat this tumor. Recent studies have shown a correlation between the polymorphisms characterizing GSTM1-T1 detoxifying enzymes and poor outcome in advanced ovarian cancer patients treated with platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance 1 (mdr-1) polymorphisms were found to be associated with resistance to paclitaxel treatment. Polymorphisms of MRP2, a protein involved in methotrexate, cisplatin and irinotecan active metabolite glucuronide transport, negatively affect platinum-based chemotherapy response. A similar occurrence has been observed with CYP1A1 Ile462Val and ercc1 C118T polymorphisms while patients who were carriers of MTHFR C677T polymorphism had a better response to methotrexate therapy, but an elevated risk of toxicity. Biological therapy with Bevacizumab, the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor has been shown to be less efficient in ovarian cancer patients carrying the polymorphism of the Interleukin-8 gene. Instead, polymorphisms in the XPD gene (Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn), a member of the nucleotide excision repair pathway, positively affects the response to therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel. Therefore, the study of genetic profiling is crucial to improving the clinicians ability to tailor effective therapy to the molecular profile of the patient while minimizing toxicities. This review describes clinical applications of the above genetic polymorphisms in ovarian cancer patients treated with platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy.
Related JoVE Video
Related JoVE Video
Role of genetic polymorphisms and mutations in colorectal cancer therapy (Review).
Mol Med Rep
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Gene polymorphisms and mutations in various types of cancer may predict clinical response to chemotherapy and related toxicity, since they may affect the metabolism of the drugs commonly used in combination chemotherapy treatments. However, conflicting data have been generated on this subject. To elucidate this issue, this review discusses the clinical applications of several genetic polymorphisms in colorectal cancer patients treated with the most common agents alone or in combination. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 is a conjugating biotransformation enzyme that plays a role in maintaining the levels of endogenous compounds (e.g., bilirubin) and in handling exogenous compounds, including carcinogens. It has been demonstrated that the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism plays a predictive role in patients administered an irinotecan-containing regimen. Polymorphisms in XPD (Lys751Gln), a member of the nucleotide excision repair pathway, negatively affect response to therapy, with oxaliplatin/5FU reducing the survival of the patient. A similar reaction has also been observed in patients with the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism, while patients with the GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism have an improved response to oxaliplatin/5FU therapy. Treatment with biological compounds such as cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be effective only in colon cancer patients with wild-type K-Ras. Fc polymorphisms are associated with progression-free survival in patients treated with cetuximab. Another monoclonal antibody useful in the treatment of colon cancer is bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); however, in some cases bevacizumab may cause deep vein thrombosis (DVP). In a related vein, our recent unpublished data show that the VEGF C936T polymorphism may increase the risk of DVP in cancer patients. In conclusion, this review indicates that certain polymorphisms increase the effectiveness of certain drugs, while others greatly enhance their toxicity. The study of the genetic habitus therefore appears to be crucial for the development of tailored therapy for cancer patients.
Related JoVE Video
Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement in a transplanted heart.
Ann. Thorac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Heart transplantation is subject to a number of chronic complications that may limit graft survival and be detrimental to the patients quality of life. Aortic valve stenosis is a rare complication found after cardiac transplantation, which we believe has never been described on a tricuspid normal aortic valve. In the present study, we report a case of successful aortic valve replacement performed 16 years after cardiac transplantation on an extensively calcified tricuspid valve. Surgery was performed by using a minimally invasive approach with a reverse T upper mini-sternotomy, and the aortic valve was replaced by a biological prosthesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged 7 days after the operation.
Related JoVE Video
Minimally invasive video-assisted approach for left atrial myxoma resection.
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Minimally invasive surgery has become the standard approach for several cardiac diseases. We report in the present study our ten-year experience with endoscopic cardiac surgery for left atrial myxoma resection. Between January 1998 and January 2008, 14 patients (median age: 61 years) underwent surgery for left atrial myxoma resection at our institution. The Heartport access system and the video-assistance were systematically employed to provide excellent vision and facilitate surgery. The aortic clamping was obtained with an EndoClamp in 11 cases (using a central or peripheral endoaortic balloon, depending on the site of the arterial cannulation) or transthoracically with the Portaclamp system in two cases and the Chitwood clamp in one case. The average time needed for cross-clamping was 49+/-29 min, with a mean cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time of 88+/-57 min. There were no early or late hospital deaths. Mean intensive care unit and hospital stay were three and eight days, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 64 months and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor. There were two late deaths due to acute ischemic stroke. Minimally invasive video-assisted surgery for left atrial myxoma resection is a safe, reproducible and cosmetic operation and can be considered an effective oncologic approach as an alternative to standard sternotomy.
Related JoVE Video
Should we perform heart retransplantation in early graft failure?
Transpl. Int.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cardiac retransplantation represents the gold standard treatment for a failing cardiac graft but the decision to offer the patient a second chance is often made difficult by both lack of donors and the ethical issues involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether retransplantation is a reasonable option in case of early graft failure. Between November 1985 and June 2008, 922 patients underwent cardiac transplantation at our Institution. Of these, 37 patients (4%) underwent cardiac retransplantation for cardiac failure resulting from early graft failure (n = 11) or late graft failure (acute rejection: n = 2, transplant-related coronary artery disease: n = 24). Survival at 1, 5 and 10 years of patients with retransplantation was 59%, 50% and 40% respectively. An interval between the first and the second transplantation of less than (n = 11, all in early graft failure) or more than (n = 26) 1 month was associated with a 1-year survival of 27% and 73%, and a 5-year survival of 27% and 65% respectively (P = 0.01). The long-term outcome of cardiac retransplantation is comparable with that of primary transplantation only in patients with transplant-related coronary artery disease. Early graft failure is a significant risk factor for survival after cardiac retransplantation and should be considered as an exclusion criteria.
Related JoVE Video
Port-access surgery as elective approach for mitral valve operation in re-do procedures.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Re-do mitral valve procedures performed through median sternotomy carry substantial mortality and morbidity. To avoid complications of sternal re-entry and to provide adequate mitral valve exposure, antero-lateral thoracotomy has been suggested by some authors.
Related JoVE Video
Port-access minimally invasive surgery for atrial septal defects: a 10-year single-center experience in 166 patients.
J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We assessed the surgical results and the benefits to the patient of a minimally invasive surgical approach for atrial septal defects.
Related JoVE Video
Field and laboratory methods in human milk research.
Am. J. Hum. Biol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human milk is a complex and variable fluid of increasing interest to human biologists who study nutrition and health. The collection and analysis of human milk poses many practical and ethical challenges to field workers, who must balance both appropriate methodology with the needs of participating mothers and infants and logistical challenges to collection and analysis. In this review, we address various collection methods, volume measurements, and ethical considerations and make recommendations for field researchers. We also review frequently used methods for the analysis of fat, protein, sugars/lactose, and specific biomarkers in human milk. Finally, we address new technologies in human milk research, the MIRIS Human Milk Analyzer and dried milk spots, which will improve the ability of human biologists and anthropologists to study human milk in field settings.
Related JoVE Video
Usability evaluation of a web-based support system for people with a schizophrenia diagnosis.
J. Med. Internet Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) is a systematic way of assessing service users health conditions for the purpose of better aiding their care. ROM consists of various measures used to assess a service users physical, psychological, and social condition. While ROM is becoming increasingly important in the mental health care sector, one of its weaknesses is that ROM is not always sufficiently service user-oriented. First, clinicians tend to concentrate on those ROM results that provide information about clinical symptoms and functioning, whereas it has been suggested that a service user-oriented approach needs to focus on personal recovery. Second, service users have limited access to ROM results and they are often not equipped to interpret them. These problems need to be addressed, as access to resources and the opportunity to share decision making has been indicated as a prerequisite for service users to become a more equal partner in communication with their clinicians. Furthermore, shared decision making has been shown to improve the therapeutic alliance and to lead to better care.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.