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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Evaluation of rapid progressors in HIV infection as an extreme phenotype.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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Rapid CD4 cell loss represents an HIV phenotype used to identify causal variants of accelerated disease progression. The optimal rate and threshold for identifying this extreme phenotype in recently infected individuals is unclear.
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Trends in virological and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV-1 infection and virological failure of drugs from three antiretroviral drug classes: a cohort study.
Lancet Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2011
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Limited treatment options have been available for people with HIV who have had virological failure of the three original classes of HIV antiretroviral drugs-so-called triple-class virological failure (TCVF). However, introduction of new drugs and drug classes might have improved outcomes. We aimed to assess trends in virological and clinical outcomes for individuals with TCVF in 2000-09.
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Targeting candidates for directly administered highly active antiretroviral therapy: benefits observed in HIV-infected injecting drug users in residential drug-rehabilitation facilities.
AIDS Patient Care STDS
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the potential benefits of directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) in HIV-infected former injecting drug users (ex-IDUs) admitted to residential drug rehabilitation facilities. We compared 106 of these patients consecutively admitted in 12 communities where DAART was administered (DAART group) to two matched control groups of ex-IDUs undergoing self-administered ART: 106 subjects in other 10 communities (SAT group) and 106 outpatients at hospital infectious-disease wards where community patients were referred after discharge (OUT group). We estimated the proportion of patients with high adherence and the hazard ratio (HR) of 20% or more increase in the CD4(+) cell count and of reaching an undetectable viral load. The proportion of patients with high adherence to treatment was highest in the DAART group. The probability of 20% or more increase in the CD4(+) cell count was significantly lower in the two control groups versus the DAART group (SAT group HR=0.32; OUT group HR=0.43). The HR of observing an undetectable HIV-RNA level versus DAART was significantly lower in the OUT group (HR: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.97) but did not reach statistical significance for the SAT group (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.74-1.33). Our findings after a 24-month follow-up, suggest that DAART in HIV-infected patients of drug-rehabilitation communities improves adherence, immunologic, and virologic outcome toward free outpatients. Even if our retrospective 36-month data do not show a prolonged viral suppression in these patients, DAART may be considered a valuable therapeutic and educational strategy in this particular target group.
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The hepatitis C epidemic among HIV-positive MSM: incidence estimates from 1990 to 2007.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2011
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Outbreaks of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among HIV-infected MSM have been described since 2000. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the spread of HCV started around 1996. We estimated the incidence of HCV in HIV-infected MSM with well estimated dates of HIV seroconversion from 1990 to 2007.
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Decline of CD4? T-cell count before start of therapy and immunological response to treatment in antiretroviral-naive individuals.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2011
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Treatment guidelines recommend initiation of therapy for individuals experiencing rapid CD4 cell decline. It is not known, however, whether the rate of CD4 cell decline before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is related to immunological response following cART.
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Immunologic response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and mortality reduction in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-positive persons in Mozambique.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2010
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Since February 2002, the Drug Resources Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Program has provided highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and immunologic and virologic monitoring free of charge. We conducted a cohort study of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Mozambique. Only persons treated with HAART with available CD4 cell counts at baseline and ? 1 CD4 cell count after HAART were included. Survival analysis was applied to evaluate the prognostic value of CD4 cell counts measured at three months. Possible confounders were considered. A total of 753 persons who started HAART included; 59% were females. Median age was 34 years (range = 16-67 years), and the median CD4 cell count at baseline was 172 cells/mm3 (interquartile range = 87-261 cells/mm3, range = 0-1,322 cells/mm3). Overall, 105 persons (14%) died. Of these persons 54 (51%) developed AIDS before they died; 25 (3%) died during the first three months. After three months of therapy, the individual median CD4 cell count change from the baseline value was +101 cells/mm3 (interquartile range = +27 to +187 cells/mm3, range = -723 to +310 cells/mm3). A median CD4 increment of 100 cells/mm3 in three months was associated with a mortality reduction of 50% compared with an increase of < 50 cells (relative hazard of death adjusted for baseline CD4 cell count = 0.54, 95% confidence interval = 0.30-0.95). A good initial response to HAART was associated with a significant reduction of mortality. This finding supports the effectiveness of HAART in resource-poor settings.
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[Epidemiology of HIV. Update].
Recenti Prog Med
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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In this decade, the global prevalence of HIV-1 infection stabilized at 0.8% (range: 0.7-0.9%). However, important regional differences in trends and mode of transmission: Sub-Saharan Africa is the most affected by HIV. Since 2001, the number of people with HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia increased from 650,000 to 1,5 million in 2007. Overall trends were stable in Central and Western Europe. Heterosexual and homosexual transmission accounts for the largest proportion in these regions. Transmission among injecting drug users has decreased. Similar trends have been observed in Italy: in 2007, there were 1,679 new diagnoses, equivalent to an incidence of 6,0 per 100,000 population. Over the years there has been a progressive increase in the proportion of diagnoses among women and in the median age at diagnosis, as well as changes in the exposure categories (i.e. a decrease in the proportion of injecting drug users and an increase in infections attributed to homosexual and heterosexual contacts). The era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has resulted in a reduction of morbidity and mortality. Before the advent of cART in 1996, the main causes of morbidity and mortality in people with HIV were the opportunistic infections and malignancies AIDS associated.
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Pretreatment CD4 cell slope and progression to AIDS or death in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy--the CASCADE collaboration: a collaboration of 23 cohort studies.
PLoS Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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CD4 cell count is a strong predictor of the subsequent risk of AIDS or death in HIV-infected patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is not known whether the rate of CD4 cell decline prior to therapy is related to prognosis and should, therefore, influence the decision on when to initiate cART.
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Viral causes of influenza-like illness: Insight from a study during the winters 2004-2007.
J. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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Limited information is available on the viral etiology of influenza-like illness in southern European countries, and it is still a matter of debate whether certain symptoms can be used to distinguish among the specific viruses that cause influenza-like illness. The main objective of the present study was to identify the demographic and clinical predictors of influenza-like illness due to specific viral agents. The study, which was observational in design, was conducted in Rome and Naples, Italy. Cases of influenza-like illness were defined as individuals with fever >37.5 degrees C and at least one systemic and one respiratory symptom, recruited during the winters of 2004-2005, 2005-2006, and 2006-2007. Influenza and other respiratory viruses were identified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), performed on throat swabs. Basic individual information was collected using a standard form. A total of 580 persons were included in the analysis. Viral pathogens were identified in fewer than 50% of the cases. Overall, 240 viral agents were detected: 22.8% were positive for influenza viruses, 10.9% for adenoviruses, 6.0% for parainfluenza viruses, and 1.7% for respiratory syncytial virus. The month of diagnosis, and muscle and joint pain were associated with influenza virus, though the positive predictive value (PPV) was low. Abdominal pain was associated with adenovirus infection. Although the PPV of symptoms for influenza virus infection was low, especially in low activity periods, these findings may help clinicians to improve their ability to perform diagnoses.
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Non-AIDS-defining deaths and immunodeficiency in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2009
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To assess whether immunodeficiency is associated with the most frequent non-AIDS-defining causes of death in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).
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Effect of HCV infection on cause-specific mortality after HIV seroconversion, before and after 1997.
Gastroenterology
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Individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection frequently also are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (co-infection), but little is known about its effects on the progression of HIV-associated disease. We aimed to determine the effects of co-infection on mortality from HIV and/or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and hepatitis or liver disease, adjusting for the duration of HIV infection.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.