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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Clinical characteristics and service use of incarcerated males with severe mental disorders: a comparative case-control study with patients found not criminally responsible.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2014
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Since the drop in the bed capacity of civil psychiatric hospitals, an increase in the bed capacity of forensic psychiatric care and prison units has been reported in the United States and Europe. However, in Canada, a decrease in the number of people with severe mental illness (SMI) during the last two decades in penitentiaries has been reported. At the same time, an increase in individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) was observed in forensic hospitals. The aim of this study is to compare incarcerated severely mentally ill (I-SMI) individuals with forensic-hospitalized SMI individuals in terms of their clinical profiles and service use in the province of Quebec (Canada). A case-control study design was selected using a sample of 44 I-SMI individuals and 59 forensic-hospitalized SMI individuals. Important findings include the following: I-SMI persons had less schooling; they more often reported suicide attempts and violent and non-violent crimes; and they had a higher level of comorbidity involving Cluster B personality disorders and substance-use disorders. Forensic-hospitalized SMI persons were more likely to have been receiving psychiatric follow-up before hospitalization. The final logistic regression model showed that lifetime suicide attempts, non-violent crimes, and psychopathic traits were higher among I-SMI individuals than among forensic-hospitalized SMI individuals. In contrast, receiving regular psychiatric follow-up was associated with forensic-hospitalized SMI individuals. Differences in psychopathological characteristics and the use of mental health services were found for I-SMI persons. More research is needed to determine which new initiatives might be efficacious in addressing the mental health needs of I-SMI individuals.
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Profiles of patients admitted to a psychiatric intensive care unit: secluded with or without restraint.
Can J Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2013
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To identify and describe the profiles of patients admitted to a psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU) as they relate to seclusion and restraint.
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The experience of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric settings: perspectives of patients.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2013
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Many studies report that the use of seclusion and restraint (SR) is experienced negatively by patients who experience feelings of shame, helplessness, and humiliation, and may relive previous trauma events. Since 2000, in Québec, exceptional measures like SR have been framed by a protocol. This protocol provides health care teams with guidelines for relieving, containing, and reducing the suffering caused by SR. We have no knowledge, however, about the views of patients regarding application of the protocol. This study aims to understand the perception of patients regarding application of the SR protocol. For this purpose, a questionnaire was presented to patients (n = 50) who experienced an episode of SR in a psychiatric hospital in Canada. Results show that patients had a nuanced perception of SR: Some felt that SR was a helpful measure, while others felt that SR was not a helpful measure. Patients tended to agree with statements related to the comfort and safety of seclusion rooms and the meeting of their physical needs. Regarding support, they suggested relational, drug, and environmental interventions to prevent seclusion. Finally, nearly all patients perceived that the health care team did not follow-up with the patients after the experience; such follow-up is essential for reconstructing a sometimes confusing event.
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Triptolide-mediated inhibition of interferon signaling enhances vesicular stomatitis virus-based oncolysis.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2013
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Preclinical and clinical trials demonstrated that use of oncolytic viruses (OVs) is a promising new therapeutic approach to treat multiple types of cancer. To further improve their viral oncolysis, experimental strategies are now combining OVs with different cytotoxic compounds. In this study, we investigated the capacity of triptolide - a natural anticancer molecule - to enhance vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) oncolysis in OV-resistant cancer cells. Triptolide treatment increased VSV replication in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 and in other VSV-resistant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, triptolide (TPL) inhibited the innate antiviral response by blocking type I interferon (IFN) signaling, downstream of IRF3 activation. Furthermore, triptolide-enhanced VSV-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion in VSV-resistant cells, as measured by annexin-V, cleaved caspase-3, and B-cell lymphoma 2 staining. In vivo, using the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and PC3 mouse xenograft models, combination treatment with VSV and triptolide delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals by enhancing viral replication. Together, these results demonstrate that triptolide inhibition of IFN production sensitizes prostate cancer cells to VSV replication and virus-mediated apoptosis.
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Systems analysis of a RIG-I agonist inducing broad spectrum inhibition of virus infectivity.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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The RIG-I like receptor pathway is stimulated during RNA virus infection by interaction between cytosolic RIG-I and viral RNA structures that contain short hairpin dsRNA and 5 triphosphate (5ppp) terminal structure. In the present study, an RNA agonist of RIG-I was synthesized in vitro and shown to stimulate RIG-I-dependent antiviral responses at concentrations in the picomolar range. In human lung epithelial A549 cells, 5pppRNA specifically stimulated multiple parameters of the innate antiviral response, including IRF3, IRF7 and STAT1 activation, and induction of inflammatory and interferon stimulated genes - hallmarks of a fully functional antiviral response. Evaluation of the magnitude and duration of gene expression by transcriptional profiling identified a robust, sustained and diversified antiviral and inflammatory response characterized by enhanced pathogen recognition and interferon (IFN) signaling. Bioinformatics analysis further identified a transcriptional signature uniquely induced by 5pppRNA, and not by IFN?-2b, that included a constellation of IRF7 and NF-kB target genes capable of mobilizing multiple arms of the innate and adaptive immune response. Treatment of primary PBMCs or lung epithelial A549 cells with 5pppRNA provided significant protection against a spectrum of RNA and DNA viruses. In C57Bl/6 mice, intravenous administration of 5pppRNA protected animals from a lethal challenge with H1N1 Influenza, reduced virus titers in mouse lungs and protected animals from virus-induced pneumonia. Strikingly, the RIG-I-specific transcriptional response afforded partial protection from influenza challenge, even in the absence of type I interferon signaling. This systems approach provides transcriptional, biochemical, and in vivo analysis of the antiviral efficacy of 5pppRNA and highlights the therapeutic potential associated with the use of RIG-I agonists as broad spectrum antiviral agents.
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Tomato cystatin SlCYS8 as a stabilizing fusion partner for human serpin expression in plants.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Studies have reported the usefulness of fusion proteins to bolster recombinant protein yields in plants. Here, we assess the potential of tomato SlCYS8, a Cys protease inhibitor of the cystatin protein superfamily, as a stabilizing fusion partner for human alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (?1ACT) targeted to the plant cell secretory pathway. Using the model expression platform Nicotiana benthamiana, we show that the cystatin imparts a strong stabilizing effect when expressed as a translational fusion with ?1ACT, allowing impressive accumulation yields of over 2 mg/g of fresh weight tissue for the human serpin, a 25-fold improvement on the yield of ?1ACT expressed alone. Natural and synthetic peptide linkers inserted between SlCYS8 and ?1ACT have differential effects on protease inhibitory potency of the two protein partners in vitro. They also have a differential impact on the yield of ?1ACT, dependent on the extent to which the hybrid protein may remain intact in the plant cell environment. The stabilizing effect of SlCYS8 does not involve Cys protease inhibition and can be partly reproduced in the cytosol, where peptide linkers are less susceptible to degradation. The effect of SlCYS8 on ?1ACT yields could be explained by: (i) an improved translation of the human protein coding sequence; and/or (ii) an overall stabilization of its tertiary structure preventing proteolytic degradation and/or polymerization. These findings suggest the potential of plant cystatins as stabilizing fusion partners for recombinant proteins in plant systems. They also underline the need for an empirical assessment of peptide linker functions in plant cell environments.
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Ly49Q positively regulates type I IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells in an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-dependent manner.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are the major producers of type I IFN during the initial immune response to viral infection. Ly49Q, a C-type lectin-like receptor specific for MHC-I, possesses a cytoplasmic ITIM and is highly expressed on murine pDC. Using Ly49Q-deficient mice, we show that, regardless of strain background, this receptor is required for maximum IFN-? production by pDC. Furthermore, Ly49Q expression on pDC, but not myeloid dendritic cells, is necessary for optimal IL-12 secretion, MHC-II expression, activation of CD4(+) T cell proliferation, and nuclear translocation of the master IFN-? regulator IFN regulatory factor 7 in response to TLR9 agonists. In contrast, the absence of Ly49Q did not affect plasmacytoid dendritic cell-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells expression or pDC viability. Genetic complementation revealed that IFN-? production by pDC is dependent on an intact tyrosine residue in the Ly49Q cytoplasmic ITIM. However, pharmacological inhibitors and phosphatase-deficient mice indicate that Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP)-1, SHP-2, and SHIP phosphatase activity is dispensable for this function. Finally, we observed that Ly49Q itself is downregulated on pDC in response to CpG exposure in an ITIM-independent manner. In conclusion, Ly49Q enhances TLR9-mediated signaling events, leading to IFN regulatory factor 7 nuclear translocation and expression of IFN-I genes in an ITIM-dependent manner that can proceed without the involvement of SHP-1, SHP-2, and SHIP.
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BCL-2 inhibitors sensitize therapy-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to VSV oncolysis.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Many primary cancers including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are resistant to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-induced oncolysis due to overexpression of the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) family. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of CLL cell death induced as a consequence of VSV infection in the presence of BCL-2 inhibitors, obatoclax, and ABT-737 in primary ex vivo CLL patient samples. Microarray analysis of primary CD19? CD5? CLL cells treated with obatoclax and VSV revealed changes in expression of genes regulating apoptosis, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and cellular metabolism. A combined therapeutic effect was observed for VSV and BCL-2 inhibitors in cells from untreated patients and from patients unresponsive to standard of care therapy. In addition, combination treatment induced several markers of autophagy--LC3-II accumulation, p62 degradation, and staining of autophagic vacuoles. Inhibition of early stage autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) led to increased apoptosis in CLL samples. Mechanistically, a combination of BCL-2 inhibitors and VSV disrupted inhibitory interactions of Beclin-1 with BCL-2 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), thus biasing cells toward autophagy. We propose a mechanism in which changes in cellular metabolism, coupled with pharmacologic disruption of the BCL-2-Beclin-1 interactions, facilitate induction of apoptosis and autophagy to mediate the cytolytic effect of VSV.
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Protection of recombinant mammalian antibodies from development-dependent proteolysis in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The expression of clinically useful proteins in plants has been bolstered by the development of high-yielding systems for transient protein expression using agroinfiltration. There is a need now to know more about how host plant development and metabolism influence the quantity and quality of recombinant proteins. Endogenous proteolysis is a key determinant of the stability and yield of recombinant proteins in plants. Here we characterised cysteine (C1A) and aspartate (A1) protease profiles in leaves of the widely used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, in relation with the production of a murine IgG, C5-1, targeted to the cell secretory pathway. Agroinfiltration significantly altered the distribution of C1A and A1 proteases along the leaf age gradient, with a correlation between leaf age and the level of proteolysis in whole-cell and apoplast protein extracts. The co-expression of tomato cystatin SlCYS8, an inhibitor of C1A proteases, alongside C5-1 increased antibody yield by nearly 40% after the usual 6-days incubation period, up to ~3 mg per plant. No positive effect of SlCYS8 was observed in oldest leaves, in line with an increased level of C1A protease activity and a very low expression rate of the inhibitor. By contrast, C5-1 yield was greater by an additional 40% following 8- to 10-days incubations in younger leaves, where high SlCYS8 expression was maintained. These findings confirm that the co-expression of recombinant protease inhibitors is a promising strategy for increasing recombinant protein yields in plants, but that further opportunity exists to improve this approach by addressing the influence of leaf age and proteases of other classes.
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Vesicular stomatitis virus oncolytic treatment interferes with tumor-associated dendritic cell functions and abrogates tumor antigen presentation.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
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Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising biological approach to cancer treatment that contributes to tumor eradication via immune- and non-immune-mediated mechanisms. One of the remaining challenges for these experimental therapies is the necessity to develop a durable adaptive immune response against the tumor. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypical oncolytic virus (OV) that exemplifies the multiple mechanisms of oncolysis, including direct cell lysis, cellular hypoxia resulting from the shutdown of tumor vasculature, and inflammatory cytokine release. Despite these properties, the generation of sustained antitumor immunity is observed only when VSV is engineered to express a tumor antigen directly. In the present study, we sought to increase the number of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DC) in vivo and tumor antigen presentation by combining VSV treatment with recombinant Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (rFlt3L), a growth factor promoting the differentiation and proliferation of DC. The combination of VSV oncolysis and rFLt3L improved animal survival in two different tumor models, i.e., VSV-resistant B16 melanoma and VSV-sensitive E.G7 T lymphoma; however, increased survival was independent of the adaptive CD8 T cell response. Tumor-associated DC were actively infected by VSV in vivo, which reduced their viability and prevented their migration to the draining lymph nodes to prime a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response. These results demonstrate that VSV interferes with tumor DC functions and blocks tumor antigen presentation.
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Nursing practices recorded in reports of episodes of seclusion.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
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The purpose of this study is to describe the nursing practices recorded in reports of patient episodes of seclusion, with or without restraints, in a specialized psychiatric facility in Quebec. The reports for all adult patients secluded (n = 4863) in a psychiatric unit between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2009, were examined. Descriptive analyses were performed. The main reasons for seclusion were agitation, disorganization, and aggressive behaviour. The alternative methods that were attempted included stimulus reduction, extra medication, and working with the patient to find a solution. Few families were notified about their relations seclusion. More hours of seclusion were reported in the evening and at night. Our results are comparable to those obtained by other investigators. Some of the variables have not been the subject of much research: for example, health conditions during seclusion with or without restraint and partnerships with family members. Our findings also suggest that, in their analyses, studies should differentiate between cognitive-impairment and adult-psychiatry units as well as long-term seclusion and short-term seclusion. The information reported by the nurse makes no distinction between short-stay and long-stay adult psychiatric units. Only one psychiatric facility was investigated in this study, precluding generalization.
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Caspase-12 dampens the immune response to malaria independently of the inflammasome by targeting NF-kappaB signaling.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2010
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Pathogen sensing by the inflammasome activates inflammatory caspases that mediate inflammation and cell death. Caspase-12 antagonizes the inflammasome and NF-?B and is associated with susceptibility to bacterial sepsis. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (T(125)C) in human Casp12 restricts its expression to Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Here, we investigated the role of caspase-12 in the control of parasite replication and pathogenesis in malaria and report that caspase-12 dampened parasite clearance in blood-stage malaria and modulated susceptibility to cerebral malaria. This response was independent of the caspase-1 inflammasome, as casp1(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from wild-type animals in response to malaria, but dependent on enhanced NF-?B activation. Mechanistically, caspase-12 competed with NEMO for association with I?B kinase-?/?, effectively preventing the formation of the I?B kinase complex and inhibiting downstream transcriptional activation by NF-?B. Systemic inhibition of NF-?B or Ab neutralization of IFN-? reversed the increased resistance of casp12(-/-) mice to blood-stage malaria infection.
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Recombinant protease inhibitors for herbivore pest control: a multitrophic perspective.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2010
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Protease inhibitors are a promising complement to Bt toxins for the development of insect-resistant transgenic crops, but their limited specificity against proteolytic enzymes and the ubiquity of protease-dependent processes in living organisms raise questions about their eventual non-target effects in agroecosystems. After a brief overview of the main factors driving the impacts of insect-resistant transgenic crops on non-target organisms, the possible effects of protease inhibitors are discussed from a multitrophic perspective, taking into account not only the target herbivore proteases but also the proteases of other organisms found along the trophic chain, including the plant itself. Major progress has been achieved in recent years towards the design of highly potent broad-spectrum inhibitors and the field deployment of protease inhibitor-expressing transgenic plants resistant to major herbivore pests. A thorough assessment of the current literature suggests that, whereas the non-specific inhibitory effects of recombinant protease inhibitors in plant food webs could often be negligible and their unintended pleiotropic effects in planta of potential agronomic value, the innocuity of these proteins might always remain an issue to be assessed empirically, on a case-by-case basis.
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Plant cystatins.
Biochimie
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
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Plant cystatins have been the object of intense research since the publication of a first paper reporting their existence more than 20 years ago. These ubiquitous inhibitors of Cys proteases play several important roles in plants, from the control of various physiological and cellular processes in planta to the inhibition of exogenous Cys proteases secreted by herbivorous arthropods and pathogens to digest or colonize plant tissues. After an overview of current knowledge about the evolution, structure and inhibitory mechanism of plant cystatins, we review the different roles attributed to these proteins in plants. The potential of recombinant plant cystatins as effective pesticidal proteins in crop protection is also considered, as well as protein engineering approaches adopted over the years to improve their inhibitory potency and specificity towards Cys proteases of biotechnological interest.
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Clinical, biological and genetic analysis of prepubertal isolated ovarian cyst in 11 girls.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2010
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The cause of isolated gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty (PP) with an ovarian cyst is unknown in the majority of cases. Here, we describe 11 new cases of peripheral PP and, based on phenotypes observed in mouse models, we tested the hypothesis that mutations in the GNAS1, NR5A1, LHCGR, FSHR, NR5A1, StAR, DMRT4 and NOBOX may be associated with this phenotype.
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2-DE proteome maps for the leaf apoplast of Nicotiana benthamiana.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2010
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We provide 2-D gel reference maps for the apoplastic proteome of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infiltrated or not with the bacterial gene vector Agrobacterium tumefaciens. About 90 proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for identification and function assignment. We show, overall, an effective response of the plant to agroinfiltration involving a specific, cell wall maintenance-independent up-regulation of defense protein secretion. The proteome maps described should be a useful tool for systemic studies on plant-pathogen interactions or cell wall metabolism. They also should prove useful for the monitoring of secreted recombinant proteins and their possible pleiotropic effects along the cell secretory pathway of N. benthamiana leaves used as an expression platform for clinically useful proteins.
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The nursing decision making process in seclusion episodes in a psychiatric facility.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2010
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This study explores and describes nursing interventions performed during episodes of seclusion with or without restraint in a psychiatric facility and examines the relationship between the interventions local protocols and best-practice guidelines. Twenty-four nurses working in a psychiatric facility were interviewed about the nursing interventions they performed before, during, and after an episode of seclusion with or without using restraint. Analysis of the data reveals that the interventions meet quality standards. However, nursing practice would be further refined by conducting post-event reviews, especially by discussing how a clients aggressive behaviour is to be understood.
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DYNC2H1 mutations cause asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy and short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2009
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Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) is an autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by short ribs and a narrow thorax, short long bones, inconstant polydactyly, and trident acetabular roof. ATD is closely related to the short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRP) type III, which is a more severe condition characterized by early prenatal expression and lethality and variable malformations. We first excluded IFT80 in a series of 26 fetuses and children belonging to 14 families diagnosed with either ATD or SRP type III. Studying a consanguineous family from Morocco, we mapped an ATD gene to chromosome 11q14.3-q23.1 in a 20.4 Mb region and identified homozygous mutations in the cytoplasmic dynein 2 heavy chain 1 (DYNC2H1) gene in the affected children. Compound heterozygosity for DYNC2H1 mutations was also identified in four additional families. Among the five families, 3/5 were diagnosed with ATD and 2/5 included pregnancies terminated for SRP type III. DYNC2H1 is a component of a cytoplasmic dynein complex and is directly involved in the generation and maintenance of cilia. From this study, we conclude that ATD and SRP type III are variants of a single disorder belonging to the ciliopathy group.
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Beneficial unintended effects of a cereal cystatin in transgenic lines of potato, Solanum tuberosum.
BMC Plant Biol.
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Studies reported unintended pleiotropic effects for a number of pesticidal proteins ectopically expressed in transgenic crops, but the nature and significance of such effects in planta remain poorly understood. Here we assessed the effects of corn cystatin II (CCII), a potent inhibitor of C1A cysteine (Cys) proteases considered for insect and pathogen control, on the leaf proteome and pathogen resistance status of potato lines constitutively expressing this protein.
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Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.
J. Proteome Res.
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Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets.
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Predictive validity and psychiatric nursing staffs perception of the clinical usefulness of the French version of the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
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This study seeks to evaluate the predictive validity of the French version of the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression (DASAfr) and psychiatric nurses perceptions of the clinical usefulness of the scale. The study was conducted in a 12-bed psychiatric intensive care unit in a large adult general psychiatric hospital. We found that the total score on the DASAfr has acceptable predictive accuracy for aggression against others and against staff and for seclusion with restraints; predictive accuracy was poorer for aggression against objects. Moreover, the nurses though the scale would be useful to their practice; and, indeed, the team still uses the DASAfr.
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Linear ubiquitination of NEMO negatively regulates the interferon antiviral response through disruption of the MAVS-TRAF3 complex.
Cell Host Microbe
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The RIG-I/Mda5 sensors recognize viral intracellular RNA and trigger host antiviral responses. RIG-I signals through the adaptor protein MAVS, which engages various TRAF family members and results in type I interferon (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokine production via activation of IRFs and NF-?B, respectively. Both the IRF and NF-?B pathways also require the adaptor protein NEMO. We determined that the RIG-I pathway is differentially regulated by the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC), which consists of the E3 ligases HOIL-1L, HOIP, and the accessory protein SHARPIN. LUBAC downregulated virus-mediated IFN induction by targeting NEMO for linear ubiquitination. Linear ubiquitinated NEMO associated with TRAF3 and disrupted the MAVS-TRAF3 complex, which inhibited IFN activation while stimulating NF-?B-dependent signaling. In SHARPIN-deficient MEFs, vesicular stomatitis virus replication was decreased due to increased IFN production. Linear ubiquitination thus switches NEMO from a positive to a negative regulator of RIG-I signaling, resulting in an attenuated IFN response.
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Multimodal protein constructs for herbivore insect control.
Toxins (Basel)
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Transgenic plants expressing combinations of microbial or plant pesticidal proteins represent a promising tool for the efficient, durable control of herbivorous insects. In this review we describe current strategies devised for the heterologous co-expression of pesticidal proteins in planta, some of which have already shown usefulness in plant protection. Emphasis is placed on protein engineering strategies involving the insertion of single DNA constructs within the host plant genome. Multimodal fusion proteins integrating complementary pesticidal functions along a unique polypeptide are first considered, taking into account the structural constraints associated with protein or protein domain grafting to biologically active proteins. Strategies that allow for the co- or post-translational release of two or more pesticidal proteins are then considered, including polyprotein precursors releasing free proteins upon proteolytic cleavage, and multicistronic transcripts for the parallel translation of single protein-encoding mRNA sequences.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.