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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Plasma From Patients With HELLP Syndrome Increases Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability.
Reprod Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2014
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Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(?)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction.
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Postischemic reperfusion causes smooth muscle calcium sensitization and vasoconstriction of parenchymal arterioles.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are high-resistance vessels in the brain that connect pial vessels to the microcirculation. We previously showed that PAs have increased vasoconstriction after ischemia and reperfusion that could increase perfusion deficit. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms by which early postischemic reperfusion causes increased vasoconstriction of PAs.
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Increased pressure-induced tone in rat parenchymal arterioles vs. middle cerebral arteries: role of ion channels and calcium sensitivity.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
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Brain parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are high-resistance vessels that branch off pial arteries and perfuse the brain parenchyma. PAs are the target of cerebral small vessel disease and have been shown to have greater pressure-induced tone at lower pressures than pial arteries. We investigated mechanisms by which brain PAs have increased myogenic tone compared with middle cerebral arteries (MCAs), focusing on differences in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) calcium and ion channel function. The amount of myogenic tone and VSM calcium was measured using Fura 2 in isolated and pressurized PAs and MCAs. Increases in intraluminal pressure caused larger increases in tone and cytosolic calcium in PAs compared with MCAs. At 50 mmHg, myogenic tone was 37 ± 5% for PAs vs. 6.5 ± 4% for MCAs (P < 0.01), and VSM calcium was 200 ± 20 nmol/l in PAs vs. 104 ± 15 nmol/l in MCAs (P < 0.01). In vessels permeabilized with Staphylococcus aureus ?-toxin, PAs were not more sensitive to calcium, suggesting calcium sensitization was not at the level of the contractile apparatus. PAs were 30-fold more sensitive to the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine than MCAs (EC50 for PAs was 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. 82.1 ± 2.1 nmol/l for MCAs;P < 0.01); however, electrophysiological properties of the VDCC were not different in VSM. PAs had little to no response to the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin, whereas MCAs constricted ?15%. Thus increased myogenic tone in PAs appears related to differences in ion channel activity that promotes VSM membrane depolarization but not to a direct sensitization of the contractile apparatus to calcium.
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Vitamin D alters genes involved in follicular development and steroidogenesis in human cumulus granulosa cells.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Vitamin D deficiency is common among reproductive-aged women and has a role in female reproduction.
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Magnesium Sulfate Treatment Reverses Seizure Susceptibility and Decreases Neuroinflammation in a Rat Model of Severe Preeclampsia.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Eclampsia, defined as unexplained seizure in a woman with preeclampsia, is a life-threatening complication of pregnancy with unclear etiology. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is the leading eclamptic seizure prophylactic, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized severe preeclampsia is a state of increased seizure susceptibility due to blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neuroinflammation that lowers seizure threshold. Further, MgSO4 decreases seizure susceptibility by protecting the BBB and preventing neuroinflammation. To model severe preeclampsia, placental ischemia (reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure; RUPP) was combined with a high cholesterol diet (HC) to cause maternal endothelial dysfunction. RUPP+HC rats developed symptoms associated with severe preeclampsia, including hypertension, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and fetal and placental growth restriction. Seizure threshold was determined by quantifying the amount of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ; mg/kg) required to elicit seizure in RUPP+HC±MgSO4 and compared to normal pregnant controls (n?=?6/group; gestational day 20). RUPP+HC rats were more sensitive to PTZ with seizure threshold being ?65% lower vs. control (12.4±1.7 vs. 36.7±3.9 mg/kg PTZ; p<0.05) that was reversed by MgSO4 (45.7±8.7 mg/kg PTZ; p<0.05 vs. RUPP+HC). BBB permeability to sodium fluorescein, measured in-vivo (n?=?5-7/group), was increased in RUPP+HC vs. control rats, with more tracer passing into the brain (15.9±1.0 vs. 12.2±0.3 counts/gram ×1000; p<0.05) and was unaffected by MgSO4 (15.6±1.0 counts/gram ×1000; p<0.05 vs. controls). In addition, RUPP+HC rats were in a state of neuroinflammation, indicated by 35±2% of microglia being active compared to 9±2% in normal pregnancy (p<0.01; n?=?3-8/group). MgSO4 treatment reversed neuroinflammation, reducing microglial activation to 6±2% (p<0.01 vs. RUPP+HC). Overall, RUPP+HC rats were in a state of augmented seizure susceptibility potentially due to increased BBB permeability and neuroinflammation. MgSO4 treatment reversed this, increasing seizure threshold and decreasing neuroinflammation, without affecting BBB permeability. Thus, reducing neuroinflammation may be one mechanism by which MgSO4 prevents eclampsia during severe preeclampsia.
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Myogenic Tone as a Therapeutic Target for Ischemic Stroke.
Curr Vasc Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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Ischemic stroke causes vascular paralysis and impaired autoregulation in the brain, the degree of which is dependent on the depth and duration of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Ischemic stroke also impairs myogenic response of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) that may be an underlying mechanism by which autoregulation is impaired. Myogenic responses are affected by I/R through several mechanisms, including production of peroxynitrite, depolymerization of F-actin in vascular smooth muscle, and circulating vasoactive factors. The vascular endothelium is also significantly affected during focal ischemia that has a particularly large influence on vascular tone in the cerebral circulation. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are important endothelium-dependent of vasoactive substances that can influence the level of myogenic tone in cerebral arteries and arterioles that are significantly affected during ischemic stroke. Unlike MCA, brain penetrating arterioles have considerable myogenic tone that appears less affected by focal ischemia. The persistent tone of brain parenchymal arterioles during focal ischemia could contribute to perfusion deficit and infarct expansion. These arterioles within the cerebral cortex are also unique from MCA in that they constrict to small- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SKCa and IKCa, respectively) inhibition, suggesting basal endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF) is preserved during focal ischemia. This review will highlight our current understanding of the effects of I/R on myogenic response in both MCA and parenchymal arterioles and discuss underlying mechanisms by which focal ischemia affects myogenic tone in these different vascular segments.
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Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2013
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We investigated the effect of hypertension on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), a major target of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and determined whether relaxin is a treatment for SVD during hypertension. PAs were isolated from 18-wk-old female normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), and SHRs treated with human relaxin 2 for 14 d (4 ?g/h; n=8/group) and studied using a pressurized arteriograph system. Hypertension reduced PA inner diameter (58±3 vs. 49±3 ?m at 60 mmHg in WKY rats, P<0.05), suggesting inward remodeling that was reversed by relaxin (56±4 ?m, P<0.05). Relaxin also increased PA distensibility in SHRs (34±2 vs. 10±2% in SHRs, P<0.05). Relaxin was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (110±30 pg/ml) after systemic administration, suggesting that it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Relaxin receptors (RXFP1/2) were not detected in cerebral vasculature, but relaxin increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression in brain cortex. Inhibition of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (axitinib, 4 mg/kg/d, 14 d) had no effect on increased distensibility with relaxin, but caused outward hypertrophic remodeling of PAs from SHRs. These results suggest that relaxin crosses the BBB and activates MMP-2 in brain cortex, which may interact with PAs to increase distensibility. VEGF appears to be involved in remodeling of PAs, but not relaxin-induced increased distensibility.
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Mechanisms of enhanced basal tone of brain parenchymal arterioles during early postischemic reperfusion: role of ET-1-induced peroxynitrite generation.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2013
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The contributions of vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1 (ET-1), peroxynitrite) and endothelium-dependent vasodilatory mechanisms to basal tone were investigated in parenchymal arterioles (PAs) after early postischemic reperfusion. Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) was induced for 2 hours with 30 minutes reperfusion in male Wistar rats and compared with ischemia alone (permanent MCAO (pMCAO); 2.5 hours) or sham controls. Changes in lumen diameter of isolated and pressurized PAs were compared. Quantitative PCR was used to measure endothelin type B (ETB) receptors. Constriction to intravascular pressure (basal tone) was not affected by tMCAO or pMCAO. However, constriction to inhibitors of endothelial cell, small- (SK) and intermediate- (IK) conductance, Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels (apamin and TRAM-34, respectively) were significantly enhanced in PAs from tMCAO compared with pMCAO or sham. Addition of the ETB agonist sarafotoxin caused constriction in PAs from tMCAO but not from sham animals (21 ± 4% versus 3 ± 3% at 1 nmol/L; P<0.01) that was inhibited by the peroxynitrite scavenger FeTMPyP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphinato iron (III) chloride) (100 ?mol/L). Expression of ETB receptors was not found on PA smooth muscle, suggesting that constriction to sarafotoxin after tMCAO was due to peroxynitrite and not ETB receptor expression. The maintenance of basal tone in PAs after tMCAO may restrict flow to the ischemic region and contribute to infarct expansion.
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Effect of pregnancy and nitric oxide on the myogenic vasodilation of posterior cerebral arteries and the lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation.
Reprod Sci
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Hemorrhage during parturition can lower blood pressure beyond the lower limit of cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation that can cause ischemic brain injury. However, the impact of pregnancy on the lower limit of CBF autoregulation is unknown. We measured myogenic vasodilation, a major contributor of CBF autoregulation, in isolated posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) from nonpregnant and late-pregnant rats (n = 10/group) while the effect of pregnancy on the lower limit of CBF autoregulation was studied in the posterior cerebral cortex during controlled hemorrhage (n = 8). Pregnancy enhanced myogenic vasodilation in PCA and shifted the lower limit of CBF autoregulation to lower pressures. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) prevented the enhanced myogenic vasodilation during pregnancy but did not affect the lower limit of CBF autoregulation. The shift in the autoregulatory curve to lower pressures during pregnancy is likely protective of ischemic injury during hemorrhage and appears to be independent of NOS.
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The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy: mechanisms and consequences.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy is unique from other vascular beds. Most notably, the growth and vasodilatory response to high levels of circulating growth factors and cytokines that promote substantial hemodynamic changes in other vascular beds is limited in the cerebral circulation. This is accomplished through several mechanisms, including downregulation of key receptors and transcription factors, and production of circulating factors that counteract the vasodilatory effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor. Pregnancy both prevents and reverses hypertensive inward remodeling of cerebral arteries, possibly through downregulation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) importantly adapts to pregnancy by preventing the passage of seizure provoking serum into the brain and limiting the permeability effects of VEGF that is more highly expressed in cerebral vasculature during pregnancy. While the adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy provides for relatively normal cerebral blood flow and BBB properties in the face of substantial cardiovascular changes and high levels of circulating factors, under pathologic conditions, these adaptations appear to promote greater brain injury, including edema formation during acute hypertension, and greater sensitivity to bacterial endotoxin.
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Pregnancy causes diminished myogenic tone and outward hypotrophic remodeling of the cerebral vein of Galen.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2013
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Pregnancy increases the risk of several complications associated with the cerebral veins, including thrombosis and hemorrhage. In contrast to the cerebral arteries and arterioles, few studies have focused on the effect of pregnancy on the cerebral venous side. Here, we investigated for the first time the effect of pregnancy on the function and structure of the cerebral vein of Galen in rats. Our major finding was that cerebral veins from late-pregnant (LP, n=11) rats had larger lumen diameters and thinner walls than veins from nonpregnant (NP, n=13) rats, indicating that pregnancy caused outward hypotrophic remodeling of the vein of Galen. Moreover, veins from NP animals had a small amount of myogenic tone at 10 mm?Hg (3.9±1.0%) that was diminished in veins during pregnancy (0.8±0.3%; P<0.01). However, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation of the veins was unchanged during pregnancy. Using immunohistochemistry, we show that the vein of Galen receives perivascular innervation, and that serotonergic innervation of cerebral veins is significantly higher in veins from LP animals. Outward hypotrophic remodeling and diminished tone of cerebral veins during pregnancy may contribute to the development of venous pathology through elevated wall tension and wall stress, and possibly by promoting venous blood stasis.
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Inhibition of PPAR? during rat pregnancy causes intrauterine growth restriction and attenuation of uterine vasodilation.
Front Physiol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) activity is thought to have a major role in preeclampsia through abnormal placental development. However, the role of PPAR? in adaptation of the uteroplacental vasculature that may lead to placental hypoperfusion and fetal growth restriction during pregnancy is not known. Here, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 11/group) were treated during the second half of pregnancy with the PPAR? inhibitor GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day in food) or vehicle. Pregnancy outcome and PPAR? mRNA, vasodilation and structural remodeling were determined in maternal uterine and mesenteric arteries. PPAR? was expressed in uterine vascular tissue of both non-pregnant and pregnant rats with ~2-fold greater expression in radial vs. main uterine arteries. PPAR? mRNA levels were significantly higher in uterine compared to mesenteric arteries. GW9662 treatment during pregnancy did not affect maternal physiology (body weight, glucose, blood pressure), mesenteric artery vasodilation or structural remodeling of uterine and mesenteric vessels. Inhibition of PPAR? for the last 10 days of gestation caused decreased fetal weights on both day 20 and 21 of gestation that was associated with impaired vasodilation of radial uterine arteries in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. These results define an essential role of PPAR? in the control of uteroplacental vasodilatory function during pregnancy, an important determinant of blood flow to the placenta and fetus. Strategies that target PPAR? activation in the uterine circulation could have important therapeutic potential in treatment of pregnancies complicated by hypertension, diabetes or preeclampsia.
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Vascular Protection Following Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion.
J Neurol Neurophysiol
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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Despite considerable research that has contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of stroke, translation of this knowledge into effective therapies has largely failed. The only effective treatment for ischemic stroke is rapid recanalization of an occluded vessel by dissolving the clot with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, stroke adversely affects vascular function as well that can cause secondary brain injury and limit treatment that depends on a patent vasculature. In middle cerebral arteries (MCA), ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) cause loss of myogenic tone, vascular paralysis, and endothelial dysfunction that can lead to loss of autoregulation. In contrast, brain parenchymal arterioles retain considerable tone during I/R that likely contributes to expansion of the infarct into the penumbra. Microvascular dysregulation also occurs during ischemic stroke that causes edema and hemorrhage, exacerbating the primary insult. Ischemic injury of vasculature is progressive with longer duration of I/R. Early postischemic reperfusion has beneficial effects on stroke outcome but can impair vascular function and exacerbate ischemic injury after longer durations of I/R. This review focuses on current knowledge on the effects of I/R on the structure and function of different vascular segments in the brain and highlight some of the more promising targets for vascular protection.
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The adaptation of the blood-brain barrier to vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor during pregnancy.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2011
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Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PLGF) are increased in the maternal circulation during pregnancy. These factors may increase blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, yet brain edema does not normally occur during pregnancy. We therefore hypothesized that in pregnancy, the BBB adapts to high levels of these permeability factors. We investigated the influence of pregnancy-related circulating factors on VEGF-induced BBB permeability by perfusing cerebral veins with plasma from nonpregnant (NP) or late-pregnant (LP) rats (n=6/group) and measuring permeability in response to VEGF. The effect of VEGF, PLGF, and VEGF-receptor (VEGFR) activation on BBB permeability was also determined. Results showed that VEGF significantly increased permeability (×10(7) ?m(3)/min) from 9.7 ± 3.5 to 21.0 ± 1.5 (P<0.05) in NP veins exposed to NP plasma, that was prevented when LP veins were exposed to LP plasma; (9.7±3.8; P>0.05). Both LP plasma and soluble FMS-like tyrosine-kinase 1 (sFlt1) in NP plasma abolished VEGF-induced BBB permeability in NP veins (9.5±2.9 and 12±2.6; P>0.05). PLGF significantly increased BBB permeability in NP plasma (18±1.4; P<0.05), and required only VEGFR1 activation, whereas VEGF-induced BBB permeability required both VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. Our findings suggest that VEGF and PLGF enhance BBB permeability through different VEGFR pathways and that circulating sFlt1 prevents VEGF- and PLGF-induced BBB permeability during pregnancy.
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Inhibition of protein kinase C? reverses increased blood-brain barrier permeability during hyperglycemic stroke and prevents edema formation in vivo.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
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We investigated the effect of circulating factors and protein kinase C? on blood-brain barrier permeability and edema during hyperglycemic stroke.
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Differential effects of low-dose endotoxin on the cerebral circulation during pregnancy.
Reprod Sci
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2011
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It is well-known that the pregnant state is associated with increased sensitivity to endotoxin in renal and uterine circulations; however, the effects on the cerebral circulation are not known. Intravenous infusion of low-dose lipopolysaccharide ([LPS]; 1.5 ?g/kg) to pregnant Wistar rats on day 15 of pregnancy caused significantly decreased myogenic tone of posterior cerebral arteries on day 20, which was not seen in similarly treated nonpregnant rats. Pregnancy alone was associated with a 2-to 4-fold increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and interferon-? (IFN-?) messenger RNA (mRNA) in cerebral arteries compared to nonpregnant, suggesting that the cerebral circulation is in a state of inflammation during pregnancy. After LPS treatment, cerebral arteries from pregnant animals had increased iNOS and TNF-? compared to LPS-treated nonpregnant animals, but decreased interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IFN-?. These results demonstrate that pregnancy enhances sensitivity to the effects of LPS in the cerebral circulation, which may be due to an enhanced inflammatory state during pregnancy.
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Relaxin causes selective outward remodeling of brain parenchymal arterioles via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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Brain parenchymal arterioles (PAs), but not pial arteries, undergo hypotrophic outward remodeling during pregnancy that involves peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) activation. Relaxin, a peptide hormone produced during pregnancy, is involved in systemic and renal artery remodeling and activates PPAR? in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that relaxin is involved in the selective outward remodeling of PAs through a PPAR?-dependent mechanism. Nonpregnant rats were treated with relaxin (4 ?g/h, osmotic minipump), relaxin plus PPAR? inhibitor GW9662 (10 mg/kg/d), or vehicle for 10 d. Vascular function and structure were compared in isolated and pressurized middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) and PAs taken from the same animals. Relaxin treatment increased serum relaxin to the level of pregnancy (54 ng/ml) and increased passive wall thickness (hypertrophy; 70 ± 5 vs. 54 ± 4 ?m in vehicle; P<0.05) and inner diameter (outward remodeling; 10.6 ± 0.5 vs. 8.0 ± 0.6 ?m in vehicle; P<0.05) in PAs, but not in MCAs. This hypertrophic outward remodeling was prevented by GW9662 that had diameters (57 ± 3 ?m) and wall thickness (8.6 ± 1.0 ?m) similar to vehicle. GW9662 also prevented relaxin-induced changes in PPAR? target gene expression. These results suggest that relaxin produced during pregnancy may be partly responsible for selective remodeling of PAs during pregnancy through a mechanism involving PPAR?
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Cerebral vascular adaptation to pregnancy and its role in the neurological complications of eclampsia.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2010
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The cerebral circulation has a central role in mediating the neurological complications of eclampsia, yet our understanding of how pregnancy and preeclampsia affect this circulation is severely limited. Here, we show that pregnancy causes outward remodeling of penetrating arterioles and increased capillary density in the brain due to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?), a transcription factor involved in cerebrovascular remodeling and highly activated in pregnancy. Pregnancy-induced PPAR? activation also significantly affected cerebral hemodynamics, decreasing vascular resistance and increasing cerebral blood flow by ?40% in response to acute hypertension that caused breakthrough of autoregulation. These structural and hemodynamic changes in the brain during pregnancy were associated with substantially increased blood-brain barrier permeability, an effect that could promote passage of damaging proteins into the brain and cause the neurological complications of eclampsia, including seizure.
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Plasma from preeclamptic women increases blood-brain barrier permeability: role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2010
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Circulating factors in preeclamptic women are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and thereby contribute to the progression of this hypertensive condition. Despite the involvement of neurological complications in preeclampsia, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of circulating factors on cerebrovascular function. Using a rat model of pregnancy, we investigated blood-brain barrier permeability, myogenic activity, and the influence of endothelial vasodilator mechanisms in cerebral vessels exposed intraluminally to plasma from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. In addition, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mediating changes in permeability in response to plasma was investigated. A 3-hour exposure to 20% normal pregnant or preeclamptic plasma increased blood-brain barrier permeability by ?6.5- and 18.0-fold, respectively, compared with no plasma exposure (P<0.01). Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinase activity prevented the increase in permeability in response to preeclamptic plasma but had no effect on changes in permeability of vessels exposed to normal pregnant plasma. Circulating factors in preeclamptic plasma did not affect myogenic activity or the influence of endothelium on vascular tone. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to preeclamptic plasma has little effect on reactivity of cerebral arteries but significantly increases blood-brain barrier permeability. Prevention of increased permeability by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling suggests that activation of this pathway may be responsible for increased blood-brain barrier permeability after exposure to preeclamptic plasma.
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Roles of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and myofilament Ca2+ sensitization in age-dependent cerebrovascular myogenic tone.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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In light of evidence that immature arteries contain a higher proportion of noncontractile smooth muscle cells than found in fully differentiated mature arteries, the present study explored the hypothesis that age-related differences in the smooth muscle phenotype contribute to age-related differences in contractility. Because Ca(2+) handling differs markedly between contractile and noncontractile smooth muscle, the present study specifically tested the hypothesis that the relative contributions of Ca(2+) influx and myofilament sensitization to myogenic tone are upregulated, whereas Ca(2+) release is downregulated, in immature [14 days postnatal (P14)] compared with mature (6 mo old) rat middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). Myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity measured in ?-escin-permeabilized arteries increased with pressure in P14 but not adult MCAs. Cyclopiazonic acid (an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) increased diameter and reduced Ca(2+) in adult MCAs but increased diameter with no apparent change in Ca(2+) in P14 MCAs. La(3+) (Ca(2+) influx inhibitor) increased diameter and decreased Ca(2+) in adult MCAs, but in P14 MCAs, La(3+) increased diameter with no apparent change in Ca(2+). After treatment with both La(3+) and CPA, diameters were passive in both adult and P14 MCAs, but Ca(2+) was decreased only in adult MCAs. To quantify the fraction of smooth muscle cells in the fully differentiated contractile phenotype, extents of colocalization between smooth muscle ?-actin and SM2 myosin heavy chain were determined and found to be at least twofold greater in adult than pup MCAs. These data suggest that compared with adult MCAs, pup MCAs contain a greater proportion of noncontractile smooth muscle and, as a consequence, rely more on myofilament Ca(2+) sensitization and Ca(2+) influx to maintain myogenic reactivity. The inability of La(3+) to reduce cytosolic Ca(2+) in the pup MCA appears due to La(3+)-insensitive noncontractile smooth muscle cells, which contribute to the spatially averaged measurements of Ca(2+) but not contraction.
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Effect of hyperglycemia on brain penetrating arterioles and cerebral blood flow before and after ischemia/reperfusion.
Transl Stroke Res
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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The effect of preexisiting hyperglycemia on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain penetrating arterioles before and after 2 h of ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion was determined. Male Wistar rats that were either hyperglycemic (50 mg/kg streptozotocin; n=24) or normoglycemic (n=24) were subjected to transient ischemia by filament occlusion or nonischemic. CBF was measured prior to ischemia using microspheres and during transient ischemia using laser Doppler. Edema was compared by wet/dry weights. Constriction to apamin, TRAM-34, and L-NNA, inhibitors of small- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK and IK) and nitric oxide, were compared in penetrating arterioles from the ischemic hemisphere to investigate changes in basal tone and endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses. Preexisiting hyperglycemia did not affect CBF in non-ischemic animals or after transient ischemia; however, edema was significantly greater. Ischemia and reperfusion caused decreased basal tone in penetrating arterioles similarly in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic animals that was restored by apamin, and further increased by TRAM-34 and L-NNA. The restoration of tone in penetrating arterioles by apamin and TRAM-34 suggests that transient ischemia activates SK and IK channels in penetrating arterioles. This effect of ischemia was not different between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic animals, suggesting that it was related to ischemia and reperfusion rather than hyperglycemia.
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PPAR{gamma} activation prevents hypertensive remodeling of cerebral arteries and improves vascular function in female rats.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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Previous studies have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a ligand-activated transcription factor expressed in vascular cells, is protective of the vasculature. We hypothesized that activation of PPARgamma could prevent hypertensive remodeling of cerebral arteries and improve vascular function.
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The effect of ovariectomy and estrogen on penetrating brain arterioles and blood-brain barrier permeability.
Microcirculation
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2009
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We investigated the effect of estrogen replacement on the structure and function of penetrating brain arterioles (PA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.
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Resistance artery adaptation to pregnancy counteracts the vasoconstricting influence of plasma from normal pregnant women.
Reprod Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2009
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Using a rat model, we investigated the effects of circulating factors in pregnancy on cerebrovascular and systemic vascular function by comparing myogenic reactivity, tone, and endothelial vasodilator production of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and mesenteric artery (MA) of nonpregnant (NP) animals perfused with nonpregnant and pregnant human plasma. Arteries from late pregnant (LP) animals were then perfused similarly to evaluate a potential adaptive effect of pregnancy on vessel function. A 3-hour exposure to pregnant plasma caused increased myogenic reactivity and tone in vessels from NP animals and produced a decreased endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor response in NP PCAs, findings that were not seen with MAs. The increased reactivity and tone noted in NP vessels was abolished when pregnant plasma was perfused through LP arteries, suggesting these vessels adapt during pregnancy to the vasoconstricting influence of pregnant plasma.
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PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone reverses increased cerebral venous hydraulic conductivity during hypertension.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists have been shown to protect the cerebral vasculature, including the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone on changes in venous permeability during chronic hypertension induced by nitric oxide synthase inhibition. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were either treated with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 0.5 g/l in drinking water) for 5 wk (HTN; n = 8), L-NAME for 5 wk plus the PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone (20 mg/kg in food) for the last 3 wk (HTN + Rosi; n = 5), L-NAME for 5 wk plus the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol (1 mmol/l in drinking water) for the last 3 wk (HTN + Tempol; n = 8), or were untreated controls (n = 9). Fluid filtration (J(v)/S) and hydraulic conductivity (L(p)) of cerebral veins were compared in vitro between groups after a step increase in pressure from 10 to 25 mmHg to mimic the change in hydrostatic pressure during acute hypertension. Hypertension increased J(v)/S by 2.2-fold and L(p) by 3.2-fold. Rosiglitazone treatment after 2 wk of hypertension completely reversed the increased J(v)/S and L(p) that occurred during hypertension, whereas Tempol had no effect. These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone was effective at reversing changes in venous permeability that occurred during chronic hypertension, an effect that does not appear to be related to its antioxidant properties. Our findings suggest that PPAR-gamma may be a key regulator of blood-brain barrier permeability and a potential therapeutic target during hypertension.
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SKCa and IKCa Channels, myogenic tone, and vasodilator responses in middle cerebral arteries and parenchymal arterioles: effect of ischemia and reperfusion.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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The role of SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channels in myogenic tone and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) responsiveness was investigated under control conditions and after ischemia and reperfusion in parenchymal arterioles (PA) versus middle cerebral arteries (MCA).
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Magnesium sulfate for the treatment of eclampsia: a brief review.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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Magnesium sulfate is used extensively for prevention of eclamptic seizures. Empirical and clinical evidence supports the effectiveness of magnesium sulfate; however, questions remain as to its safety and mechanism. This review summarizes current evidence supporting the possible mechanisms of action and several controversies for magnesium sulfate treatment.
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Increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein causes blood-brain barrier disruption in early-onset preeclampsia through LOX-1.
FASEB J.
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Early-onset preeclampsia (EPE) is a severe form of preeclampsia that involves life-threatening neurological complications. However, the underlying mechanism by which EPE affects the maternal brain is not known. We hypothesized that plasma from women with EPE increases blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability vs. plasma from women with late-onset preeclampsia (LPE) or normal pregnancy (NP) and investigated its underlying mechanism by perfusing cerebral veins from nonpregnant rats (n=6-7/group) with human plasma from women with EPE, LPE, or NP and measuring permeability. We show that plasma from women with EPE significantly increased BBB permeability vs. plasma from women with LPE or NP (P<0.001). BBB disruption in response to EPE plasma was due to a 260% increase of circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL) binding to its receptor, LOX-1, and subsequent generation of peroxynitrite (P<0.001). A rat model with pathologically high lipid levels in pregnancy showed symptoms of preeclampsia, including elevated blood pressure, growth-restricted fetuses, and LOX-1-dependent BBB disruption, similar to EPE (P<0.05). Thus, we have identified LOX-1 activation by oxLDL and subsequent peroxynitrite generation as a novel mechanism by which disruption of the BBB occurs in EPE. As increased BBB permeability is a primary means by which seizure and other neurological symptoms ensue, our findings highlight oxLDL, LOX-1, and peroxynitrite as important therapeutic targets in EPE.
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Pregnancy enhances the effects of hypercholesterolemia on posterior cerebral arteries.
Reprod Sci
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In preeclampsia, hyperlipidemia is enhanced compared to normal pregnancy that could adversely affect vascular function. In the cerebral vasculature, this could lead to dysregulation of cerebral blood flow and neurological complications. Here, we examined the effect of excessive hyperlipidemia, as seen in preeclampsia, on cerebral artery function and expression of inflammatory markers in pregnancy. Pregnant and nonpregnant rats received a 14-day high-cholesterol diet or normal chow and posterior cerebral artery function was compared. High cholesterol significantly increased sensitivity of posterior cerebral arteries to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside that was accompanied by a ~12-fold increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in late-pregnant rats only. Further, high cholesterol significantly increased peroxynitrite-induced dilation and decreased myogenic tone in cerebral arteries from late pregnant compared to nonpregnant animals. These results suggest that pathologically high levels of cholesterol in pregnancy enhance inflammatory responses and peroxynitrite generation in cerebral arteries.
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Acute rosiglitazone treatment during reperfusion after hyperglycemic stroke is neuroprotective not vascular protective.
Transl Stroke Res
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Reperfusion therapy for ischemic stroke can cause secondary brain injury, especially under hyperglycemic (HG) conditions. Here we investigated the effect of acute treatment with rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-?) agonist, prior to postischemic reperfusion, on stroke outcome during HG stroke. Male Wistar rats that were either normoglycemic (NG) or HG by STZ (50 mg/kg; for 5-6 days) underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 hours with 2 hours of reperfusion. Animals were treated i.v. with rosiglitazone (1mg/kg; n=16), rosiglitazone (1mg/kg) + the free radical scavenger Tempol (50mg/kg; n=10) or vehicle (n=16) ten minutes prior to reperfusion and infarct volume, edema formation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured. Compared to NG, HG stroke significantly increased infarct volume from 5.2±3.0% vs. 14.7±3.6% (p<0.05). Rosiglitazone prevented the increased infarct volume induced by HG that was only 6.9±2.0% (p<0.05 vs. HG) but did not have any effect on edema formation that was increased by 3.0% in both HG vehicle and rosiglitazone-treated ipsilateral vs. contralateral hemispheres (p<0.05). Combined treatment of rosiglitazone + Tempol did not significantly change brain water content that remained 2.2% greater than contralateral (p<0.05), but reversed the neuroprotective properties of rosiglitazone in HG MCAO animals such that infarct volume was 14.3±4.4% (p>0.05 vs. vehicle). The lack of an effect of combined treatment of rosiglitazone + Temple may be due to a decrease in reperfusion CBF that was only 60% of baseline (p<0.01) compared to 82% and 89% for HG vehicle and rosiglitazone treated animals (p>0.05). In conclusion, acute rosiglitazone treatment prior reperfusion was neuroprotective but not vascular protective during HG stroke.
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Effect of pregnancy on autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in anterior versus posterior cerebrum.
Hypertension
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Severe preeclampsia and eclampsia are associated with brain edema that forms preferentially in the posterior cerebral cortex possibly because of decreased sympathetic innervation of posterior cerebral arteries and less effective autoregulation during acute hypertension. In the present study, we examined the effect of pregnancy on the effectiveness of cerebral blood flow autoregulation using laser Doppler flowmetry and edema formation by wet:dry weight in acute hypertension induced by phenylephrine infusion in the anterior and posterior cerebrum from nonpregnant (n=8) and late-pregnant (n=6) Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the effect of pregnancy on sympathetic innervation by tyrosine hydroxylase staining of posterior and middle cerebral arteries (n=5-6 per group) and endothelial and neuronal NO synthase expression using quantitative PCR (n=3 per group). In nonpregnant animals, there was no difference in autoregulation between the anterior and posterior cerebrum. However, in late-pregnant animals, the threshold of cerebral blood flow autoregulation was shifted to lower pressures in the posterior cerebrum, which was associated with increased neuronal NO synthase expression in the posterior cerebral cortex versus anterior. Compared with the nonpregnant state, pregnancy increased the threshold of autoregulation in both brain regions that was related to decreased expression of endothelial NO synthase. Lastly, acute hypertension during pregnancy caused greater edema formation in both brain cortices that was not attributed to changes in sympathetic innervation. These findings suggest that, although pregnancy shifted the cerebral blood flow autoregulatory curve to higher pressures in both the anterior and posterior cortices, it did not protect from edema during acute hypertension.
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Determination of PPAR? activity in adipose tissue and spleen.
J Immunoassay Immunochem
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Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR?) is a nuclear transcription factor that regulates many genes and is involved in extensive biological functions. Accurately determining PPAR? activity in various tissues is important to understanding mechanisms of human physiology and pathophysiology. Thus, we evaluated a PPAR? DNA binding immunoassay using nuclear extracts of spleen and adipose tissue from rats treated with rosiglitazone (20 mg/kg in food, seven days, n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6) and compared the results to mRNA expression of PPAR? target genes--a well-established method to investigate PPAR? activity. In adipose tissue, the PPAR? immunoassay showed that rosiglitazone did not change PPAR? binding, but qPCR analysis showed that expression of two PPAR? target genes, CD36 and liver X receptor-?, were significantly increased. In spleen, the PPAR? immunoassay showed that rosiglitazone decreased PPAR? binding, but qPCR analysis showed no significant change. The different results obtained between PPAR? binding immunoassay and target gene expression suggest that PPAR? immunoassays may not be suitable when used with fresh homogenates of spleen and adipose tissue. Validation of the assay with each individual tissue is recommended.
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Peroxynitrite decomposition with FeTMPyP improves plasma-induced vascular dysfunction and infarction during mild but not severe hyperglycemic stroke.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
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We investigated mechanisms by which circulating factors during hyperglycemic (HG) stroke affect cerebrovascular function and the role of peroxynitrite in stroke outcome. Middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) were isolated from male Wistar rats and perfused with plasma from rats that were hyperglycemic for 5 to 6 days by streptozotocin and underwent either MCA occlusion (HG MCAO) or Sham surgery (HG Sham) compared with MCA perfused with physiologic saline (No plasma). Myogenic responses and endothelial function were compared in untreated MCA (n=8/group) or with inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (apocynin; n=8), peroxynitrite (FeTMPyP; n=8) or endothelin-1 (ET-1)(A) (BQ-123; n=8). Finally, animals were treated in vivo before reperfusion after mild (<68% cerebral blood flow (CBF) decrease) or severe (>68% CBF decrease) MCAO with FeTMPyP (n=12) or vehicle (n=12) and CBF and infarction measured. The HG MCAO plasma increased tone in MCA versus No plasma (P<0.05) that was reversed by FeTMPyP, but not by apocynin or BQ-123. The HG Sham plasma also increased tone in MCA (P<0.05) that was reversed by BQ-123 only. In vivo, FeTMPyP was neuroprotective during mild, but not severe ischemia. These results show that circulating factors in plasma can affect cerebrovascular function through peroxynitrite generation and ET-1. In addition, peroxynitrite decomposition improves stroke outcome acutely during mild, but not severe HG ischemia.
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Pregnant serum induces neuroinflammation and seizure activity via TNF?.
Exp. Neurol.
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Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that affects many organs including the brain. Neurological complications occur during preeclampsia, the most serious of which is seizure known as eclampsia. Although preeclampsia can precede the eclamptic seizure, it often occurs during normal pregnancy, suggesting that processes associated with normal pregnancy can promote neuronal excitability. Here we investigated whether circulating inflammatory mediators that are elevated late in gestation when seizure also occurs are hyperexcitable to neuronal tissue. Evoked field potentials were measured in hippocampal slices in which control horse serum that slices are normally grown in, was replaced with serum from nonpregnant or late-pregnant Wistar rats for 48 h. We found that serum from pregnant, but not nonpregnant rats, caused hyperexcitability to hippocampal neurons and seizure activity that was abrogated by inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) signaling. Additionally, application of TNF? mimicked this increased excitability. Pregnant serum also caused morphological changes in microglia characteristic of activation, and increased TNF? mRNA expression that was not seen with exposure to nonpregnant serum. However, TNF? protein was not found to be elevated in pregnant serum itself, suggesting that other circulating factors during pregnancy caused activation of hippocampal slice cells to produce a TNF?-mediated increase in neuronal excitability. Lastly, although pregnant serum caused neuroinflammation and hyperexcitability of hippocampal slices, it did not increase blood-brain barrier permeability, nor were pregnant rats from which the serum was taken undergoing seizure. Thus, the BBB has an important role in protecting the brain from circulating neuroinflammatory mediators that are hyperexcitable to the brain during pregnancy. These studies provide novel insight into the underlying cause of eclampsia without elevated blood pressure and the protective role of the BBB that prevents exposure of the brain to hyperexcitable factors.
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Cerebrovascular dysfunction and blood-brain barrier permeability induced by oxidized LDL are prevented by apocynin and magnesium sulfate in female rats.
J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.
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Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is elevated during several neurologic conditions that involve cerebral edema formation, including severe preeclampsia and eclampsia; however, our understanding of its effect on the cerebral vasculature is limited. We hypothesized that oxLDL induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and changes in cerebrovascular reactivity occurs through NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. We also investigated the effect of MgSO4 on oxLDL-induced changes in the cerebral vasculature as this is commonly used in preventing cerebral edema formation. Posterior cerebral arteries (PCA) from female rats were perfused with 5µg/mL oxLDL in rat serum with or without 50µM apocynin or 16mM MgSO4 and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. oxLDL increased BBB permeability and decreased myogenic tone that were prevented by apocynin. oxLDL increased constriction to the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NNA that was unaffected by apocynin. oxLDL enhanced dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside that was prevented by apocynin. MgSO4 prevented oxLDL-induced BBB permeability without affecting oxLDL-induced changes in myogenic tone. Thus, oxLDL appears to cause BBB disruption and vascular tone dysregulation through NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. These results highlight oxLDL and NADPH oxidase as potentially important therapeutic targets in neurologic conditions that involve elevated oxLDL.
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