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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Factors limiting the spread of the protective symbiont Hamiltonella defensa in Aphis craccivora Aphids.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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Many insects are associated with heritable symbionts that mediate ecological interactions, including host protection against natural enemies. The cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora, is a polyphagous pest that harbors Hamiltonella defensa, which defends against parasitic wasps. Despite this protective benefit, this symbiont occurs only at intermediate frequencies in field populations. To identify factors constraining H. defensa invasion in Ap. craccivora, we estimated symbiont transmission rates, performed fitness assays, and measured infection dynamics in population cages to evaluate effects of infection. Similar to results with the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, we found no consistent costs to infection using component fitness assays, but we did identify clear costs to infection in population cages when no enemies were present. Maternal transmission rates of H. defensa in Ap. craccivora were high (ca. 99%) but not perfect. Transmission failures and infection costs likely limit the spread of protective H. defensa in Ap. craccivora. We also characterized several parameters of H. defensa infection potentially relevant to the protective phenotype. We confirmed the presence of H. defensa in aphid hemolymph, where it potentially interacts with endoparasites, and performed real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) to estimate symbiont and phage abundance during aphid development. We also examined strain variation of H. defensa and its bacteriophage at multiple loci, and despite our lines being collected in different regions of North America, they were infected with a nearly identical strains of H. defensa and APSE4 phage. The limited strain diversity observed for these defensive elements may result in relatively static protection profile for this defensive symbiosis.
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Almost there: transmission routes of bacterial symbionts between trophic levels.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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Many intracellular microbial symbionts of arthropods are strictly vertically transmitted and manipulate their hosts reproduction in ways that enhance their own transmission. Rare horizontal transmission events are nonetheless necessary for symbiont spread to novel host lineages. Horizontal transmission has been mostly inferred from phylogenetic studies but the mechanisms of spread are still largely a mystery. Here, we investigated transmission of two distantly related bacterial symbionts--Rickettsia and Hamiltonella--from their host, the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, to three species of whitefly parasitoids: Eretmocerus emiratus, Eretmocerus eremicus and Encarsia pergandiella. We also examined the potential for vertical transmission of these whitefly symbionts between parasitoid generations. Using florescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy we found that Rickettsia invades Eretmocerus larvae during development in a Rickettsia-infected host, persists in adults and in females, reaches the ovaries. However, Rickettsia does not appear to penetrate the oocytes, but instead is localized in the follicular epithelial cells only. Consequently, Rickettsia is not vertically transmitted in Eretmocerus wasps, a result supported by diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In contrast, Rickettsia proved to be merely transient in the digestive tract of Encarsia and was excreted with the meconia before wasp pupation. Adults of all three parasitoid species frequently acquired Rickettsia via contact with infected whiteflies, most likely by feeding on the host hemolymph (host feeding), but the rate of infection declined sharply within a few days of wasps being removed from infected whiteflies. In contrast with Rickettsia, Hamiltonella did not establish in any of the parasitoids tested, and none of the parasitoids acquired Hamiltonella by host feeding. This study demonstrates potential routes and barriers to horizontal transmission of symbionts across trophic levels. The possible mechanisms that lead to the differences in transmission of species of symbionts among species of hosts are discussed.
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Do trade-offs have explanatory power for the evolution of organismal interactions?
Evolution
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The concept of a trade-off has long played a prominent role in understanding the evolution of organismal interactions such as mutualism, parasitism, and competition. Given the complexity inherent to interactions between different evolutionary entities, ecological factors may especially limit the power of trade-off models to predict evolutionary change. Here, we use four case studies to examine the importance of ecological context for the study of trade-offs in organismal interactions: (1) resource-based mutualisms, (2) parasite transmission and virulence, (3) plant biological invasions, and (4) host range evolution in parasites and parasitoids. In the first two case studies, mechanistic trade-off models have long provided a strong theoretical framework but face the challenge of testing assumptions under ecologically realistic conditions. Work under the second two case studies often has a strong ecological grounding, but faces challenges in identifying or quantifying the underlying genetic mechanism of the trade-off. Attention is given to recent studies that have bridged the gap between evolutionary mechanism and ecological realism. Finally, we explore the distinction between ecological factors that mask the underlying evolutionary trade-offs, and factors that actually change the trade-off relationship between fitness-related traits important to organismal interactions.
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DO TRADE-OFFS HAVE EXPLANATORY POWER FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ORGANISMAL INTERACTIONS?
Evolution
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The concept of a trade-off has long played a prominent role in understanding the evolution of organismal interactions such as mutualism, parasitism and competition. Given the complexity inherent to interactions between different evolutionary entities, ecological factors may especially limit the power of trade-off models to predict evolutionary change. Here, we use four case studies to examine the importance of ecological context for the study of trade-offs in organismal interactions: (1) resource-based mutualisms, (2) parasite transmission and virulence, (3) plant biological invasions, and (4) host range evolution in parasites and parasitoids. In the first two case studies, mechanistic trade-off models have long provided a strong theoretical framework but face the challenge of testing assumptions under ecologically realistic conditions. Work under the second two case studies often has a strong ecological grounding, but faces challenges in identifying or quantifying the underlying genetic mechanism of the trade-off. Attention is given to recent studies that have bridged the gap between evolutionary mechanism and ecological realism. Finally, we explore the distinction between ecological factors that mask the underlying evolutionary trade-offs, and factors that actually change the trade-off relationship between fitness-related traits important to organismal interactions. 2012 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.
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Worldwide Populations of the Aphid Aphis craccivora Are Infected with Diverse Facultative Bacterial Symbionts.
Microb. Ecol.
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Facultative bacterial endosymbionts can play an important role in the evolutionary trajectory of their hosts. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are infected with a wide variety of facultative endosymbionts that can confer ecologically relevant traits, which in turn may drive microevolutionary processes in a dynamic selective environment. However, relatively little is known about how symbiont diversity is structured in most aphid species. Here, we investigate facultative symbiont species richness and prevalence among worldwide populations of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch. We surveyed 44 populations of A. craccivora, and detected 11 strains of facultative symbiotic bacteria, representing six genera. There were two significant associations between facultative symbiont and aphid food plant: the symbiont Arsenophonus was found at high prevalence in A. craccivora populations collected from Robinia sp. (locust), whereas the symbiont Hamiltonella was almost exclusively found in A. craccivora populations from Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Aphids collected from these two food plants also had divergent mitochondrial haplotypes, potentially indicating the formation of specialized aphid lineages associated with food plant (host-associated differentiation). The role of facultative symbionts in this process remains to be determined. Overall, observed facultative symbiont prevalence in A. craccivora was lower than that of some other well-studied aphids (e.g., Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum), possibly as a consequence of A. craccivoras almost purely parthenogenetic life history. Finally, most (70 %) of the surveyed populations were polymorphic for facultative symbiont infection, indicating that even when symbiont prevalence is relatively low, symbiont-associated phenotypic variation may allow population-level evolutionary responses to local selection.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.