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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
CCDC88B is a novel regulator of maturation and effector functions of T cells during pathological inflammation.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2014
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We used a genome-wide screen in mutagenized mice to identify genes which inactivation protects against lethal neuroinflammation during experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). We identified an ECM-protective mutation in coiled-coil domain containing protein 88b (Ccdc88b), a poorly annotated gene that is found expressed specifically in spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and thymus. The CCDC88B protein is abundantly expressed in immune cells, including both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and in myeloid cells, and loss of CCDC88B protein expression has pleiotropic effects on T lymphocyte functions, including impaired maturation in vivo, significantly reduced activation, reduced cell division as well as impaired cytokine production (IFN-? and TNF) in response to T cell receptor engagement, or to nonspecific stimuli in vitro, and during the course of P. berghei infection in vivo. This identifies CCDC88B as a novel and important regulator of T cell function. The human CCDC88B gene maps to the 11q13 locus that is associated with susceptibility to several inflammatory and auto-immune disorders. Our findings strongly suggest that CCDC88B is the morbid gene underlying the pleiotropic effect of the 11q13 locus on inflammation.
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The effect on melanoma risk of genes previously associated with telomere length.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2014
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Telomere length has been associated with risk of many cancers, but results are inconsistent. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with mean leukocyte telomere length were either genotyped or well-imputed in 11108 case patients and 13933 control patients from Europe, Israel, the United States and Australia, four of the seven SNPs reached a P value under .05 (two-sided). A genetic score that predicts telomere length, derived from these seven SNPs, is strongly associated (P = 8.92x10(-9), two-sided) with melanoma risk. This demonstrates that the previously observed association between longer telomere length and increased melanoma risk is not attributable to confounding via shared environmental effects (such as ultraviolet exposure) or reverse causality. We provide the first proof that multiple germline genetic determinants of telomere length influence cancer risk.
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Meta-analysis of SHANK Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: a gradient of severity in cognitive impairments.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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SHANK genes code for scaffold proteins located at the post-synaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. In neurons, SHANK2 and SHANK3 have a positive effect on the induction and maturation of dendritic spines, whereas SHANK1 induces the enlargement of spine heads. Mutations in SHANK genes have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but their prevalence and clinical relevance remain to be determined. Here, we performed a new screen and a meta-analysis of SHANK copy-number and coding-sequence variants in ASD. Copy-number variants were analyzed in 5,657 patients and 19,163 controls, coding-sequence variants were ascertained in 760 to 2,147 patients and 492 to 1,090 controls (depending on the gene), and, individuals carrying de novo or truncating SHANK mutations underwent an extensive clinical investigation. Copy-number variants and truncating mutations in SHANK genes were present in ?1% of patients with ASD: mutations in SHANK1 were rare (0.04%) and present in males with normal IQ and autism; mutations in SHANK2 were present in 0.17% of patients with ASD and mild intellectual disability; mutations in SHANK3 were present in 0.69% of patients with ASD and up to 2.12% of the cases with moderate to profound intellectual disability. In summary, mutations of the SHANK genes were detected in the whole spectrum of autism with a gradient of severity in cognitive impairment. Given the rare frequency of SHANK1 and SHANK2 deleterious mutations, the clinical relevance of these genes remains to be ascertained. In contrast, the frequency and the penetrance of SHANK3 mutations in individuals with ASD and intellectual disability-more than 1 in 50-warrant its consideration for mutation screening in clinical practice.
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Fine mapping of eight psoriasis susceptibility loci.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49?239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P=2.94 × 10(-74)), rs6924962 (P=3.21 × 10(-19)) and rs892666 (P=1.11 × 10(-10)). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P=7.42 × 10(-16)) and rs918518 (P=3.22 × 10(-11)). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P=4.15 × 10(-13)), IL13 (rs1295685; P=1.65 × 10(-7)), IL23A (rs61937678; P=1.82 × 10(-7)) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P=5.90 × 10(-7)) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 3 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.172.
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Global genetic variations predict brain response to faces.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Face expressions are a rich source of social signals. Here we estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance in the brain response to facial expressions explained by common genetic variance captured by ? 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using genomic-relationship-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML), we related this global genetic variance to that in the brain response to facial expressions, as assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a community-based sample of adolescents (n = 1,620). Brain response to facial expressions was measured in 25 regions constituting a face network, as defined previously. In 9 out of these 25 regions, common genetic variance explained a significant proportion of phenotypic variance (40-50%) in their response to ambiguous facial expressions; this was not the case for angry facial expressions. Across the network, the strength of the genotype-phenotype relationship varied as a function of the inter-individual variability in the number of functional connections possessed by a given region (R(2) = 0.38, p<0.001). Furthermore, this variability showed an inverted U relationship with both the number of observed connections (R2 = 0.48, p<0.001) and the magnitude of brain response (R(2) = 0.32, p<0.001). Thus, a significant proportion of the brain response to facial expressions is predicted by common genetic variance in a subset of regions constituting the face network. These regions show the highest inter-individual variability in the number of connections with other network nodes, suggesting that the genetic model captures variations across the adolescent brains in co-opting these regions into the face network.
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Common and rare variant analysis in early-onset bipolar disorder vulnerability.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
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Bipolar disorder is one of the most common and devastating psychiatric disorders whose mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite a strong genetic contribution demonstrated by twin and adoption studies, a polygenic background influences this multifactorial and heterogeneous psychiatric disorder. To identify susceptibility genes on a severe and more familial sub-form of the disease, we conducted a genome-wide association study focused on 211 patients of French origin with an early age at onset and 1,719 controls, and then replicated our data on a German sample of 159 patients with early-onset bipolar disorder and 998 controls. Replication study and subsequent meta-analysis revealed two genes encoding proteins involved in phosphoinositide signalling pathway (PLEKHA5 and PLCXD3). We performed additional replication studies in two datasets from the WTCCC (764 patients and 2,938 controls) and the GAIN-TGen cohorts (1,524 patients and 1,436 controls) and found nominal P-values both in the PLCXD3 and PLEKHA5 loci with the WTCCC sample. In addition, we identified in the French cohort one affected individual with a deletion at the PLCXD3 locus and another one carrying a missense variation in PLCXD3 (p.R93H), both supporting a role of the phosphatidylinositol pathway in early-onset bipolar disorder vulnerability. Although the current nominally significant findings should be interpreted with caution and need replication in independent cohorts, this study supports the strategy to combine genetic approaches to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder.
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Human leukocyte antigen class II variants and adult-onset asthma: does occupational allergen exposure play a role?
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2014
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Recently, a locus centred on rs9273349 in the HLA-DQ region emerged from genome-wide association studies of adult-onset asthma. We aimed to further investigate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II in adult-onset asthma and a possible interaction with occupational exposures. We imputed classical HLA-II alleles from 7579 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 6025 subjects (1202 with adult-onset asthma) from European cohorts: ECRHS, SAPALDIA, EGEA and B58C, and from surveys of bakers and agricultural workers. Based on an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix, 2629 subjects had ever been exposed to high molecular weight (HMW) allergens. We explored associations between 23 common HLA-II alleles and adult-onset asthma, and tested for gene-environment interaction with occupational exposure to HMW allergens. Interaction was also tested for rs9273349. Marginal associations of classical HLA-II alleles and adult-onset asthma were not statistically significant. Interaction was detected between the DPB1*03:01 allele and exposure to HMW allergens (p = 0.009), in particular to latex (p = 0.01). In the unexposed group, the DPB1*03:01 allele was associated with adult-onset asthma (OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.53-0.86). HMW allergen exposures did not modify the association of rs9273349 with adult-onset asthma. Common classical HLA-II alleles were not marginally associated with adult-onset asthma. The association of latex exposure and adult-onset asthma may be modified by DPB1*03:01.
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Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.
Zhaoming Wang, Bin Zhu, Mingfeng Zhang, Hemang Parikh, Jinping Jia, Charles C Chung, Joshua N Sampson, Jason W Hoskins, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, Abdisamad Ibrahim, Christopher Hautman, Preethi S Raj, Christian C Abnet, Andrew A Adjei, Anders Ahlbom, Demetrius Albanes, Naomi E Allen, Christine B Ambrosone, Melinda Aldrich, Pilar Amiano, Christopher Amos, Ulrika Andersson, Gerald Andriole, Irene L Andrulis, Cecilia Arici, Alan A Arslan, Melissa A Austin, Dalsu Baris, Donald A Barkauskas, Bryan A Bassig, Laura E Beane Freeman, Christine D Berg, Sonja I Berndt, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Richard B Biritwum, Amanda Black, William Blot, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Boffetta, Kelly Bolton, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Paige M Bracci, Paul Brennan, Louise A Brinton, Michelle Brotzman, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Julie E Buring, Mary Ann Butler, Qiuyin Cai, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Federico Canzian, Guangwen Cao, Neil E Caporaso, Alfredo Carrato, Tania Carreon, Angela Carta, Gee-Chen Chang, I-Shou Chang, Jenny Chang-Claude, Xu Che, Chien-Jen Chen, Chih-Yi Chen, Chung-Hsing Chen, Constance Chen, Kuan-Yu Chen, Yuh-Min Chen, Anand P Chokkalingam, Lisa W Chu, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Graham A Colditz, Joanne S Colt, David Conti, Michael B Cook, Victoria K Cortessis, E David Crawford, Olivier Cussenot, Faith G Davis, Immaculata De Vivo, Xiang Deng, Ti Ding, Colin P Dinney, Anna Luisa Di Stefano, W Ryan Diver, Eric J Duell, Joanne W Elena, Jin-Hu Fan, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Maria Feychting, Jonine D Figueroa, Adrienne M Flanagan, Joseph F Fraumeni, Neal D Freedman, Brooke L Fridley, Charles S Fuchs, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Steven Gallinger, Yu-Tang Gao, Susan M Gapstur, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Reina Garcia-Closas, Julie M Gastier-Foster, J Michael Gaziano, Daniela S Gerhard, Carol A Giffen, Graham G Giles, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Nalan Gokgoz, Alisa M Goldstein, Carlos González, Richard Gorlick, Mark H Greene, Myron Gross, H Barton Grossman, Robert Grubb, Jian Gu, Peng Guan, Christopher A Haiman, Göran Hallmans, Susan E Hankinson, Curtis C Harris, Patricia Hartge, Claudia Hattinger, Richard B Hayes, Qincheng He, Lee Helman, Brian E Henderson, Roger Henriksson, Judith Hoffman-Bolton, Chancellor Hohensee, Elizabeth A Holly, Yun-Chul Hong, Robert N Hoover, H Dean Hosgood, Chin-Fu Hsiao, Ann W Hsing, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Nan Hu, Wei Hu, Zhibin Hu, Ming-Shyan Huang, David J Hunter, Peter D Inskip, Hidemi Ito, Eric J Jacobs, Kevin B Jacobs, Mazda Jenab, Bu-Tian Ji, Christoffer Johansen, Mattias Johansson, Alison Johnson, Rudolf Kaaks, Ashish M Kamat, Aruna Kamineni, Margaret Karagas, Chand Khanna, Kay-Tee Khaw, Christopher Kim, In-Sam Kim, Jin Hee Kim, Yeul Hong Kim, Young-Chul Kim, Young Tae Kim, Chang Hyun Kang, Yoo Jin Jung, Cari M Kitahara, Alison P Klein, Robert Klein, Manolis Kogevinas, Woon-Puay Koh, Takashi Kohno, Laurence N Kolonel, Charles Kooperberg, Christian P Kratz, Vittorio Krogh, Hideo Kunitoh, Robert C Kurtz, Nilgun Kurucu, Qing Lan, Mark Lathrop, Ching C Lau, Fernando Lecanda, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Maxwell P Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Seth P Lerner, Donghui Li, Linda M Liao, Wei-Yen Lim, Dongxin Lin, Jie Lin, Sara Lindstrom, Martha S Linet, Jolanta Lissowska, Jianjun Liu, Börje Ljungberg, Josep Lloreta, Daru Lu, Jing Ma, Nuria Malats, Satu Mannisto, Neyssa Marina, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Keitaro Matsuo, Katherine A McGlynn, Roberta Mckean-Cowdin, Lorna H McNeill, Robert R McWilliams, Beatrice S Melin, Paul S Meltzer, James E Mensah, Xiaoping Miao, Dominique S Michaud, Alison M Mondul, Lee E Moore, Kenneth Muir, Shelley Niwa, Sara H Olson, Nick Orr, Salvatore Panico, Jae Yong Park, Alpa V Patel, Ana Patiño-García, Sofia Pavanello, Petra H M Peeters, Beata Peplonska, Ulrike Peters, Gloria M Petersen, Piero Picci, Malcolm C Pike, Stefano Porru, Jennifer Prescott, Xia Pu, Mark P Purdue, You-Lin Qiao, Preetha Rajaraman, Elio Riboli, Harvey A Risch, Rebecca J Rodabough, Nathaniel Rothman, Avima M Ruder, Jeong-Seon Ryu, Marc Sanson, Alan Schned, Fredrick R Schumacher, Ann G Schwartz, Kendra L Schwartz, Molly Schwenn, Katia Scotlandi, Adeline Seow, Consol Serra, Massimo Serra, Howard D Sesso, Gianluca Severi, Hongbing Shen, Min Shen, Sanjay Shete, Kouya Shiraishi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Afshan Siddiq, Luis Sierrasesúmaga, Sabina Sierri, Alan Dart Loon Sihoe, Debra T Silverman, Matthias Simon, Melissa C Southey, Logan Spector, Margaret Spitz, Meir Stampfer, Pär Stattin, Mariana C Stern, Victoria L Stevens, Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon, Daniel O Stram, Sara S Strom, Wu-Chou Su, Malin Sund, Sook Whan Sung, Anthony Swerdlow, Wen Tan, Hideo Tanaka, Wei Tang, Ze-Zhang Tang, Adonina Tardón, Evelyn Tay, Philip R Taylor, Yao Tettey, David M Thomas, Roberto Tirabosco, Anne Tjonneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Jorge R Toro, Ruth C Travis, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Rebecca Troisi, Ann Truelove, Ying-Huang Tsai, Margaret A Tucker, Rosario Tumino, David Van Den Berg, Stephen K Van Den Eeden, Roel Vermeulen, Paolo Vineis, Kala Visvanathan, Ulla Vogel, Chaoyu Wang, Chengfeng Wang, Junwen Wang, Sophia S Wang, Elisabete Weiderpass, Stephanie J Weinstein, Nicolas Wentzensen, William Wheeler, Emily White, John K Wiencke, Alicja Wolk, Brian M Wolpin, Maria Pik Wong, Margaret Wrensch, Chen Wu, Tangchun Wu, Xifeng Wu, Yi-Long Wu, Jay S Wunder, Yong-Bing Xiang, Jun Xu, Hannah P Yang, Pan-Chyr Yang, Yasushi Yatabe, Yuanqing Ye, Edward D Yeboah, Zhihua Yin, Chen Ying, Chong-Jen Yu, Kai Yu, Jian-Min Yuan, Krista A Zanetti, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Wei Zheng, Baosen Zhou, Lisa Mirabello, Sharon A Savage, Peter Kraft, Stephen J Chanock, Meredith Yeager, Maria Terese Landi, Jianxin Shi, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Laufey T Amundadottir.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
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Rare and common variants in extracellular matrix gene Fibrillin 2 (FBN2) are associated with macular degeneration.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2014
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Neurodegenerative diseases affecting the macula constitute a major cause of incurable vision loss and exhibit considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, from early-onset monogenic disease to multifactorial late-onset age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As part of our continued efforts to define genetic causes of macular degeneration, we performed whole exome sequencing in four individuals of a two-generation family with autosomal dominant maculopathy and identified a rare variant p.Glu1144Lys in Fibrillin 2 (FBN2), a glycoprotein of the elastin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM). Sanger sequencing validated the segregation of this variant in the complete pedigree, including two additional affected and one unaffected individual. Sequencing of 192 maculopathy patients revealed additional rare variants, predicted to disrupt FBN2 function. We then undertook additional studies to explore the relationship of FBN2 to macular disease. We show that FBN2 localizes to Bruch's membrane and its expression appears to be reduced in aging and AMD eyes, prompting us to examine its relationship with AMD. We detect suggestive association of a common FBN2 non-synonymous variant, rs154001 (p.Val965Ile) with AMD in 10 337 cases and 11 174 controls (OR = 1.10; P-value = 3.79 × 10(-5)). Thus, it appears that rare and common variants in a single gene-FBN2-can contribute to Mendelian and complex forms of macular degeneration. Our studies provide genetic evidence for a key role of elastin microfibers and Bruch's membrane in maintaining blood-retina homeostasis and establish the importance of studying orphan diseases for understanding more common clinical phenotypes.
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Variation in genomic landscape of clear cell renal cell carcinoma across Europe.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing worldwide, and its prevalence is particularly high in some parts of Central Europe. Here we undertake whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of clear cell RCC (ccRCC), the most common form of the disease, in patients from four different European countries with contrasting disease incidence to explore the underlying genomic architecture of RCC. Our findings support previous reports on frequent aberrations in the epigenetic machinery and PI3K/mTOR signalling, and uncover novel pathways and genes affected by recurrent mutations and abnormal transcriptome patterns including focal adhesion, components of extracellular matrix (ECM) and genes encoding FAT cadherins. Furthermore, a large majority of patients from Romania have an unexpected high frequency of A:T>T:A transversions, consistent with exposure to aristolochic acid (AA). These results show that the processes underlying ccRCC tumorigenesis may vary in different populations and suggest that AA may be an important ccRCC carcinogen in Romania, a finding with major public health implications.
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Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2014
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We conducted imputation to the 1000 Genomes Project of four genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in populations of European ancestry (11,348 cases and 15,861 controls) and genotyped an additional 10,246 cases and 38,295 controls for follow-up. We identified large-effect genome-wide associations for squamous lung cancer with the rare variants BRCA2 p.Lys3326X (rs11571833, odds ratio (OR) = 2.47, P = 4.74 × 10(-20)) and CHEK2 p.Ile157Thr (rs17879961, OR = 0.38, P = 1.27 × 10(-13)). We also showed an association between common variation at 3q28 (TP63, rs13314271, OR = 1.13, P = 7.22 × 10(-10)) and lung adenocarcinoma that had been previously reported only in Asians. These findings provide further evidence for inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and its biological basis. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates that imputation can identify rare disease-causing variants with substantive effects on cancer risk from preexisting genome-wide association study data.
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Genetic variation in prostate-specific antigen-detected prostate cancer and the effect of control selection on genetic association studies.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2014
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Only a minority of the genetic components of prostate cancer risk have been explained. Some observed associations of SNPs with prostate cancer might arise from associations of these SNPs with circulating prostate-specific antigen (PSA) because PSA values are used to select controls.
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Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.
Joris Deelen, Marian Beekman, Hae-Won Uh, Linda Broer, Kristin L Ayers, Qihua Tan, Yoichiro Kamatani, Anna M Bennet, Riin Tamm, Stella Trompet, Daníel F Guðbjartsson, Friederike Flachsbart, Giuseppina Rose, Alexander Viktorin, Krista Fischer, Marianne Nygaard, Heather J Cordell, Paolina Crocco, Erik B van den Akker, Stefan Böhringer, Quinta Helmer, Christopher P Nelson, Gary I Saunders, Maris Alver, Karen Andersen-Ranberg, Marie E Breen, Ruud van der Breggen, Amke Caliebe, Miriam Capri, Elisa Cevenini, Joanna C Collerton, Serena Dato, Karen Davies, Ian Ford, Jutta Gampe, Paolo Garagnani, Eco J C de Geus, Jennifer Harrow, Diana van Heemst, Bastiaan T Heijmans, Femke-Anouska Heinsen, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Albert Hofman, Bernard Jeune, Palmi V Jonsson, Mark Lathrop, Doris Lechner, Carmen Martin-Ruiz, Susan E McNerlan, Evelin Mihailov, Alberto Montesanto, Simon P Mooijaart, Anne Murphy, Ellen A Nohr, Lavinia Paternoster, Iris Postmus, Fernando Rivadeneira, Owen A Ross, Stefano Salvioli, Naveed Sattar, Stefan Schreiber, Hreinn Stefansson, David J Stott, Henning Tiemeier, André G Uitterlinden, Rudi G J Westendorp, Gonneke Willemsen, Nilesh J Samani, Pilar Galán, Thorkild I A Sørensen, Dorret I Boomsma, J Wouter Jukema, Irene Maeve Rea, Giuseppe Passarino, Anton J M de Craen, Kaare Christensen, Almut Nebel, Kari Stefansson, Andres Metspalu, Patrik Magnusson, Hélène Blanché, Lene Christiansen, Thomas B L Kirkwood, Cornelia M van Duijn, Claudio Franceschi, Jeanine J Houwing-Duistermaat, P Eline Slagboom.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2014
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The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ? 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (? 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ? 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated.
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Fine mapping of genetic susceptibility loci for melanoma reveals a mixture of single variant and multiple variant regions.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2014
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At least 17 genomic regions are established as harboring melanoma susceptibility variants, in most instances with genome-wide levels of significance and replication in independent samples. Based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data augmented by imputation to the 1,000 Genomes reference panel, we have fine mapped these regions in over 5,000 individuals with melanoma (mainly from the GenoMEL consortium) and over 7,000 ethnically matched controls. A penalized regression approach was used to discover those SNP markers that most parsimoniously explain the observed association in each genomic region. For the majority of the regions, the signal is best explained by a single SNP, which sometimes, as in the tyrosinase region, is a known functional variant. However in five regions the explanation is more complex. At the CDKN2A locus, for example, there is strong evidence that not only multiple SNPs but also multiple genes are involved. Our results illustrate the variability in the biology underlying genome-wide susceptibility loci and make steps toward accounting for some of the "missing heritability."
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Rare missense variants in POT1 predispose to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2014
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Although CDKN2A is the most frequent high-risk melanoma susceptibility gene, the underlying genetic factors for most melanoma-prone families remain unknown. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a rare variant that arose as a founder mutation in the telomere shelterin gene POT1 (chromosome 7, g.124493086C>T; p.Ser270Asn) in five unrelated melanoma-prone families from Romagna, Italy. Carriers of this variant had increased telomere lengths and numbers of fragile telomeres, suggesting that this variant perturbs telomere maintenance. Two additional rare POT1 variants were identified in all cases sequenced in two separate Italian families, one variant per family, yielding a frequency for POT1 variants comparable to that for CDKN2A mutations in this population. These variants were not found in public databases or in 2,038 genotyped Italian controls. We also identified two rare recurrent POT1 variants in US and French familial melanoma cases. Our findings suggest that POT1 is a major susceptibility gene for familial melanoma in several populations.
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Global Genetic Architecture of an Erythroid Quantitative Trait Locus, HMIP-2.
Ann. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2014
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HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed "A" and "B." These typically occurred together ("A-B") on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for "A" and "B," we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only "A" or "B" were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The "A-B" combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene-environment interaction during human migration and adaptation.
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The nuclear factor I/A (NFIA) gene is associated with the asthma plus rhinitis phenotype.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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A previous genome-wide linkage scan in 295 families of the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA) showed strong evidence of linkage of the 1p31 region to the combined asthma plus allergic rhinitis (AR) phenotype.
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Oppositional COMT Val158Met effects on resting state functional connectivity in adolescents and adults.
Brain Struct Funct
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Prefrontal dopamine levels are relatively increased in adolescence compared to adulthood. Genetic variation of COMT (COMT Val158Met) results in lower enzymatic activity and higher dopamine availability in Met carriers. Given the dramatic changes of synaptic dopamine during adolescence, it has been suggested that effects of COMT Val158Met genotypes might have oppositional effects in adolescents and adults. The present study aims to identify such oppositional COMT Val158Met effects in adolescents and adults in prefrontal brain networks at rest. Resting state functional connectivity data were collected from cross-sectional and multicenter study sites involving 106 healthy young adults (mean age 24 ± 2.6 years), gender matched to 106 randomly chosen 14-year-olds. We selected the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC) as seed due to its important role as nexus of the executive control and default mode network. We observed a significant age-dependent reversal of COMT Val158Met effects on resting state functional connectivity between amPFC and ventrolateral as well as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus. Val homozygous adults exhibited increased and adolescents decreased connectivity compared to Met homozygotes for all reported regions. Network analyses underscored the importance of the parahippocampal gyrus as mediator of observed effects. Results of this study demonstrate that adolescent and adult resting state networks are dose-dependently and diametrically affected by COMT genotypes following a hypothetical model of dopamine function that follows an inverted U-shaped curve. This study might provide cues for the understanding of disease onset or dopaminergic treatment mechanisms in major neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
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A genome-wide association study of early-onset breast cancer identifies PFKM as a novel breast cancer gene and supports a common genetic spectrum for breast cancer at any age.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2014
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Early-onset breast cancer (EOBC) causes substantial loss of life and productivity, creating a major burden among women worldwide. We analyzed 1,265,548 Hapmap3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) among a discovery set of 3,523 EOBC incident cases and 2,702 population control women ages ? 51 years. The SNPs with smallest P values were examined in a replication set of 3,470 EOBC cases and 5,475 control women. We also tested EOBC association with 19,684 genes by annotating each gene with putative functional SNPs, and then combining their P values to obtain a gene-based P value. We examined the gene with smallest P value for replication in 1,145 breast cancer cases and 1,142 control women. The combined discovery and replication sets identified 72 new SNPs associated with EOBC (P < 4 × 10(-8)) located in six genomic regions previously reported to contain SNPs associated largely with later-onset breast cancer (LOBC). SNP rs2229882 and 10 other SNPs on chromosome 5q11.2 remained associated (P < 6 × 10(-4)) after adjustment for the strongest published SNPs in the region. Thirty-two of the 82 currently known LOBC SNPs were associated with EOBC (P < 0.05). Low power is likely responsible for the remaining 50 unassociated known LOBC SNPs. The gene-based analysis identified an association between breast cancer and the phosphofructokinase-muscle (PFKM) gene on chromosome 12q13.11 that met the genome-wide gene-based threshold of 2.5 × 10(-6). In conclusion, EOBC and LOBC seem to have similar genetic etiologies; the 5q11.2 region may contain multiple distinct breast cancer loci; and the PFKM gene region is worthy of further investigation. These findings should enhance our understanding of the etiology of breast cancer.
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Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery.
Yukinori Okada, Di Wu, Gosia Trynka, Towfique Raj, Chikashi Terao, Katsunori Ikari, Yuta Kochi, Koichiro Ohmura, Akari Suzuki, Shinji Yoshida, Robert R Graham, Arun Manoharan, Ward Ortmann, Tushar Bhangale, Joshua C Denny, Robert J Carroll, Anne E Eyler, Jeffrey D Greenberg, Joel M Kremer, Dimitrios A Pappas, Lei Jiang, Jian Yin, Lingying Ye, Ding-Feng Su, Jian Yang, Gang Xie, Ed Keystone, Harm-Jan Westra, Tonu Esko, Andres Metspalu, Xuezhong Zhou, Namrata Gupta, Daniel Mirel, Eli A Stahl, Dorothée Diogo, Jing Cui, Katherine Liao, Michael H Guo, Keiko Myouzen, Takahisa Kawaguchi, Marieke J H Coenen, Piet L C M van Riel, Mart A F J van de Laar, Henk-Jan Guchelaar, Tom W J Huizinga, Philippe Dieudé, Xavier Mariette, S Louis Bridges, Alexandra Zhernakova, René E M Toes, Paul P Tak, Corinne Miceli-Richard, So-Young Bang, Hye-Soon Lee, Javier Martín, Miguel A González-Gay, Luis Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Lisbeth Arlestig, Hyon K Choi, Yoichiro Kamatani, Pilar Galán, Mark Lathrop, , Steve Eyre, John Bowes, Anne Barton, Niek de Vries, Larry W Moreland, Lindsey A Criswell, Elizabeth W Karlson, Atsuo Taniguchi, Ryo Yamada, Michiaki Kubo, Jun S Liu, Sang-Cheol Bae, Jane Worthington, Leonid Padyukov, Lars Klareskog, Peter K Gregersen, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Barbara E Stranger, Philip L De Jager, Lude Franke, Peter M Visscher, Matthew A Brown, Hisashi Yamanaka, Tsuneyo Mimori, Atsushi Takahashi, Huji Xu, Timothy W Behrens, Katherine A Siminovitch, Shigeki Momohara, Fumihiko Matsuda, Kazuhiko Yamamoto, Robert M Plenge.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ?10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 101 (refs 2 - 4). We devised an in silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci and pathway analyses--as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency, haematological cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes--to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery.
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Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.
Valentina Escott-Price, Celine Bellenguez, Li-San Wang, Seung-Hoan Choi, Denise Harold, Lesley Jones, Peter Holmans, Amy Gerrish, Alexey Vedernikov, Alexander Richards, Anita L Destefano, Jean-Charles Lambert, Carla A Ibrahim-Verbaas, Adam C Naj, Rebecca Sims, Gyungah Jun, Joshua C Bis, Gary W Beecham, Benjamin Grenier-Boley, Giancarlo Russo, Tricia A Thornton-Wells, Nicola Denning, Albert V Smith, Vincent Chouraki, Charlene Thomas, M Arfan Ikram, Diana Zelenika, Badri N Vardarajan, Yoichiro Kamatani, Chiao-Feng Lin, Helena Schmidt, Brian Kunkle, Melanie L Dunstan, Maria Vronskaya, , Andrew D Johnson, Agustin Ruíz, Marie-Therese Bihoreau, Christiane Reitz, Florence Pasquier, Paul Hollingworth, Olivier Hanon, Annette L Fitzpatrick, Joseph D Buxbaum, Dominique Campion, Paul K Crane, Clinton Baldwin, Tim Becker, Vilmundur Gudnason, Carlos Cruchaga, David Craig, Najaf Amin, Claudine Berr, Oscar L Lopez, Philip L De Jager, Vincent Deramecourt, Janet A Johnston, Denis Evans, Simon Lovestone, Luc Letenneur, Isabel Hernández, David C Rubinsztein, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Kristel Sleegers, Alison M Goate, Nathalie Fiévet, Matthew J Huentelman, Michael Gill, Kristelle Brown, M Ilyas Kamboh, Lina Keller, Pascale Barberger-Gateau, Bernadette McGuinness, Eric B Larson, Amanda J Myers, Carole Dufouil, Stephen Todd, David Wallon, Seth Love, Ekaterina Rogaeva, John Gallacher, Peter St George-Hyslop, Jordi Clarimón, Alberto Lleó, Anthony Bayer, Debby W Tsuang, Lei Yu, Magda Tsolaki, Paola Bossù, Gianfranco Spalletta, Petra Proitsi, John Collinge, Sandro Sorbi, Florentino Sanchez Garcia, Nick C Fox, John Hardy, Maria Candida Deniz Naranjo, Paolo Bosco, Robert Clarke, Carol Brayne, Daniela Galimberti, Elio Scarpini, Ubaldo Bonuccelli, Michelangelo Mancuso, Gabriele Siciliano, Susanne Moebus, Patrizia Mecocci, Maria Del Zompo, Wolfgang Maier, Harald Hampel, Alberto Pilotto, Ana Frank-García, Francesco Panza, Vincenzo Solfrizzi, Paolo Caffarra, Benedetta Nacmias, William Perry, Manuel Mayhaus, Lars Lannfelt, Hakon Hakonarson, Sabrina Pichler, Minerva M Carrasquillo, Martin Ingelsson, Duane Beekly, Victoria Alvarez, Fanggeng Zou, Otto Valladares, Steven G Younkin, Eliecer Coto, Kara L Hamilton-Nelson, Wei Gu, Cristina Razquin, Pau Pastor, Ignacio Mateo, Michael J Owen, Kelley M Faber, Palmi V Jonsson, Onofre Combarros, Michael C O'Donovan, Laura B Cantwell, Hilkka Soininen, Deborah Blacker, Simon Mead, Thomas H Mosley, David A Bennett, Tamara B Harris, Laura Fratiglioni, Clive Holmes, Renée F A G de Bruijn, Peter Passmore, Thomas J Montine, Karolien Bettens, Jerome I Rotter, Alexis Brice, Kevin Morgan, Tatiana M Foroud, Walter A Kukull, Didier Hannequin, John F Powell, Michael A Nalls, Karen Ritchie, Kathryn L Lunetta, John S K Kauwe, Eric Boerwinkle, Matthias Riemenschneider, Mercè Boada, Mikko Hiltunen, Eden R Martin, Reinhold Schmidt, Dan Rujescu, Jean-Francois Dartigues, Richard Mayeux, Christophe Tzourio, Albert Hofman, Markus M Nöthen, Caroline Graff, Bruce M Psaty, Jonathan L Haines, Mark Lathrop, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Lenore J Launer, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Lindsay A Farrer, Cornelia M van Duijn, Alfredo Ramírez, Sudha Seshadri, Gerard D Schellenberg, Philippe Amouyel, Julie Williams.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls.
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Integration of sequence data from a Consanguineous family with genetic data from an outbred population identifies PLB1 as a candidate rheumatoid arthritis risk gene.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P = 0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF = 0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF = 0.021], combined P = 3.2 × 10(-6)). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P = 0.049 for C-alpha test and P = 0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted.
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Genetic heterogeneity of asthma phenotypes identified by a clustering approach.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2013
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The aim was to identify genetic variants associated with refined asthma phenotypes enabling to take into account multiple features of the disease.Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied in 3001 adults ever having asthma recruited in the frame of three epidemiological surveys (ECRHS, SAPALDIA, EGEA). Fourteen personal and phenotypic characteristics from questionnaires and clinical examination were used. A genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for each LCA-derived asthma phenotype, compared to subjects without asthma (n=3474).The LCA identified four adult asthma phenotypes, mainly characterized by the activity of the disease, the age of asthma onset and the atopic status. Associations of genome wide significance (<1.25×10-7) were observed between "active adult-onset non-allergic asthma" and rs9851461 flanking CD200 (3q13.2) and between "Inactive/mild non-allergic asthma" and rs2579931 flanking GRIK2 (6q16.3). Borderline significant results (2.5×10(-7)
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Altered IFN-?-Mediated Immunity and Transcriptional Expression Patterns in N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced STAT4 Mutants Confer Susceptibility to Acute Typhoid-like Disease.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2013
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Salmonella enterica is a ubiquitous Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that continues to pose a global challenge to human health. The etiology of Salmonella pathogenesis is complex and controlled by pathogen, environmental, and host genetic factors. In fact, patients immunodeficient in genes in the IL-12, IL-23/IFN-? pathway are predisposed to invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella infection. Using a forward genomics approach by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) germline mutagenesis in mice, we identified the Ity14 (Immunity to Typhimurium locus 14) pedigree exhibiting increased susceptibility following in vivo Salmonella challenge. A DNA-binding domain mutation (p.G418_E445) in Stat4 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Factor 4) was the causative mutation. STAT4 signals downstream of IL-12 to mediate transcriptional regulation of inflammatory immune responses. In mutant Ity14 mice, the increased splenic and hepatic bacterial load resulted from an intrinsic defect in innate cell function, IFN-?-mediated immunity, and disorganized granuloma formation. We further show that NK and NKT cells play an important role in mediating control of Salmonella in Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice. Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice had increased expression of genes involved in cell-cell interactions and communication, as well as increased CD11b expression on a subset of splenic myeloid dendritic cells, resulting in compromised recruitment of inflammatory cells to the spleen during Salmonella infection. Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) presented upregulated compensatory mechanisms, although inefficient and ultimately Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice develop fatal bacteremia. The following study further elucidates the pathophysiological impact of STAT4 during Salmonella infection.
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A genome-wide association study of atopic dermatitis identifies loci with overlapping effects on asthma and psoriasis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2013
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common dermatological disease of childhood. Many children with AD have asthma and AD shares regions of genetic linkage with psoriasis, another chronic inflammatory skin disease. We present here a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of childhood-onset AD in 1563 European cases with known asthma status and 4054 European controls. Using Illumina genotyping followed by imputation, we generated 268 034 consensus genotypes and in excess of 2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for analysis. Association signals were assessed for replication in a second panel of 2286 European cases and 3160 European controls. Four loci achieved genome-wide significance for AD and replicated consistently across all cohorts. These included the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) on chromosome 1, the genomic region proximal to LRRC32 on chromosome 11, the RAD50/IL13 locus on chromosome 5 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6; reflecting action of classical HLA alleles. We observed variation in the contribution towards co-morbid asthma for these regions of association. We further explored the genetic relationship between AD, asthma and psoriasis by examining previously identified susceptibility SNPs for these diseases. We found considerable overlap between AD and psoriasis together with variable coincidence between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of AD incorporates immune and epidermal barrier defects with combinations of specific and overlapping effects at individual loci.
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Mutations in BCAP31 cause a severe X-linked phenotype with deafness, dystonia, and central hypomyelination and disorganize the Golgi apparatus.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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BAP31 is one of the most abundant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins. It is a chaperone protein involved in several pathways, including ER-associated degradation, export of ER proteins to the Golgi apparatus, and programmed cell death. BAP31 is encoded by BCAP31, located in human Xq28 and highly expressed in neurons. We identified loss-of-function mutations in BCAP31 in seven individuals from three families. These persons suffered from motor and intellectual disabilities, dystonia, sensorineural deafness, and white-matter changes, which together define an X-linked syndrome. In the primary fibroblasts of affected individuals, we found that BCAP31 deficiency altered ER morphology and caused a disorganization of the Golgi apparatus in a significant proportion of cells. Contrary to what has been described with transient-RNA-interference experiments, we demonstrate that constitutive BCAP31 deficiency does not activate the unfolded protein response or cell-death effectors. Rather, our data demonstrate that the lack of BAP31 disturbs ER metabolism and impacts the Golgi apparatus, highlighting an important role for BAP31 in ER-to-Golgi crosstalk. These findings provide a molecular basis for a Mendelian syndrome and link intracellular protein trafficking to severe congenital brain dysfunction and deafness.
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Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2013
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Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3) and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289). Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3) and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.
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Global analysis of DNA methylation variation in adipose tissue from twins reveals links to disease-associated variants in distal regulatory elements.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2013
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Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play a key role in gene regulation and disease susceptibility. However, little is known about the genome-wide frequency, localization, and function of methylation variation and how it is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. We utilized the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource (MuTHER) and generated Illumina 450K adipose methylome data from 648 twins. We found that individual CpGs had low variance and that variability was suppressed in promoters. We noted that DNA methylation variation was highly heritable (h(2)median = 0.34) and that shared environmental effects correlated with metabolic phenotype-associated CpGs. Analysis of methylation quantitative-trait loci (metQTL) revealed that 28% of CpGs were associated with nearby SNPs, and when overlapping them with adipose expression quantitative-trait loci (eQTL) from the same individuals, we found that 6% of the loci played a role in regulating both gene expression and DNA methylation. These associations were bidirectional, but there were pronounced negative associations for promoter CpGs. Integration of metQTL with adipose reference epigenomes and disease associations revealed significant enrichment of metQTL overlapping metabolic-trait or disease loci in enhancers (the strongest effects were for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index [BMI]). We followed up with the BMI SNP rs713586, a cg01884057 metQTL that overlaps an enhancer upstream of ADCY3, and used bisulphite sequencing to refine this region. Our results showed widespread population invariability yet sequence dependence on adipose DNA methylation but that incorporating maps of regulatory elements aid in linking CpG variation to gene regulation and disease risk in a tissue-dependent manner.
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Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2013
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Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.
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Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis.
, Ashley H Beecham, Nikolaos A Patsopoulos, Dionysia K Xifara, Mary F Davis, Anu Kemppinen, Chris Cotsapas, Tejas S Shah, Chris Spencer, David Booth, An Goris, Annette Oturai, Janna Saarela, Bertrand Fontaine, Bernhard Hemmer, Claes Martin, Frauke Zipp, Sandra D'Alfonso, Filippo Martinelli-Boneschi, Bruce Taylor, Hanne F Harbo, Ingrid Kockum, Jan Hillert, Tomas Olsson, Maria Ban, Jorge R Oksenberg, Rogier Hintzen, Lisa F Barcellos, Cristina Agliardi, Lars Alfredsson, Mehdi Alizadeh, Carl Anderson, Robert Andrews, Helle Bach Søndergaard, Amie Baker, Gavin Band, Sergio E Baranzini, Nadia Barizzone, Jeffrey Barrett, Celine Bellenguez, Laura Bergamaschi, Luisa Bernardinelli, Achim Berthele, Viola Biberacher, Thomas M C Binder, Hannah Blackburn, Izaura L Bomfim, Paola Brambilla, Simon Broadley, Bruno Brochet, Lou Brundin, Dorothea Buck, Helmut Butzkueven, Stacy J Caillier, William Camu, Wassila Carpentier, Paola Cavalla, Elisabeth G Celius, Irène Coman, Giancarlo Comi, Lucia Corrado, Leentje Cosemans, Isabelle Cournu-Rebeix, Bruce A C Cree, Daniele Cusi, Vincent Damotte, Gilles Defer, Silvia R Delgado, Panos Deloukas, Alessia di Sapio, Alexander T Dilthey, Peter Donnelly, Bénédicte Dubois, Martin Duddy, Sarah Edkins, Irina Elovaara, Federica Esposito, Nikos Evangelou, Barnaby Fiddes, Judith Field, Andre Franke, Colin Freeman, Irene Y Frohlich, Daniela Galimberti, Christian Gieger, Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, Christiane Graetz, Andrew Graham, Verena Grummel, Clara Guaschino, Athena Hadjixenofontos, Hakon Hakonarson, Christopher Halfpenny, Gillian Hall, Per Hall, Anders Hamsten, James Harley, Timothy Harrower, Clive Hawkins, Garrett Hellenthal, Charles Hillier, Jeremy Hobart, Muni Hoshi, Sarah E Hunt, Maja Jagodic, Ilijas Jelcic, Angela Jochim, Brian Kendall, Allan Kermode, Trevor Kilpatrick, Keijo Koivisto, Ioanna Konidari, Thomas Korn, Helena Kronsbein, Cordelia Langford, Malin Larsson, Mark Lathrop, Christine Lebrun-Frenay, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Michelle H Lee, Maurizio A Leone, Virpi Leppä, Giuseppe Liberatore, Benedicte A Lie, Christina M Lill, Magdalena Lindén, Jenny Link, Felix Luessi, Jan Lycke, Fabio Macciardi, Satu Mannisto, Clara P Manrique, Roland Martin, Vittorio Martinelli, Deborah Mason, Gordon Mazibrada, Cristin McCabe, Inger-Lise Mero, Julia Mescheriakova, Loukas Moutsianas, Kjell-Morten Myhr, Guy Nagels, Richard Nicholas, Petra Nilsson, Fredrik Piehl, Matti Pirinen, Siân E Price, Hong Quach, Mauri Reunanen, Wim Robberecht, Neil P Robertson, Mariaemma Rodegher, David Rog, Marco Salvetti, Nathalie C Schnetz-Boutaud, Finn Sellebjerg, Rebecca C Selter, Catherine Schaefer, Sandip Shaunak, Ling Shen, Simon Shields, Volker Siffrin, Mark Slee, Per Soelberg Sorensen, Melissa Sorosina, Mireia Sospedra, Anne Spurkland, Amy Strange, Emilie Sundqvist, Vincent Thijs, John Thorpe, Anna Ticca, Pentti Tienari, Cornelia van Duijn, Elizabeth M Visser, Steve Vucic, Helga Westerlind, James S Wiley, Alastair Wilkins, James F Wilson, Juliane Winkelmann, John Zajicek, Eva Zindler, Jonathan L Haines, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Adrian J Ivinson, Graeme Stewart, David Hafler, Stephen L Hauser, Alastair Compston, Gil McVean, Philip De Jager, Stephen J Sawcer, Jacob L McCauley.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P < 1.0 × 10(-4)). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), 3 of which we found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants at 103 discrete loci outside of the major histocompatibility complex. With high-resolution Bayesian fine mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalog of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals.
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Genome-wide association study of multiple congenital heart disease phenotypes identifies a susceptibility locus for atrial septal defect at chromosome 4p16.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2013
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We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD). Our discovery cohort comprised 1,995 CHD cases and 5,159 controls and included affected individuals from each of the 3 major clinical CHD categories (with septal, obstructive and cyanotic defects). When all CHD phenotypes were considered together, no region achieved genome-wide significant association. However, a region on chromosome 4p16, adjacent to the MSX1 and STX18 genes, was associated (P = 9.5 × 10??) with the risk of ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) in the discovery cohort (N = 340 cases), and this association was replicated in a further 417 ASD cases and 2,520 controls (replication P = 5.0 × 10??; odds ratio (OR) in replication cohort = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.65; combined P = 2.6 × 10?¹?). Genotype accounted for ~9% of the population-attributable risk of ASD.
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A tool for RNA sequencing sample identity check.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2013
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RNA sequencing data are becoming a major method of choice to study transcriptomes, including the mapping of gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). RNA sample contamination or swapping is a serious problem for downstream analysis and may result in false discovery and lose power to detect the true biological relationships. When genetic data are available, for example, in eQTL studies or samples have been previously genotyped or DNA sequenced, it is possible to combine genetic data and RNA-seq data to detect sample contamination and resolve sample swapping problems. In this article, we introduce a tool (IDCheck) that allows easy assessment of concordance between genotype (from SNP arrays or DNA sequencing) and gene expression (RNA-seq) samples. IDCheck compares the identity of RNA-seq reads and SNP genotypes using a likelihood-based method. Based on maximum likelihood estimates of relevant parameters, we can detect sample contamination and identify correct sample pairs when swapping occurs. Our tool provides an efficient and convenient way to evaluate and resolve these problems.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pulmonary fibrosis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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We performed a genome-wide association study of non-Hispanic, white individuals with fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs; n = 1,616) and controls (n = 4,683), with follow-up replication analyses in 876 cases and 1,890 controls. We confirmed association with TERT at 5p15, MUC5B at 11p15 and the 3q26 region near TERC, and we identified seven newly associated loci (Pmeta = 2.4 × 10(-8) to 1.1 × 10(-19)), including FAM13A (4q22), DSP (6p24), OBFC1 (10q24), ATP11A (13q34), DPP9 (19p13) and chromosomal regions 7q22 and 15q14-15. Our results suggest that genes involved in host defense, cell-cell adhesion and DNA repair contribute to risk of fibrotic IIPs.
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A genome-wide search for common SNP x SNP interactions on the risk of venous thrombosis.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Venous Thrombosis (VT) is a common multifactorial disease with an estimated heritability between 35% and 60%. Known genetic polymorphisms identified so far only explain ~5% of the genetic variance of the disease. This study was aimed to investigate whether pair-wise interactions between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could exist and modulate the risk of VT.
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A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to approximately 2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (P ? 0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG; P < 5.0 × 10(-13) for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (P < 5.0 × 10(-6) ) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations.
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Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.
Lars G Fritsche, Wei Chen, Matthew Schu, Brian L Yaspan, Yi Yu, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Donald J Zack, Satoshi Arakawa, Valentina Cipriani, Stephan Ripke, Robert P Igo, Gabriëlle H S Buitendijk, Xueling Sim, Daniel E Weeks, Robyn H Guymer, Joanna E Merriam, Peter J Francis, Gregory Hannum, Anita Agarwal, Ana Maria Armbrecht, Isabelle Audo, Tin Aung, Gaetano R Barile, Mustapha Benchaboune, Alan C Bird, Paul N Bishop, Kari E Branham, Matthew Brooks, Alexander J Brucker, William H Cade, Melinda S Cain, Peter A Campochiaro, Chi-Chao Chan, Ching-Yu Cheng, Emily Y Chew, Kimberly A Chin, Itay Chowers, David G Clayton, Radu Cojocaru, Yvette P Conley, Belinda K Cornes, Mark J Daly, Baljean Dhillon, Albert O Edwards, Evangelos Evangelou, Jesen Fagerness, Henry A Ferreyra, James S Friedman, Asbjorg Geirsdottir, Ronnie J George, Christian Gieger, Neel Gupta, Stephanie A Hagstrom, Simon P Harding, Christos Haritoglou, John R Heckenlively, Frank G Holz, Guy Hughes, John P A Ioannidis, Tatsuro Ishibashi, Peronne Joseph, Gyungah Jun, Yoichiro Kamatani, Nicholas Katsanis, Claudia N Keilhauer, Jane C Khan, Ivana K Kim, Yutaka Kiyohara, Barbara E K Klein, Ronald Klein, Jaclyn L Kovach, Igor Kozak, Clara J Lee, Kristine E Lee, Peter Lichtner, Andrew J Lotery, Thomas Meitinger, Paul Mitchell, Saddek Mohand-Saïd, Anthony T Moore, Denise J Morgan, Margaux A Morrison, Chelsea E Myers, Adam C Naj, Yusuke Nakamura, Yukinori Okada, Anton Orlin, M Carolina Ortube, Mohammad I Othman, Chris Pappas, Kyu Hyung Park, Gayle J T Pauer, Neal S Peachey, Olivier Poch, Rinki Ratna Priya, Robyn Reynolds, Andrea J Richardson, Raymond Ripp, Guenther Rudolph, Euijung Ryu, José-Alain Sahel, Debra A Schaumberg, Hendrik P N Scholl, Stephen G Schwartz, William K Scott, Humma Shahid, Haraldur Sigurdsson, Giuliana Silvestri, Theru A Sivakumaran, R Theodore Smith, Lucia Sobrin, Eric H Souied, Dwight E Stambolian, Hreinn Stefansson, Gwen M Sturgill-Short, Atsushi Takahashi, Nirubol Tosakulwong, Barbara J Truitt, Evangelia E Tsironi, André G Uitterlinden, Cornelia M van Duijn, Lingam Vijaya, Johannes R Vingerling, Eranga N Vithana, Andrew R Webster, H-Erich Wichmann, Thomas W Winkler, Tien Y Wong, Alan F Wright, Diana Zelenika, Ming Zhang, Ling Zhao, Kang Zhang, Michael L Klein, Gregory S Hageman, G Mark Lathrop, Kari Stefansson, Rando Allikmets, Paul N Baird, Michael B Gorin, Jie Jin Wang, Caroline C W Klaver, Johanna M Seddon, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Sudha K Iyengar, John R W Yates, Anand Swaroop, Bernhard H F Weber, Michiaki Kubo, Margaret M DeAngelis, Thierry Léveillard, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Jonathan L Haines, Lindsay A Farrer, Iris M Heid, Gonçalo R Abecasis, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2013
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Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD.
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Quantitative Variation in Plasma Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme Activity Shows Allelic Heterogeneity in the ABO Blood Group Locus.
Ann. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) occupies a pivotal role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Major loci for plasma ACE have been identified at ACE on Chromosome 17 and at ABO on Chromosome 9. We sought to characterise the genetic architecture of plasma ACE at finer resolution in two populations. We carried out a GWAS in 1810 individuals of Japanese ethnicity; this identified signals at ACE and ABO that together accounted for nearly half of the population variability of the trait. We conducted measured haplotype analysis at the ABO locus in 1425 members of 248 British families using haplotypes of three SNPs, which together tagged the alleles responsible for the principal blood group antigens A1, A2, B and O. Type O alleles were associated with intermediate plasma ACE activity compared to Type A1 alleles (in whom plasma ACE activity was ?36% lower) and Type B alleles (in whom plasma ACE activity was ?36% higher). We demonstrated heterogeneity among A alleles: A2 alleles were associated with plasma ACE activity that was very similar to the O alleles. Variation at ACE accounted for 35% of the trait variance, and variation at ABO accounted for 15%. A further 10% could be ascribed to polygenic effects.
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Using genetic proxies for lifecourse sun exposure to assess the causal relationship of sun exposure with circulating vitamin d and prostate cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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Ecological and epidemiological studies have identified an inverse association of intensity and duration of sunlight exposure with prostate cancer, which may be explained by a reduction in vitamin D synthesis. Pigmentation traits influence sun exposure and therefore may affect prostate cancer risk. Because observational studies are vulnerable to confounding and measurement error, we used Mendelian randomization to examine the relationship of sun exposure with both prostate cancer risk and the intermediate phenotype, plasma levels of vitamin D.
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Genome-wide association analysis identifies a susceptibility locus for pulmonary arterial hypertension.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare, severe disease resulting from progressive obliteration of small-caliber pulmonary arteries by proliferating vascular cells. PAH can occur without recognized etiology (idiopathic PAH), be associated with a systemic disease or occur as a heritable form, with BMPR2 mutated in approximately 80% of familial and 15% of idiopathic PAH cases. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) based on 2 independent case-control studies for idiopathic and familial PAH (without BMPR2 mutations), including a total of 625 cases and 1,525 healthy individuals. We detected a significant association at the CBLN2 locus mapping to 18q22.3, with the risk allele conferring an odds ratio for PAH of 1.97 (1.59-2.45; P = 7.47 × 10(-10)). CBLN2 is expressed in the lung, and its expression is higher in explanted lungs from individuals with PAH and in endothelial cells cultured from explanted PAH lungs.
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Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10(-38)) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10(-67)). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10(-28)). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10(-94)). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development.
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Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs.
, S Hong Lee, Stephan Ripke, Benjamin M Neale, Stephen V Faraone, Shaun M Purcell, Roy H Perlis, Bryan J Mowry, Anita Thapar, Michael E Goddard, John S Witte, Devin Absher, Ingrid Agartz, Huda Akil, Farooq Amin, Ole A Andreassen, Adebayo Anjorin, Richard Anney, Verneri Anttila, Dan E Arking, Philip Asherson, Maria H Azevedo, Lena Backlund, Judith A Badner, Anthony J Bailey, Tobias Banaschewski, Jack D Barchas, Michael R Barnes, Thomas B Barrett, Nicholas Bass, Agatino Battaglia, Michael Bauer, Mònica Bayés, Frank Bellivier, Sarah E Bergen, Wade Berrettini, Catalina Betancur, Thomas Bettecken, Joseph Biederman, Elisabeth B Binder, Donald W Black, Douglas H R Blackwood, Cinnamon S Bloss, Michael Boehnke, Dorret I Boomsma, Gerome Breen, René Breuer, Richard Bruggeman, Paul Cormican, Nancy G Buccola, Jan K Buitelaar, William E Bunney, Joseph D Buxbaum, William F Byerley, Enda M Byrne, Sian Caesar, Wiepke Cahn, Rita M Cantor, Miguel Casas, Aravinda Chakravarti, Kimberly Chambert, Khalid Choudhury, Sven Cichon, C Robert Cloninger, David A Collier, Edwin H Cook, Hilary Coon, Bru Cormand, Aiden Corvin, William H Coryell, David W Craig, Ian W Craig, Jennifer Crosbie, Michael L Cuccaro, David Curtis, Darina Czamara, Susmita Datta, Geraldine Dawson, Richard Day, Eco J De Geus, Franziska Degenhardt, Srdjan Djurovic, Gary J Donohoe, Alysa E Doyle, Jubao Duan, Frank Dudbridge, Eftichia Duketis, Richard P Ebstein, Howard J Edenberg, Josephine Elia, Sean Ennis, Bruno Etain, Ayman Fanous, Anne E Farmer, I Nicol Ferrier, Matthew Flickinger, Eric Fombonne, Tatiana Foroud, Josef Frank, Barbara Franke, Christine Fraser, Robert Freedman, Nelson B Freimer, Christine M Freitag, Marion Friedl, Louise Frisén, Louise Gallagher, Pablo V Gejman, Lyudmila Georgieva, Elliot S Gershon, Daniel H Geschwind, Ina Giegling, Michael Gill, Scott D Gordon, Katherine Gordon-Smith, Elaine K Green, Tiffany A Greenwood, Dorothy E Grice, Magdalena Gross, Detelina Grozeva, Weihua Guan, Hugh Gurling, Lieuwe de Haan, Jonathan L Haines, Hakon Hakonarson, Joachim Hallmayer, Steven P Hamilton, Marian L Hamshere, Thomas F Hansen, Annette M Hartmann, Martin Hautzinger, Andrew C Heath, Anjali K Henders, Stefan Herms, Ian B Hickie, Maria Hipolito, Susanne Hoefels, Peter A Holmans, Florian Holsboer, Witte J Hoogendijk, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Christina M Hultman, Vanessa Hus, Andrés Ingason, Marcus Ising, Stéphane Jamain, Edward G Jones, Ian Jones, Lisa Jones, Jung-Ying Tzeng, Anna K Kähler, René S Kahn, Radhika Kandaswamy, Matthew C Keller, James L Kennedy, Elaine Kenny, Lindsey Kent, Yunjung Kim, George K Kirov, Sabine M Klauck, Lambertus Klei, James A Knowles, Martin A Kohli, Daniel L Koller, Bettina Konte, Ania Korszun, Lydia Krabbendam, Robert Krasucki, Jonna Kuntsi, Phoenix Kwan, Mikael Landén, Niklas Långström, Mark Lathrop, Jacob Lawrence, William B Lawson, Marion Leboyer, David H Ledbetter, Phil H Lee, Todd Lencz, Klaus-Peter Lesch, Douglas F Levinson, Cathryn M Lewis, Jun Li, Paul Lichtenstein, Jeffrey A Lieberman, Dan-Yu Lin, Don H Linszen, Chunyu Liu, Falk W Lohoff, Sandra K Loo, Catherine Lord, Jennifer K Lowe, Susanne Lucae, Donald J MacIntyre, Pamela A F Madden, Elena Maestrini, Patrik K E Magnusson, Pamela B Mahon, Wolfgang Maier, Anil K Malhotra, Shrikant M Mane, Christa L Martin, Nicholas G Martin, Manuel Mattheisen, Keith Matthews, Morten Mattingsdal, Steven A McCarroll, Kevin A McGhee, James J McGough, Patrick J McGrath, Peter McGuffin, Melvin G McInnis, Andrew McIntosh, Rebecca McKinney, Alan W McLean, Francis J McMahon, William M McMahon, Andrew McQuillin, Helena Medeiros, Sarah E Medland, Sandra Meier, Ingrid Melle, Fan Meng, Jobst Meyer, Christel M Middeldorp, Lefkos Middleton, Vihra Milanova, Ana Miranda, Anthony P Monaco, Grant W Montgomery, Jennifer L Moran, Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, Gunnar Morken, Derek W Morris, Eric M Morrow, Valentina Moskvina, Pierandrea Muglia, Thomas W Mühleisen, Walter J Muir, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Michael Murtha, Richard M Myers, Inez Myin-Germeys, Michael C Neale, Stan F Nelson, Caroline M Nievergelt, Ivan Nikolov, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, Willem A Nolen, Markus M Nöthen, John I Nurnberger, Evaristus A Nwulia, Dale R Nyholt, Colm O'Dushlaine, Robert D Oades, Ann Olincy, Guiomar Oliveira, Line Olsen, Roel A Ophoff, Urban Osby, Michael J Owen, Aarno Palotie, Jeremy R Parr, Andrew D Paterson, Carlos N Pato, Michele T Pato, Brenda W Penninx, Michele L Pergadia, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Benjamin S Pickard, Jonathan Pimm, Joseph Piven, Danielle Posthuma, James B Potash, Fritz Poustka, Peter Propping, Vinay Puri, Digby J Quested, Emma M Quinn, Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, Henrik B Rasmussen, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Karola Rehnström, Andreas Reif, Marta Ribasés, John P Rice, Marcella Rietschel, Kathryn Roeder, Herbert Roeyers, Lizzy Rossin, Aribert Rothenberger, Guy Rouleau, Douglas Ruderfer, Dan Rujescu, Alan R Sanders, Stephan J Sanders, Susan L Santangelo, Joseph A Sergeant, Russell Schachar, Martin Schalling, Alan F Schatzberg, William A Scheftner, Gerard D Schellenberg, Stephen W Scherer, Nicholas J Schork, Thomas G Schulze, Johannes Schumacher, Markus Schwarz, Edward Scolnick, Laura J Scott, Jianxin Shi, Paul D Shilling, Stanley I Shyn, Jeremy M Silverman, Susan L Slager, Susan L Smalley, Johannes H Smit, Erin N Smith, Edmund J S Sonuga-Barke, David St Clair, Matthew State, Michael Steffens, Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, John S Strauss, Jana Strohmaier, T Scott Stroup, James S Sutcliffe, Peter Szatmari, Szabocls Szelinger, Srinivasa Thirumalai, Robert C Thompson, Alexandre A Todorov, Federica Tozzi, Jens Treutlein, Manfred Uhr, Edwin J C G van den Oord, Gerard van Grootheest, Jim van Os, Astrid M Vicente, Veronica J Vieland, John B Vincent, Peter M Visscher, Christopher A Walsh, Thomas H Wassink, Stanley J Watson, Myrna M Weissman, Thomas Werge, Thomas F Wienker, Ellen M Wijsman, Gonneke Willemsen, Nigel Williams, A Jeremy Willsey, Stephanie H Witt, Wei Xu, Allan H Young, Timothy W Yu, Stanley Zammit, Peter P Zandi, Peng Zhang, Frans G Zitman, Sebastian Zöllner, Bernie Devlin, John R Kelsoe, Pamela Sklar, Mark J Daly, Michael C O'Donovan, Nicholas Craddock, Patrick F Sullivan, Jordan W Smoller, Kenneth S Kendler, Naomi R Wray.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2013
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Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17-29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohns disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders.
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Genome-wide linkage analysis for human longevity: Genetics of Healthy Aging Study.
Aging Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Clear evidence exists for heritability of human longevity, and much interest is focused on identifying genes associated with longer lives. To identify such longevity alleles, we performed the largest genome-wide linkage scan thus far reported. Linkage analyses included 2118 nonagenarian Caucasian sibling pairs that have been enrolled in 15 study centers of 11 European countries as part of the Genetics of Healthy Aging (GEHA) project. In the joint linkage analyses, we observed four regions that show linkage with longevity; chromosome 14q11.2 (LOD = 3.47), chromosome 17q12-q22 (LOD = 2.95), chromosome 19p13.3-p13.11 (LOD = 3.76), and chromosome 19q13.11-q13.32 (LOD = 3.57). To fine map these regions linked to longevity, we performed association analysis using GWAS data in a subgroup of 1228 unrelated nonagenarian and 1907 geographically matched controls. Using a fixed-effect meta-analysis approach, rs4420638 at the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 gene locus showed significant association with longevity (P-value = 9.6 × 10(-8) ). By combined modeling of linkage and association, we showed that association of longevity with APOE?4 and APOE?2 alleles explain the linkage at 19q13.11-q13.32 with P-value = 0.02 and P-value = 1.0 × 10(-5) , respectively. In the largest linkage scan thus far performed for human familial longevity, we confirm that the APOE locus is a longevity gene and that additional longevity loci may be identified at 14q11.2, 17q12-q22, and 19p13.3-p13.11. As the latter linkage results are not explained by common variants, we suggest that rare variants play an important role in human familial longevity.
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A variant in FTO shows association with melanoma risk not due to BMI.
Mark M Iles, Matthew H Law, Simon N Stacey, Jiali Han, Shenying Fang, Ruth Pfeiffer, Mark Harland, Stuart MacGregor, John C Taylor, Katja K Aben, Lars A Akslen, Marie-Françoise Avril, Esther Azizi, Bert Bakker, Kristrun R Benediktsdottir, Wilma Bergman, Giovanna Bianchi Scarrà, Kevin M Brown, Donato Calista, Valérie Chaudru, Maria Concetta Fargnoli, Anne E Cust, Florence Demenais, Anne C de Waal, Tadeusz Dębniak, David E Elder, Eitan Friedman, Pilar Galán, Paola Ghiorzo, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Alisa M Goldstein, Nelleke A Gruis, Johan Hansson, Per Helsing, Marko Hočevar, Veronica Höiom, John L Hopper, Christian Ingvar, Marjolein Janssen, Mark A Jenkins, Peter A Kanetsky, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Julie Lang, G Mark Lathrop, Sancy Leachman, Jeffrey E Lee, Jan Lubiński, Rona M Mackie, Graham J Mann, Nicholas G Martin, Jose I Mayordomo, Anders Molven, Suzanne Mulder, Eduardo Nagore, Srdjan Novaković, Ichiro Okamoto, Jon H Olafsson, Hakan Olsson, Hubert Pehamberger, Ketty Peris, Maria Pilar Grasa, Dolores Planelles, Susana Puig, Joan Anton Puig-Butille, Juliette Randerson-Moor, Celia Requena, Licia Rivoltini, Monica Rodolfo, Mario Santinami, Bardur Sigurgeirsson, Helen Snowden, Fengju Song, Patrick Sulem, Kristin Thorisdottir, Rainer Tuominen, Patricia Van Belle, Nienke van der Stoep, Michelle M van Rossum, Qingyi Wei, Judith Wendt, Diana Zelenika, Mingfeng Zhang, Maria Teresa Landi, Gudmar Thorleifsson, D Timothy Bishop, Christopher I Amos, Nicholas K Hayward, Kari Stefansson, Julia A Newton Bishop, Jennifer H Barrett, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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We report the results of an association study of melanoma that is based on the genome-wide imputation of the genotypes of 1,353 cases and 3,566 controls of European origin conducted by the GenoMEL consortium. This revealed an association between several SNPs in intron 8 of the FTO gene, including rs16953002, which replicated using 12,313 cases and 55,667 controls of European ancestry from Europe, the USA and Australia (combined P = 3.6 × 10(-12), per-allele odds ratio for allele A = 1.16). In addition to identifying a new melanoma-susceptibility locus, this is to our knowledge the first study to identify and replicate an association with SNPs in FTO not related to body mass index (BMI). These SNPs are not in intron 1 (the BMI-related region) and exhibit no association with BMI. This suggests FTOs function may be broader than the existing paradigm that FTO variants influence multiple traits only through their associations with BMI and obesity.
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A cross-platform analysis of 14,177 expression quantitative trait loci derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Gene expression levels can be an important link DNA between variation and phenotypic manifestations. Our previous map of global gene expression, based on ~400K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 50K transcripts in 400 sib pairs from the MRCA family panel, has been widely used to interpret the results of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). Here, we more than double the size of our initial data set with expression data on 550 additional individuals from the MRCE family panel using the Illumina whole-genome expression array. We have used new statistical methods for dimension reduction to account for nongenetic effects in estimates of expression levels, and we have also included SNPs imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project. Our methods reduced false-discovery rates and increased the number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapped either locally or at a distance (i.e., in cis or trans) from 1534 in the MRCA data set to 4452 (with <5% FDR). Imputation of 1000 Genomes SNPs further increased the number of eQTLs to 7302. Using the same methods and imputed SNPs in the newly acquired MRCE data set, we identified eQTLs for 9000 genes. The combined results identify strong local and distant effects for transcripts from 14,177 genes. Our eQTL database based on these results is freely available to help define the function of disease-associated variants.
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AP1S2 is mutated in X-linked Dandy-Walker malformation with intellectual disability, basal ganglia disease and seizures (Pettigrew syndrome).
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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MRXS5 or Pettigrew syndrome was described 20 years ago in a four generation family including nine affected individuals presenting with facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, Dandy-Walker malformation and inconstant choreoathetosis. Four individuals had iron deposition in the basal ganglia seen on MRI or at autopsy. The mutation causing Pettigrew has remained elusive since the initial description of the condition. We report the identification of a mutation in the X-linked AP1S2 gene in the original Pettigrew syndrome family using X-chromosome exome sequencing. We report additional phenotype details for several of the affected individuals, allowing us to further refine the phenotype corresponding to this X-linked intellectual disability syndrome. The AP1S2 c.426+1?G>T mutation segregates with the disease in the Pettigrew syndrome family and results in loss of 46 amino acids in the clathrin adaptor complex small chain domain that spans most of the AP1S2 protein sequence. The mutation reported here in AP1S2 is the first mutation that is not predicted to cause a premature termination of the coding sequence or absence of the AP1S2 protein. Although most of the families affected by a mutation in AP1S2 were initially described as having different disorders assigned to at least three different OMIM numbers (MIM 300629, 300630 and 304340), our analysis of the phenotype shows that they are all the same syndrome with recognition complicated by highly variable expressivity that is seen within as well as between families and is probably not explained by differences in mutation severity.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 12 June 2013; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.135.
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Genome-wide association study identifies loci on 12q24 and 13q32 associated with tetralogy of Fallot.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2013
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We conducted a genome-wide association study to search for risk alleles associated with Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), using a northern European discovery set of 835 cases and 5159 controls. A region on chromosome 12q24 was associated (P = 1.4 × 10(-7)) and replicated convincingly (P = 3.9 × 10(-5)) in 798 cases and 2931 controls [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.27 in replication cohort, P = 7.7 × 10(-11) in combined populations]. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the glypican 5 gene on chromosome 13q32 were also associated (P = 1.7 × 10(-7)) and replicated convincingly (P = 1.2 × 10(-5)) in 789 cases and 2927 controls (per allele OR = 1.31 in replication cohort, P = 3.03 × 10(-11) in combined populations). Four additional regions on chromosomes 10, 15 and 16 showed suggestive association accompanied by nominal replication. This study, the first genome-wide association study of a congenital heart malformation phenotype, provides evidence that common genetic variation influences the risk of TOF.
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A phenotypic structure and neural correlates of compulsive behaviors in adolescents.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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A compulsivity spectrum has been hypothesized to exist across Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD), Eating Disorders (ED), substance abuse (SA) and binge-drinking (BD). The objective was to examine the validity of this compulsivity spectrum, and differentiate it from an externalizing behaviors dimension, but also to look at hypothesized personality and neural correlates.
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Phenotype-specific effect of chromosome 1q21.1 rearrangements and GJA5 duplications in 2436 congenital heart disease patients and 6760 controls.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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Recurrent rearrangements of chromosome 1q21.1 that occur via non-allelic homologous recombination have been associated with variable phenotypes exhibiting incomplete penetrance, including congenital heart disease (CHD). However, the gene or genes within the ~1 Mb critical region responsible for each of the associated phenotypes remains unknown. We examined the 1q21.1 locus in 948 patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), 1488 patients with other forms of CHD and 6760 ethnically matched controls using single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping arrays (Illumina 660W and Affymetrix 6.0) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We found that duplication of 1q21.1 was more common in cases of TOF than in controls [odds ratio (OR) 30.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.9-107.6); P = 2.2 × 10(-7)], but deletion was not. In contrast, deletion of 1q21.1 was more common in cases of non-TOF CHD than in controls [OR 5.5 (95% CI 1.4-22.0); P = 0.04] while duplication was not. We also detected rare (n = 3) 100-200 kb duplications within the critical region of 1q21.1 in cases of TOF. These small duplications encompassed a single gene in common, GJA5, and were enriched in cases of TOF in comparison to controls [OR = 10.7 (95% CI 1.8-64.3), P = 0.01]. These findings show that duplication and deletion at chromosome 1q21.1 exhibit a degree of phenotypic specificity in CHD, and implicate GJA5 as the gene responsible for the CHD phenotypes observed with copy number imbalances at this locus.
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Determinants of early alcohol use in healthy adolescents: the differential contribution of neuroimaging and psychological factors.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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Individual variation in reward sensitivity may have an important role in early substance use and subsequent development of substance abuse. This may be especially important during adolescence, a transition period marked by approach behavior and a propensity toward risk taking, novelty seeking and alteration of the social landscape. However, little is known about the relative contribution of personality, behavior, and brain responses for prediction of alcohol use in adolescents. In this study, we applied factor analyses and structural equation modeling to reward-related brain responses assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging during a monetary incentive delay task. In addition, novelty seeking, sensation seeking, impulsivity, extraversion, and behavioral measures of risk taking were entered as predictors of early onset of drinking in a sample of 14-year-old healthy adolescents (N=324). Reward-associated behavior, personality, and brain responses all contributed to alcohol intake with personality explaining a higher proportion of the variance than behavior and brain responses. When only the ventral striatum was used, a small non-significant contribution to the prediction of early alcohol use was found. These data suggest that the role of reward-related brain activation may be more important in addiction than initiation of early drinking, where personality traits and reward-related behaviors were more significant. With up to 26% of explained variance, the interrelation of reward-related personality traits, behavior, and neural response patterns may convey risk for later alcohol abuse in adolescence, and thus may be identified as a vulnerability factor for the development of substance use disorders.
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A genome-wide association study identifies a novel susceptibility locus for renal cell carcinoma on 12p11.23.
Xifeng Wu, Ghislaine Scelo, Mark P Purdue, Nathaniel Rothman, Mattias Johansson, Yuanqing Ye, Zhaoming Wang, Diana Zelenika, Lee E Moore, Christopher G Wood, Egor Prokhortchouk, Valerie Gaborieau, Kevin B Jacobs, Wong-Ho Chow, Jorge R Toro, David Zaridze, Jie Lin, Jan Lubiński, Joanna Trubicka, Neonilia Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonóra Fabiánová, Dana Mates, Viorel Jinga, Vladimír Bencko, Alena Slamova, Ivana Holcatova, Marie Navratilova, Vladimir Janout, Paolo Boffetta, Joanne S Colt, Faith G Davis, Kendra L Schwartz, Rosamonde E Banks, Peter J Selby, Patricia Harnden, Christine D Berg, Ann W Hsing, Robert L Grubb, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Vineis, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Domenico Palli, Rosario Tumino, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Eric J Duell, José Ramón Quirós, Maria-Jose Sanchez, Carmen Navarro, Eva Ardanaz, Miren Dorronsoro, Kay-Tee Khaw, Naomi E Allen, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Petra H M Peeters, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Jakob Linseisen, Börje Ljungberg, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Isabelle Romieu, Elio Riboli, Victoria L Stevens, Michael J Thun, W Ryan Diver, Susan M Gapstur, Paul D Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Demetrius Albanes, Jarmo Virtamo, Lars Vatten, Kristian Hveem, Tony Fletcher, Kvetoslava Koppova, Olivier Cussenot, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Simone Benhamou, Michelle A Hildebrandt, Xia Pu, Mario Foglio, Doris Lechner, Amy Hutchinson, Meredith Yeager, Joseph F Fraumeni, Mark Lathrop, Konstantin G Skryabin, James D McKay, Jian Gu, Paul Brennan, Stephen J Chanock.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal urologic cancer. Only two common susceptibility loci for RCC have been confirmed to date. To identify additional RCC common susceptibility loci, we conducted an independent genome-wide association study (GWAS). We analyzed 533 191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association with RCC in 894 cases and 1516 controls of European descent recruited from MD Anderson Cancer Center in the primary scan, and validated the top 500 SNPs in silico in 3772 cases and 8505 controls of European descent involved in the only published GWAS of RCC. We identified two common variants in linkage disequilibrium, rs718314 and rs1049380 (r(2) = 0.64, D? = 0.84), in the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor, type 2 (ITPR2) gene on 12p11.23 as novel susceptibility loci for RCC (P = 8.89 × 10(-10) and P = 6.07 × 10(-9), respectively, in meta-analysis) with an allelic odds ratio of 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.26] for rs718314 and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12-1.25) for rs1049380. It has been recently identified that rs718314 in ITPR2 is associated with waist-hip ratio (WHR) phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic locus associated with both cancer risk and WHR.
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Risk taking and the adolescent reward system: a potential common link to substance abuse.
Am J Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
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Increased risk-taking behavior has been associated with addiction, a disorder also linked to abnormalities in reward processing. Specifically, an attenuated response of reward-related areas (e.g., the ventral striatum) to nondrug reward cues has been reported in addiction. One unanswered question is whether risk-taking preference is associated with striatal reward processing in the absence of substance abuse.
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Genomic binding of Pol III transcription machinery and relationship with TFIIS transcription factor distribution in mouse embryonic stem cells.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2011
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RNA polymerase (Pol) III synthesizes the tRNAs, the 5S ribosomal RNA and a small number of untranslated RNAs. In vitro, it also transcribes short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs). We investigated the distribution of Pol III and its associated transcription factors on the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells using a highly specific tandem ChIP-Seq method. Only a subset of the annotated class III genes was bound and thus transcribed. A few hundred SINEs were associated with the Pol III transcription machinery. We observed that Pol III and its transcription factors were present at 30 unannotated sites on the mouse genome, only one of which was conserved in human. An RNA was associated with >80% of these regions. More than 2200 regions bound by TFIIIC transcription factor were devoid of Pol III. These sites were associated with cohesins and often located close to CTCF-binding sites, suggesting that TFIIIC might cooperate with these factors to organize the chromatin. We also investigated the genome-wide distribution of the ubiquitous TFIIS variant, TCEA1. We found that, as in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TFIIS is associated with class III genes and also with SINEs suggesting that TFIIS is a Pol III transcription factor in mammals.
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Genome-wide association study of HPV seropositivity.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2011
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High-risk ? mucosal types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers, whereas ? cutaneous HPV types (e.g. HPV8) have been implicated in non-melanoma skin cancer. Although antibodies against the capsid protein L1 of HPV are considered as markers of cumulative exposure, not all infected persons seroconvert. To identify common genetic variants that influence HPV seroconversion, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association study. Genome-wide genotyping of 316 015 single nucleotide polymorphisms was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 BeadChip in 4811 subjects from a central European case-control study of lung, head and neck and kidney cancer that had serology data available on 13 HPV types. Only one association met genome-wide significance criteria, namely that between HPV8 seropositivity and rs9357152 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24-1.50 for the minor allele G; P=1.2 × 10(-10)], a common genetic variant (minor allele frequency=0.33) located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II region at 6p21.32. This association was subsequently replicated in an independent set of 2344 subjects from a Latin American case-control study of head and neck cancer (OR=1.35, 95% CI=1.18-1.56, P=2.2 × 10(-5)), yielding P=1.3 × 10(-14) in the combined analysis (P-heterogeneity=0.87). No heterogeneity was noted by cancer status (controls/lung cancer cases/head and neck cancer cases/kidney cancer cases). This study provides a proof of principle that genetic variation plays a role in antibody reactivity to HPV infection.
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Effects of the circadian rhythm gene period 1 (per1) on psychosocial stress-induced alcohol drinking.
Am J Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2011
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Circadian and stress-response systems mediate environmental changes that affect alcohol drinking. Psychosocial stress is an environmental risk factor for alcohol abuse. Circadian rhythm gene period 1 (Per1) is targeted by stress hormones and is transcriptionally activated in corticotropin releasing factor-expressing cells. The authors hypothesized that Per1 is involved in integrating stress response and circadian rhythmicity and explored its relevance to alcohol drinking.
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A genome-wide association study of the Protein C anticoagulant pathway.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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The Protein C anticoagulant pathway regulates blood coagulation by preventing the inadequate formation of thrombi. It has two main plasma components: protein C and protein S. Individuals with protein C or protein S deficiency present a dramatically increased incidence of thromboembolic disorders. Here, we present the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for protein C and protein S plasma levels in a set of extended pedigrees from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia (GAIT) Project. A total number of 397 individuals from 21 families were typed for 307,984 SNPs using the Infinium® 317 k Beadchip (Illumina). Protein C and protein S (free, functional and total) plasma levels were determined with biochemical assays for all participants. Association with phenotypes was investigated through variance component analysis. After correcting for multiple testing, two SNPs for protein C plasma levels (rs867186 and rs8119351) and another two for free protein S plasma levels (rs1413885 and rs1570868) remained significant on a genome-wide level, located in and around the PROCR and the DNAJC6 genomic regions respectively. No SNPs were significantly associated with functional or total protein S plasma levels, although rs1413885 from DNAJC6 showed suggestive association with the functional protein S phenotype, possibly indicating that this locus plays an important role in protein S metabolism. Our results provide evidence that PROCR and DNAJC6 might play a role in protein C and free protein S plasma levels in the population studied, warranting further investigation on the role of these loci in the etiology of venous thromboembolism and other thrombotic diseases.
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Integrating pathway analysis and genetics of gene expression for genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have primarily focused on marginal effects for individual markers and have incorporated external functional information only after identifying robust statistical associations. We applied a new approach combining the genetics of gene expression and functional classification of genes to the GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to identify potential biological pathways associated with BCC. We first identified 322,324 expression-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs) from two existing GWASs of global gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 955), and evaluated the association of these functionally annotated SNPs with BCC among 2,045 BCC cases and 6,013 controls in Caucasians. We then grouped them into 99 KEGG pathways for pathway analysis and identified two pathways associated with BCC with p value <0.05 and false discovery rate (FDR) <0.5: the autoimmune thyroid disease pathway (mainly HLA class I and II antigens, p < 0.001, FDR = 0.24) and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway (p = 0.02, FDR = 0.49). Seventy-nine (25.7%) out of 307 significant eSNPs in the JAK-STAT pathway were associated with BCC risk (p < 0.05) in an independent replication set of 278 BCC cases and 1,262 controls. In addition, the association of JAK-STAT signaling pathway was marginally validated using 16,691 eSNPs identified from 110 normal skin samples (p = 0.08). Based on the evidence of biological functions of the JAK-STAT pathway on oncogenesis, it is plausible that this pathway is involved in BCC pathogenesis.
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Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.
, Georg B Ehret, Patricia B Munroe, Kenneth M Rice, Murielle Bochud, Andrew D Johnson, Daniel I Chasman, Albert V Smith, Martin D Tobin, Germaine C Verwoert, Shih-Jen Hwang, Vasyl Pihur, Peter Vollenweider, Paul F O'Reilly, Najaf Amin, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Alexander Teumer, Nicole L Glazer, Lenore Launer, Jing Hua Zhao, Yurii Aulchenko, Simon Heath, Siim Sõber, Afshin Parsa, Jian'an Luan, Pankaj Arora, Abbas Dehghan, Feng Zhang, Gavin Lucas, Andrew A Hicks, Anne U Jackson, John F Peden, Toshiko Tanaka, Sarah H Wild, Igor Rudan, Wilmar Igl, Yuri Milaneschi, Alex N Parker, Cristiano Fava, John C Chambers, Ervin R Fox, Meena Kumari, Min Jin Go, Pim van der Harst, Wen Hong Linda Kao, Marketa Sjögren, D G Vinay, Myriam Alexander, Yasuharu Tabara, Sue Shaw-Hawkins, Peter H Whincup, Yongmei Liu, Gang Shi, Johanna Kuusisto, Bamidele Tayo, Mark Seielstad, Xueling Sim, Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, Terho Lehtimäki, Giuseppe Matullo, Ying Wu, Tom R Gaunt, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Matthew N Cooper, Carl G P Platou, Elin Org, Rebecca Hardy, Santosh Dahgam, Jutta Palmen, Veronique Vitart, Peter S Braund, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Cuno S P M Uiterwaal, Adebowale Adeyemo, Walter Palmas, Harry Campbell, Barbara Ludwig, Maciej Tomaszewski, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Nicholette D Palmer, Thor Aspelund, Melissa Garcia, Yen-Pei C Chang, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Nanette I Steinle, Diederick E Grobbee, Dan E Arking, Sharon L Kardia, Alanna C Morrison, Dena Hernandez, Samer Najjar, Wendy L McArdle, David Hadley, Morris J Brown, John M Connell, Aroon D Hingorani, Ian N M Day, Debbie A Lawlor, John P Beilby, Robert W Lawrence, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, Halit Ongen, Albert W Dreisbach, Yali Li, J Hunter Young, Joshua C Bis, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Linda S Adair, Nanette R Lee, Ming-Huei Chen, Matthias Olden, Cristian Pattaro, Judith A Hoffman Bolton, Anna Köttgen, Sven Bergmann, Vincent Mooser, Nish Chaturvedi, Timothy M Frayling, Muhammad Islam, Tazeen H Jafar, Jeanette Erdmann, Smita R Kulkarni, Stefan R Bornstein, Jürgen Gräßler, Leif Groop, Benjamin F Voight, Johannes Kettunen, Philip Howard, Andrew Taylor, Simonetta Guarrera, Fulvio Ricceri, Valur Emilsson, Andrew Plump, Inês Barroso, Kay-Tee Khaw, Alan B Weder, Steven C Hunt, Yan V Sun, Richard N Bergman, Francis S Collins, Lori L Bonnycastle, Laura J Scott, Heather M Stringham, Leena Peltonen, Markus Perola, Erkki Vartiainen, Stefan-Martin Brand, Jan A Staessen, Thomas J Wang, Paul R Burton, María Soler Artigas, Yanbin Dong, Harold Snieder, Xiaoling Wang, Haidong Zhu, Kurt K Lohman, Megan E Rudock, Susan R Heckbert, Nicholas L Smith, Kerri L Wiggins, Ayo Doumatey, Daniel Shriner, Gudrun Veldre, Margus Viigimaa, Sanjay Kinra, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Vikal Tripathy, Carl D Langefeld, Annika Rosengren, Dag S Thelle, Anna Maria Corsi, Andrew Singleton, Terrence Forrester, Gina Hilton, Colin A McKenzie, Tunde Salako, Naoharu Iwai, Yoshikuni Kita, Toshio Ogihara, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Satoshi Umemura, Susana Eyheramendy, Thomas Meitinger, H-Erich Wichmann, Yoon Shin Cho, Hyung-Lae Kim, Jong-Young Lee, James Scott, Joban S Sehmi, Weihua Zhang, Bo Hedblad, Peter Nilsson, George Davey Smith, Andrew Wong, Narisu Narisu, Alena Stančáková, Leslie J Raffel, Jie Yao, Sekar Kathiresan, Christopher J O'Donnell, Stephen M Schwartz, M Arfan Ikram, W T Longstreth, Thomas H Mosley, Sudha Seshadri, Nick R G Shrine, Louise V Wain, Mario A Morken, Amy J Swift, Jaana Laitinen, Inga Prokopenko, Paavo Zitting, Jackie A Cooper, Steve E Humphries, John Danesh, Asif Rasheed, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Hugh Watkins, Stephan J L Bakker, Wiek H van Gilst, Charles S Janipalli, K Radha Mani, Chittaranjan S Yajnik, Albert Hofman, Francesco U S Mattace-Raso, Ben A Oostra, Ayse Demirkan, Aaron Isaacs, Fernando Rivadeneira, Edward G Lakatta, Marco Orrù, Angelo Scuteri, Mika Ala-Korpela, Antti J Kangas, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Pasi Soininen, Taru Tukiainen, Peter Würtz, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Marcus Dörr, Heyo K Kroemer, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Pilar Galán, Serge Hercberg, Mark Lathrop, Diana Zelenika, Panos Deloukas, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Guangju Zhai, James F Meschia, Michael A Nalls, Pankaj Sharma, Janos Terzic, M V Kranthi Kumar, Matthew Denniff, Ewa Zukowska-Szczechowska, Lynne E Wagenknecht, F Gerald R Fowkes, Fadi J Charchar, Peter E H Schwarz, Caroline Hayward, Xiuqing Guo, Charles Rotimi, Michiel L Bots, Eva Brand, Nilesh J Samani, Ozren Polašek, Philippa J Talmud, Fredrik Nyberg, Diana Kuh, Maris Laan, Kristian Hveem, Lyle J Palmer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Juan P Casas, Karen L Mohlke, Paolo Vineis, Olli Raitakari, Santhi K Ganesh, Tien Y Wong, E Shyong Tai, Richard S Cooper, Markku Laakso, Dabeeru C Rao, Tamara B Harris, Richard W Morris, Anna F Dominiczak, Mika Kivimäki, Michael G Marmot, Tetsuro Miki, Danish Saleheen, Giriraj R Chandak, Josef Coresh, Gerjan Navis, Veikko Salomaa, Bok-Ghee Han, Xiaofeng Zhu, Jaspal S Kooner, Olle Melander, Paul M Ridker, Stefania Bandinelli, Ulf B Gyllensten, Alan F Wright, James F Wilson, Luigi Ferrucci, Martin Farrall, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Peter P Pramstaller, Roberto Elosua, Nicole Soranzo, Eric J G Sijbrands, David Altshuler, Ruth J F Loos, Alan R Shuldiner, Christian Gieger, Pierre Meneton, André G Uitterlinden, Nicholas J Wareham, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jerome I Rotter, Rainer Rettig, Manuela Uda, David P Strachan, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Jacques S Beckmann, Eric Boerwinkle, Ramachandran S Vasan, Michael Boehnke, Martin G Larson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Bruce M Psaty, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Aravinda Chakravarti, Paul Elliott, Cornelia M van Duijn, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Daniel Levy, Mark J Caulfield, Toby Johnson.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (?140?mm?Hg systolic blood pressure or? ?90?mm?Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.
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A polymorphism of the POLG2 gene is genetically associated with the invasiveness of urinary bladder cancer in Japanese males.
J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2011
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Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is a common cancer with male predominance. Pathologically it is classified into two distinct tumor entities related to the risk of patients. The low-grade tumors with relatively well-differentiated tumor histology (G1 and G2) at stage Ta are non-invasive and pose a minimal risk, whereas high-grade tumors (G2 and G3) with stages T1 to T4 are aggressive with invasion, and therefore, pose a serious risk for the patients. DNA repair and metabolic process genes may have major roles in cancer progression and development. To identify genes associated with invasiveness of UBC, we have extensively genotyped 802 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 114 genes related to DNA repair mechanisms and metabolic processes. A genetic association study was performed between non-invasive (G1 and G2 with Ta) and invasive (G2 and G3 with T1 to T4) groups of Japanese UBC patients. We found that rs17650301 in POLG2 showed marked difference in genotype distribution between the two groups in males (P=6.93 × 10(-4)), which was further confirmed in an independent sample set (overall P=1.67 × 10(-4)). We also found by an in silico analysis that the risk allele of rs17650301 increased the transcription of POLG2. In conclusion, rs17650301 is a good candidate marker for UBC invasiveness in Japanese males.
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Coordinated conditional simulation with SLINK and SUP of many markers linked or associated to a trait in large pedigrees.
Hum. Hered.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2011
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Simulation of genotypes in pedigrees is an important tool to evaluate the power of a linkage or an association study and to assess the empirical significance of results. SLINK is a widely-used package for pedigree simulations, but its implementation has not previously been described in a published paper. SLINK was initially derived from the LINKAGE programs. Over the 20 years since its release, SLINK has been modified to incorporate faster algorithms, notably from the linkage analysis package FASTLINK, also derived from LINKAGE. While SLINK can simulate genotypes on pedigrees of high complexity, one limitation of SLINK, as with most methods based on peeling algorithms to evaluate pedigree likelihoods, is the small number of linked markers that can be generated. The software package SUP includes an elegant wrapper for SLINK that circumvents the limitation on number of markers by using descent markers generated by SLINK to simulate a much larger number of markers on the same chromosome, linked and possibly associated with a trait locus. We have released new coordinated versions of SLINK (3.0; available from http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu) and SUP (v090804; available from http://mlemire.freeshell.org/software or http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu) that integrate the two software packages. Thereby, we have removed some of the previous limitations on the joint functionality of the programs, such as the number of founders in a pedigree. We review the history of SLINK and describe how SLINK and SUP are now coordinated to permit the simulation of large numbers of markers linked and possibly associated with a trait in large pedigrees.
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Manual dexterity correlating with right lobule VI volume in right-handed 14-year-olds.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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Dexterity is a fundamental skill in our everyday life. Particularly, the fine-tuning of reaching for objects is of high relevance and crucially coordinated by the cerebellum. Although neuronal cerebellar structures mediate dexterity, classical whole brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has not identified structural correlates of dexterity in the cerebellum.
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Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.
Toby Johnson, Tom R Gaunt, Stephen J Newhouse, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Maciej Tomaszewski, Meena Kumari, Richard W Morris, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Eoin T O'Brien, Neil R Poulter, Peter Sever, Denis C Shields, Simon Thom, Sasiwarang G Wannamethee, Peter H Whincup, Morris J Brown, John M Connell, Richard J Dobson, Philip J Howard, Charles A Mein, Abiodun Onipinla, Sue Shaw-Hawkins, Yun Zhang, George Davey Smith, Ian N M Day, Debbie A Lawlor, Alison H Goodall, , F Gerald Fowkes, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Paul Elliott, Vesela Gateva, Peter S Braund, Paul R Burton, Christopher P Nelson, Martin D Tobin, Pim van der Harst, Nicola Glorioso, Hani Neuvrith, Erika Salvi, Jan A Staessen, Andrea Stucchi, Nabila Devos, Xavier Jeunemaitre, Pierre-Francois Plouin, Jean Tichet, Peeter Juhanson, Elin Org, Margus Putku, Siim Sõber, Gudrun Veldre, Margus Viigimaa, Anna Levinsson, Annika Rosengren, Dag S Thelle, Claire E Hastie, Thomas Hedner, Wai K Lee, Olle Melander, Björn Wahlstrand, Rebecca Hardy, Andrew Wong, Jackie A Cooper, Jutta Palmen, Li Chen, Alexandre F R Stewart, George A Wells, Harm-Jan Westra, Marcel G M Wolfs, Robert Clarke, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Mark Lathrop, John F Peden, Udo Seedorf, Hugh Watkins, Willem H Ouwehand, Jennifer Sambrook, Jonathan Stephens, Juan-Pablo Casas, Fotios Drenos, Michael V Holmes, Mika Kivimäki, Sonia Shah, Tina Shah, Philippa J Talmud, John Whittaker, Chris Wallace, Christian Delles, Maris Laan, Diana Kuh, Steve E Humphries, Fredrik Nyberg, Daniele Cusi, Robert Roberts, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Lude Franke, Alice V Stanton, Anna F Dominiczak, Martin Farrall, Aroon D Hingorani, Nilesh J Samani, Mark J Caulfield, Patricia B Munroe.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies.
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A genome-wide association study confirms APOE as the major gene influencing survival in long-lived individuals.
Mech. Ageing Dev.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
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We conducted a case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of human longevity, comparing 664,472 autosomal SNPs in 763 long-lived individuals (LLI; mean age: 99.7 years) and 1085 controls (mean age: 60.2 years) from Germany. Only one association, namely that of SNP rs4420638 near the APOC1 gene, achieved genome-wide significance (allele-based P=1.8×10(-10)). However, logistic regression analysis revealed that this association, which was replicated in an independent German sample, is fully explicable by linkage disequilibrium with the APOE allele ?4, the only variant hitherto established as a major genetic determinant of survival into old age. Our GWAS failed to identify any additional autosomal susceptibility genes. One explanation for this lack of success in our study would be that GWAS provide only limited statistical power for a polygenic phenotype with loci of small effect such as human longevity. A recent GWAS in Dutch LLI independently confirmed the APOE-longevity association, thus strengthening the conclusion that this locus is a very, if not the most, important genetic factor influencing longevity.
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Genetics of venous thrombosis: insights from a new genome wide association study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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Venous Thrombosis (VT) is a common multifactorial disease associated with a major public health burden. Genetics factors are known to contribute to the susceptibility of the disease but how many genes are involved and their contribution to VT risk still remain obscure. We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with VT risk.
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Family-based designs for genome-wide association studies.
Nat. Rev. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Association mapping has successfully identified common SNPs associated with many diseases. However, the inability of this class of variation to account for most of the supposed heritability has led to a renewed interest in methods - primarily linkage analysis - to detect rare variants. Family designs allow for control of population stratification, investigations of questions such as parent-of-origin effects and other applications that are imperfectly or not readily addressed in case-control association studies. This article guides readers through the interface between linkage and association analysis, reviews the new methodologies and provides useful guidelines for applications. Just as effective SNP-genotyping tools helped to realize the potential of association studies, next-generation sequencing tools will benefit genetic studies by improving the power of family-based approaches.
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Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis.
Orphanet J Rare Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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Usher syndrome (USH) combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3). Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool.
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Combined analysis of three genome-wide association studies on vWF and FVIII plasma levels.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2011
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Elevated levels of factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) are well-established risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, in particular venous thrombosis. Although high, the heritability of these traits is poorly explained by the genetic factors known so far. The aim of this work was to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could influence the variability of these traits.
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Chromosome 7p11.2 (EGFR) variation influences glioma risk.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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While gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors, their etiology is largely unknown. To identify novel risk loci for glioma, we conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of two case-control series from France and Germany (2269 cases and 2500 controls). Pooling these data with previously reported UK and US GWA studies provided data on 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls genotyped for 424 460 common tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Using these data, we demonstrate two statistically independent associations between glioma and rs11979158 and rs2252586, at 7p11.2 which encompasses the EGFR gene (population-corrected statistics, P(c) = 7.72 × 10(-8) and 2.09 × 10(-8), respectively). Both associations were independent of tumor subtype, and were independent of EGFR amplification, p16INK4a deletion and IDH1 mutation status in tumors; compatible with driver effects of the variants on glioma development. These findings show that variation in 7p11.2 is a determinant of inherited glioma risk.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.