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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
On the feasibility of comprehensive high-resolution 3D remote dosimetry.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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This study investigates the feasibility of remote high-resolution 3D dosimetry with the PRESAGE®/Optical-CT system. In remote dosimetry, dosimeters are shipped out from a central base institution to a remote institution for irradiation, then shipped back to the base institution for subsequent readout and analysis.
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On the feasibility of polyurethane based 3D dosimeters with optical CT for dosimetric verification of low energy photon brachytherapy seeds.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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To investigate the feasibility of and challenges yet to be addressed to measure dose from low energy (effective energy <50 keV) brachytherapy sources (Pd-103, Cs-131, and I-125) using polyurethane based 3D dosimeters with optical CT.
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Use of bright light therapy among psychiatrists in massachusetts: an e-mail survey.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2014
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Evidence on the use of bright light therapy for conditions beyond seasonal affective disorder continues to accrue; however, data on the prevalent use of bright light therapy in the community or in hospitals remain limited, particularly in the United States.
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Bright light therapy for depression: a review of its effects on chronobiology and the autonomic nervous system.
Chronobiol. Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Bright light therapy (BLT) is considered among the first-line treatments for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), yet a growing body of literature supports its use in other neuropsychiatric conditions including non-seasonal depression. Despite evidence of its antidepressant efficacy, clinical use of BLT remains highly variable internationally. In this article, we explore the autonomic effects of BLT and suggest that such effects may play a role in its antidepressant and chronotherapeutic properties. After providing a brief introduction on the clinical application of BLT, we review the chronobiological effects of BLT on depression and on the autonomic nervous system in depressed and non-depressed individuals with an emphasis on non-seasonal depression. Such a theory of autonomic modulation via BLT could serve to integrate aspects of recent work centered on alleviating allostatic load, the polyvagal theory, the neurovisceral integration model and emerging evidence on the roles of glutamate and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GABA).
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A comprehensive investigation of the accuracy and reproducibility of a multitarget single isocenter VMAT radiosurgery technique.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 12-11-2013
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Purpose: Recent trends in stereotactic radiosurgery use multifocal volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans to simultaneously treat several distinct targets. Conventional verification often involves low resolution measurements in a single plane, a cylinder, or intersecting planes of diodes or ion chambers. This work presents an investigation into the consistency and reproducibility of this new treatment technique using a comprehensive commissioned high-resolution 3D dosimetry system (PRESAGE(®)?Optical-CT).Methods: A complex VMAT plan consisting of a single isocenter but five separate targets was created in Eclipse for a head phantom containing a cylindrical PRESAGE(®) dosimetry insert of 11 cm diameter and height. The plan contained five VMAT arcs delivering target doses from 12 to 20 Gy. The treatment was delivered to four dosimeters positioned in the head phantom and repeated four times, yielding four separate 3D dosimetry verifications. Each delivery was completely independent and was given after image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) positioning using Brainlab ExacTrac and cone beam computed tomography. A final delivery was given to a modified insert containing a pin-point ion chamber enabling calibration of PRESAGE(®) 3D data to dose. Dosimetric data were read out in an optical-CT scanner. Consistency and reproducibility of the treatment technique (including IGRT setup) was investigated by comparing the dose distributions in the four inserts, and with the predicted treatment planning system distribution.Results: Dose distributions from the four dosimeters were registered and analyzed to determine the mean and standard deviation at all points throughout the dosimeters. A dose standard deviation of <3% was found from dosimeter to dosimeter. Global 3D gamma maps show that the predicted and measured dose matched well [3D gamma passing rate was 98.0% (3%, 2 mm)].Conclusions: The deliveries of the irradiation were found to be consistent and matched the treatment plan, demonstrating high accuracy and reproducibility of both the treatment machine and the IGRT procedure. The complexity of the treatment (multiple arcs) and dosimetry (multiple strong gradients) pose a substantial challenge for comprehensive verification. 3D dosimetry can be uniquely effective in this scenario.
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The mind with a radio of its own: a case report and review of the literature on the treatment of musical hallucinations.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2013
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Musical hallucinations (MH) have been labeled Oliver Sacks syndrome, and in the majority of cases, they occur in the context of a hearing loss. In these instances, they have been described as auditory Charles Bonnet syndrome because they are thought to represent a cortical release phenomenon. Patients with MH tend to have intact reality testing, and as such, the condition may also be described as musical hallucinosis. The temporal course of MH is variable, but given that they may improve or remit with time, education on their benign nature is often sufficient. MH also may improve when hearing loss is reversed. The use of ambient noise potentially ameliorates mild to moderate MH; however, where this is insufficient, somatic treatments may be considered. Case reports have documented successful use of low-dose antiepileptics, atypical antipsychotics and donepezil. We present a case of a 52-year-old man who received only partial relief from serial treatment with several psychotropic agents. He developed major depression with suicidal ideation in the context of persistent, intrusive MH that were refractory to several medication trials, and whereas a course of electroconvulsive therapy led to remission of depressive and suicidal symptoms, it provided only transient relief of his MH. In this article, we also provide a review of the literature on the neurobiology and treatment of MH.
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On the need for comprehensive validation of deformable image registration, investigated with a novel 3-dimensional deformable dosimeter.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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To introduce and evaluate a novel deformable 3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system (Presage-Def/Optical-CT) and its application toward investigating the accuracy of dose deformation in a commercial deformable image registration (DIR) package.
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On the feasibility of optical-CT imaging in media of different refractive index.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Achieving accurate optical-CT 3D dosimetry without the use of viscous refractive index (RI) matching fluids would greatly increase convenience.
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Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths.
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Commissioning and benchmarking a 3D dosimetry system for clinical use.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2011
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A 3D dosimetry system is described which consists of two parts: a radiochromic plastic dosimeter PRESAGE (which responds to absorbed dose with a linear change in optical-density) and the Duke large-field-of-view optical-CT scanner (DLOS). The DLOS/PRESAGE system has recently been commissioned and benchmarked for clinical use and, in particular, for verification and commissioning of complex radiation treatments.
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Detrimental effects of divalproex on warfarin therapy following mechanical valve replacement.
J Card Surg
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2011
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Drug interaction between Warfarin and psychiatric agents may have important therapeutic effects for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We present a case of a patient in whom concurrent treatment with Warfarin and valproic acid resulted in supratherapeutic international normalized ratio values. A discussion of the possible mechanisms for this interaction as well as a review of interactions between Warfarin and other psychiatric medications is the subject of this case report.
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A method to correct for stray light in telecentric optical-CT imaging of radiochromic dosimeters.
Phys Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Radiochromic plastic and gel materials have recently emerged which can yield 3D dose information over clinical volumes in high resolution. These dosimeters can provide a much more comprehensive verification of complex radiation therapy treatments than can be achieved by conventional planar and point dosimeters. To achieve full clinical potential, these dosimeters require a fast and accurate read-out technology. Broad-beam optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) systems have shown promise, but can be sensitive to stray light artifacts originating in the imaging chain. In this work we present and evaluate a method to correct for stray light artifacts by deconvolving a measured, spatially invariant, point spread function (PSF). The correction was developed for the DLOS (Duke large field-of-view optical-CT scanner) in conjunction with radiochromic PRESAGE® dosimeters. The PSF was constructed from a series of acquisitions of projection images of various sized apertures placed in the optical imaging chain. Images were acquired with a range of exposure times, and for a range of aperture sizes (0.2-11 mm). The PSF is investigated under a variety of conditions, and found to be robust and spatially invariant, key factors enabling the viability of the deconvolution approach. The spatial invariance and robustness of the PSF are facilitated by telecentric imaging, which produces a collimated light beam and removes stray light originating upstream of the imaging lens. The telecentric capability of the DLOS therefore represents a significant advantage, both in keeping stray light levels to a minimum and enabling viability of an accurate PSF deconvolution method to correct for the residual. The performance of the correction method was evaluated on projection images containing known optical-density variations, and also on known 3D dose distributions. The method is shown to accurately account for stray light on small field dosimetry with corrections up to 3% in magnitude shown here although corrections of >10% have been observed in extreme cases. The dominant source of stray light was found to be within the imaging lens. Correcting for stray light extended the dynamic range of the system from ?30 to ?60 dB. The correction should be used when measurements need to be accurate within 3%.
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A method to correct for spectral artifacts in optical-CT dosimetry.
Phys Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2011
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The recent emergence of radiochromic dosimeters with low inherent light-scattering presents the possibility of fast 3D dosimetry using broad-beam optical computed tomography (optical-CT). Current broad beam scanners typically employ either a single or a planar array of light-emitting diodes (LED) for the light source. The spectrum of light from LED sources is polychromatic and this, in combination with the non-uniform spectral absorption of the dosimeter, can introduce spectral artifacts arising from preferential absorption of photons at the peak absorption wavelengths in the dosimeter. Spectral artifacts can lead to large errors in the reconstructed attenuation coefficients, and hence dose measurement. This work presents an analytic method for correcting for spectral artifacts which can be applied if the spectral characteristics of the light source, absorbing dosimeter, and imaging detector are known or can be measured. The method is implemented here for a PRESAGE® dosimeter scanned with the DLOS telecentric scanner (Duke Large field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner). Emission and absorption profiles were measured with a commercial spectrometer and spectrophotometer, respectively. Simulations are presented that show spectral changes can introduce errors of 8% for moderately attenuating samples where spectral artifacts are less pronounced. The correction is evaluated by application to a 16 cm diameter PRESAGE® cylindrical dosimeter irradiated along the axis with two partially overlapping 6 × 6 cm fields of different doses. The resulting stepped dose distribution facilitates evaluation of the correction as each step had different spectral contributions. The spectral artifact correction was found to accurately correct the reconstructed coefficients to within ?1.5%, improved from ?7.5%, for normalized dose distributions. In conclusion, for situations where spectral artifacts cannot be removed by physical filters, the method shown here is an effective correction. Physical filters may be less viable if they introduce strong sensitivity to Schlieren bands in the dosimeters.
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Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2011
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Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of dosimeters, from secondary standards to field instruments, is established to assure the quantitative nature of the tests. This report is intended to describe the characteristics of the components of these systems; dosimeters, phantoms, and dose evaluation algorithms. This work is the report of AAPM Task Group 120.
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An investigation into a new re-useable 3D radiochromic dosimetry material, Presage.
J Phys Conf Ser
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2010
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PURPOSE: To investigate the dosimetric properties of a new Presage formulation which exhibits a reversible color change on exposure to radiation. Presage(REU) offers the intriguing possibility of the first re-useable 3D dosimetry material. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Small volumes of Presage(REU) in 1×1×5cm optical cuvettes were irradiated and re-irradiated under a variety of conditions and times to investigate a range of properties including re-usability, dose-rate dependence, dose sensitivity, temporal response, energy sensitivity, and temperature dependence. RESULTS: The radiation induced change in optical density (OD) was found to be linear with dose after initial and subsequent irradiations. After the first irradiation OD was observed to clear in ~2 weeks when stored at room temperature. 3 subsequent irradiations of the same cuvettes showed a very similar strong OD response, although there was a significant increase between this response and that achieve at initial irradiation. CONCLUSION: The Presage(REU) formulation shows strong potential as the first re-useable 3D dosimetry material. When dosimeters are stored at room temperature (~22°C) clearing can occur in 2-3 weeks.
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A comprehensive method for optical-emission computed tomography.
Phys Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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Optical-computed tomography (CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (ECT) are recent techniques with potential for high-resolution multi-faceted 3D imaging of the structure and function in unsectioned tissue samples up to 1-4 cc. Quantitative imaging of 3D fluorophore distribution (e.g. GFP) using optical-ECT is challenging due to attenuation present within the sample. Uncorrected reconstructed images appear hotter near the edges than at the center. A similar effect is seen in SPECT/PET imaging, although an important difference is attenuation occurs for both emission and excitation photons. This work presents a way to implement not only the emission attenuation correction utilized in SPECT, but also excitation attenuation correction and source strength modeling which are unique to optical-ECT. The performance of the correction methods was investigated by the use of a cylindrical gelatin phantom whose central region was filled with a known distribution of attenuation and fluorophores. Uncorrected and corrected reconstructions were compared to a sectioned slice of the phantom imaged using a fluorescent dissecting microscope. Significant attenuation artifacts were observed in uncorrected images and appeared up to 80% less intense in the central regions due to attenuation and an assumed uniform light source. The corrected reconstruction showed agreement throughout the verification image with only slight variations ( approximately 5%). Final experiments demonstrate the correction in tissue as applied to a tumor with constitutive RFP.
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Investigation into the feasibility of using PRESAGE/optical-CT dosimetry for the verification of gating treatments.
Phys Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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This work presents an investigation into the use of PRESAGE dosimeters with an optical-CT scanner as a 3D dosimetry system for quantitative verification of respiratory-gated treatments. The CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was modified to incorporate a moving PRESAGE dosimeter-simulating respiration motion in the lungs. A simple AP/PA lung treatment plan was delivered three times to the phantom containing a different but geometrically identical PRESAGE insert each time. Each delivery represented a treatment scenario: static, motion (free-breathing) and gated. The dose distributions, in the three dosimeters, were digitized by the optical-CT scanner. Improved optical-CT readout yielded an increased signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 3 and decreased reconstruction artifacts compared with prior work. Independent measurements of dose distributions were obtained in the central plane using EBT film. Dose distributions were normalized to a point corresponding to the 100% isodose region prior to the measurement of dose profiles and gamma maps. These measurements were used to quantify the agreement between measured and ECLIPSE(R) dose distributions. Average gamma pass rates between PRESAGE and EBT were >99% (criteria 3% dose difference and 1.2 mm distance-to-agreement) for all three treatments. Gamma pass rates between PRESAGE and ECLIPSE(R) 3D dose distributions showed excellent agreement for the gated treatment (100% pass rate), but poor for the motion scenario (85% pass rate). This work demonstrates the feasibility of using PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry to verify gating-enabled radiation treatments. The capability of the Varian gating system to compensate for motion in this treatment scenario was demonstrated.
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Toward acquiring comprehensive radiosurgery field commissioning data using the PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system.
Phys Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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Achieving accurate small field dosimetry is challenging. This study investigates the utility of a radiochromic plastic PRESAGE read with optical-CT for the acquisition of radiosurgery field commissioning data from a Novalis Tx system with a high-definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC). Total scatter factors (Sc, p), beam profiles, and penumbrae were measured for five different radiosurgery fields (5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using a commercially available optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS, MGS Research). The percent depth dose (PDD), beam profile and penumbra of the 10 mm field were also measured using a higher resolution in-house prototype CCD-based scanner. Gafchromic EBT film was used for independent verification. Measurements of Sc, p made with PRESAGE and film agreed with mini-ion chamber commissioning data to within 4% for every field (range 0.2-3.6% for PRESAGE, and 1.6-3.6% for EBT). PDD, beam profile and penumbra measurements made with the two PRESAGE/optical-CT systems and film showed good agreement with the high-resolution diode commissioning measurements with a competitive resolution (0.5 mm pixels). The in-house prototype optical-CT scanner allowed much finer resolution compared with previous applications of PRESAGE. The advantages of the PRESAGE system for small field dosimetry include 3D measurements, negligible volume averaging, directional insensitivity, an absence of beam perturbations, energy and dose rate independence.
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Investigation of the feasibility of relative 3D dosimetry in the Radiologic Physics Center Head and Neck IMRT phantom using presage/optical-CT.
Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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This study presents the application of the Presage/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system for relative dosimetry in the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) Head and Neck (H&N) IMRT phantom. Performance of the system was evaluated by comparison with the "gold-standard" RPC credentialing test. A modified Presage cylindrical insert was created that extended the capability of the RPC H&N phantom to 3D dosimetry. The RPC phantom was taken through the entire treatment planning procedure with both the standard RPC insert and the modified Presage insert. An IMRT plan was created to match the desired dose constraints of the credentialing test. This plan was delivered twice to the RPC phantom: first containing the standard insert, and then again containing the Presage insert. After irradiation, the standard insert was sent for routine credentialing analysis; including point dose measurements (TLD) and planar Gafchromic EBT film measurement. The 3D dose distribution from Presage was read out at Duke using the OCTOPUS 5X optical-CT scanner. The Presage distribution was compared with gold-standard EBT measurement (determined by the RPC) and the calculated Eclipse distribution. The agreement between the normalized EBT, Presage, and Eclipse distributions, in the central axial plane was evaluated using profiles and gamma-map comparisons (4% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement). Profiles showed good agreement between EBT, Presage, and Eclipse distributions. 2D gamma-map comparisons between all three modalities showed at least 98% pass rate. The excellent agreement between Presage and EBT in the central plane established Presage as a standard against which to evaluate the accuracy of the 3D calculated Eclipse distribution. A gamma comparison between normalized Presage and Eclipse 3D distributions gave an overall pass rate of approximately 94%. In conclusion, the Presage/optical-CT system was found to be feasible for relative 3D dosimetry in the RPC IMRT H&N phantom. The potential to extend the RPC IMRT credentialing procedure to 3D may be feasible provided accurate calibration to dose (Gy) and robustness to shipping stress are demonstrated.
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Pellagrous encephalopathy presenting as alcohol withdrawal delirium: a case series and literature review.
Addict Sci Clin Pract
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Alcohol withdrawal delirium (AWD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Pellagra (niacin deficiency) can be a cause of delirium during alcohol withdrawal that may often be overlooked.
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Feasibility of using PRESAGE® for relative 3D dosimetry of small proton fields.
Phys Med Biol
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Small field dosimetry is challenging due to the finite size of the conventional detectors that underestimate the dose distribution. With the fast development of the dynamic proton beam delivery system, it is essential to find a dosimeter which can be used for 3D dosimetry of small proton fields. We investigated the feasibility of using a proton formula PRESAGE® for 3D dosimetry of small fields in a uniform scanning proton beam delivery system with dose layer stacking technology. The relationship between optical density and the absorbed dose was found to be linear through small volume cuvette studies for both photon and proton irradiation. Two circular fields and three patient-specific fields were used for proton treatment planning calculation and beam delivery. The measured results were compared with the calculated results in the form of lateral dose profiles, depth dose, isodose plots and gamma index analysis. For the circular field study, lateral dose profile comparison showed that the relative PRESAGE® profile falls within ± 5% from the calculated profile for most of the spatial range. For unmodulated depth dose comparison, the agreement between the measured and calculated results was within 3% in the beam entrance region before the Bragg peak. However, at the Bragg peak, there was about 20% underestimation of the absorbed dose from PRESAGE®. For patient-specific field 3D dosimetry, most of the data points within the target volume passed gamma analysis for 3% relative dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement criteria. Our results suggest that this proton formula PRESAGE® dosimeter has the potential for 3D dosimetry of small fields in proton therapy, but further investigation is needed to improve the dose under-response of the PRESAGE® in the Bragg peak region.
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Drug-drug interactions between warfarin and psychotropics: updated review of the literature.
Pharmacotherapy
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As the number of psychotropics on the market expands, the likelihood increases that a patient requiring anticoagulation with warfarin will receive concurrent treatment with a psychotropic drug. Because warfarin undergoes hepatic metabolism and is highly protein bound, it is particularly prone to drug interactions; in addition, its relatively narrow therapeutic window places patients at risk of either hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Although warfarins interactions with other drugs have long been studied, the most recent review of the literature of warfarins interactions with psychotropics was over a decade ago. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the literature documenting the interaction between warfarin and psychotropics, with a focus on interactions mediated through the cytochrome P450 system and protein binding. A search of the MEDLINE database was performed, and reports of warfarin interactions with psychotropics were identified. The results suggest that interactions between warfarin and psychotropic drugs are important and likely underrecognized. They also have notable implications for both safety and drug compliance. When certain psychotropics are started or discontinued in patients receiving warfarin therapy, or when warfarin is introduced to a patient receiving a stable dose of a psychotropic, clinicians should monitor a patients international normalized ratio (INR) closely to ensure it remains within therapeutic range. Psychotropics that pose a particular risk of increasing the INR when used with warfarin include fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, quetiapine, and valproic acid. Psychotropics that may significantly decrease the INR when used with warfarin include trazodone, St. Johns wort, carbamazepine, and the polycyclic aromatic carbons in tobacco cigarettes; however, nicotine itself, as in nicotine replacement strategies, is not known to alter warfarins anticoagulant effect. In certain cases, the need for anticoagulation may also necessitate switching to a different psychotropic.
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Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry.
Med Phys
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To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T&O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry.
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Submerged RadBall® deployments in Hanford Site hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules.
Health Phys
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The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate that a new technology, known as RadBall®, could locate submerged radiological hazards. RadBall® is a novel, passive, radiation detection device that provides a 3-D visualization of radiation from areas where measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access or extremely high radiation doses. This technology has been under development during recent years, and all of its previous tests have included dry deployments. This study involved, for the first time, underwater RadBall® deployments in hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. RadBall® can be used to characterize a contaminated room, hot cell, or glovebox by providing the locations of the radiation sources and hazards, identifying the radionuclides present within the cell, and determining the radiation sources strength (e.g., intensities or dose rates). These parameters have been previously determined for dry deployments; however, only the location of radiation sources and hazards can be determined for an underwater RadBall® deployment. The results from this study include 3-D images representing the location of the radiation sources within the Hanford Site cells. Due to RadBall®s unique deployability and non-electrical nature, this technology shows significant promise for future characterization of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities.
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A quality assurance method that utilizes 3D dosimetry and facilitates clinical interpretation.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
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To demonstrate a new three-dimensional (3D) quality assurance (QA) method that provides comprehensive dosimetry verification and facilitates evaluation of the clinical significance of QA data acquired in a phantom. Also to apply the method to investigate the dosimetric efficacy of base-of-skull (BOS) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment.
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Locating radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas by implementing a reverse ray tracing technique in the RadBall™ technology.
Health Phys
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RadBall™ is a novel technology that can locate unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semisphere. The collimator has a number of small holes; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation, becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semisphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution three-dimensional map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data, using a reverse ray tracing technique, provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area, forming a three-dimensional characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall™ technology and its reverse ray tracing technique were investigated using known radiation sources at the Savannah River Sites Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory and unknown sources at the Savannah River National Laboratorys Shielded Cells facility.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.