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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Falx chondroma with hyperostosis of the scull: a case report.
Srp Arh Celok Lek
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2014
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Intracranial chondroma is a very rare, slow growing, benign cartilaginous tumor that arises usually from the base of the scull. Chondroma located at the falx is extremely rare. According to our best knowledge 15 cases of falx chondromas have been reported in the literature.
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Proceedings of the first workshop on Peripheral Machine Interfaces: going beyond traditional surface electromyography.
Front Neurorobot
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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One of the hottest topics in rehabilitation robotics is that of proper control of prosthetic devices. Despite decades of research, the state of the art is dramatically behind the expectations. To shed light on this issue, in June, 2013 the first international workshop on Present and future of non-invasive peripheral nervous system (PNS)-Machine Interfaces (MI; PMI) was convened, hosted by the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. The keyword PMI has been selected to denote human-machine interfaces targeted at the limb-deficient, mainly upper-limb amputees, dealing with signals gathered from the PNS in a non-invasive way, that is, from the surface of the residuum. The workshop was intended to provide an overview of the state of the art and future perspectives of such interfaces; this paper represents is a collection of opinions expressed by each and every researcher/group involved in it.
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Stereovision and augmented reality for closed-loop control of grasping in hand prostheses.
J Neural Eng
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2014
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Technologically advanced assistive devices are nowadays available to restore grasping, but effective and effortless control integrating both feed-forward (commands) and feedback (sensory information) is still missing. The goal of this work was to develop a user friendly interface for the semi-automatic and closed-loop control of grasping and to test its feasibility.
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Surgical treatment of intradiploic epidermoid cyst treated as depression.
Srp Arh Celok Lek
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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Extradural intradiploic epidermoid cysts are rare, representing less than 0.25% of all primary intracranial tumors. They can be neurologically silent and can only present psychiatric symptoms like depression, cognitive or personality changes.
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Microsoft kinect-based artificial perception system for control of functional electrical stimulation assisted grasping.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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We present a computer vision algorithm that incorporates a heuristic model which mimics a biological control system for the estimation of control signals used in functional electrical stimulation (FES) assisted grasping. The developed processing software acquires the data from Microsoft Kinect camera and implements real-time hand tracking and object analysis. This information can be used to identify temporal synchrony and spatial synergies modalities for FES control. Therefore, the algorithm acts as artificial perception which mimics human visual perception by identifying the position and shape of the object with respect to the position of the hand in real time during the planning phase of the grasp. This artificial perception used within the heuristically developed model allows selection of the appropriate grasp and prehension. The experiments demonstrate that correct grasp modality was selected in more than 90% of tested scenarios/objects. The system is portable, and the components are low in cost and robust; hence, it can be used for the FES in clinical or even home environment. The main application of the system is envisioned for functional electrical therapy, that is, intensive exercise assisted with FES.
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Management of complication from temporal bone fractures.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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The objective of the study is to review clinical findings and outcomes in patients with temporal bone fractures, and to show an incidence and management of complications. It is the retrospective clinical study and the study took place at tertiary referral center. Fifty-two patients with temporal bone fractures. Data were collected from patients charts and clinical review. Patients were classified into five groups according to the CT scan. The primary endpoint of study was to show management of possible complication from temporal bone fractures and to analyze association with intracranial injuries. The second endpoint was to show incompleteness of traditionally classification of fracture type. Of the 52 patients with 54 fractures, 27 (50%) had longitudinal fractures, 4 (7.4%) had transverse fractures, 17 (31.5%) had temporal squama-mastoid fractures, 4 (7.4%) had mixed fractures and 2 (3.7%) had isolated meatal fracture. Fifty-eight percent of patients had at least one intracranial pathologic finding, of which 11% had two or more. Persistent conductive hearing loss was noted in 8 of 16 affected patients. The facial paralysis occurred in seven patients. One patient had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo developed 3 weeks after injury. In conclusion, rarely temporal bone fractures are isolated injures. The squama-mastoid fracture in most cases associated with intracranial injuries. Coordination between the neurosurgeon and otologist is essential in the care of such patients. Further large studies will be done to give a more complete classification of temporal bone fractures which will include all fracture patterns and predict clinical outcome.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.