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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Incidence of Mechanical Complications of Central Venous Catheterization Using Landmark Technique: Do Not Try More Than 3 Times.
J Intensive Care Med
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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Central venous catheterization is a standard procedure in intensive care therapy. In developing countries, this intervention is frequently performed by physicians in training and without the availability of ultrasound guidance. Purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and potential risk factors for mechanical complications during central venous catheterization in an intensive care setting performed by a mixed group of practitioners without the use of adjunct ultrasound.
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Lorazepam does not improve the quality of recovery in day-case surgery patients: a randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial.
Eur J Anaesthesiol
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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In day-case surgery, the effects of the anxiolytic lorazepam as premedication on the quality of postoperative recovery are unknown.
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Perioperative fluid management and use of vasoactive and antithrombotic agents in free flap surgery: a literature review and clinical recommendations.
J Reconstr Microsurg
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2013
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After reading this article, the participant should be able to (1) outline the rationale for different perioperative types of fluid therapy in free flap surgery and identify the methods considered best for flap survival; (2) understand the current views on the use of vasoactive agents and consider its possible safe use; (3) compare the most commonly used intraoperative and postoperative anticoagulant therapies and identify the risks and benefits associated with each.
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Effect of major and minor surgery on plasma levels of arginine, citrulline, nitric oxide metabolites, and ornithine in humans.
Ann. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2013
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To determine the effect of surgical invasiveness on plasma levels of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and nitric oxide (NO) in humans.
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[Awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection - what does the anaesthesist do?].
Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2011
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The numbers of awake craniotomies performed worldwide are rising. The technique allows a maximum of brain tumor resection with a minimal risk of functional damage in patients, where the tumor is growing close to functional relevant brain areas. The maximal resection improves the long-term outcome of these patients. For the anaesthetist awake craniotomy can be challenging, because he misses the advantages of general anaesthesia (safe airway, suppressed reflexes), but has to deal with the added risks of brain mapping and cortical stimulation (induction of epileptic insults). After adequate patient selection and intense (psychological) preparation a careful anaesthesiologist will be able to accompany the patient throughout this procedure safe and comfortable. This article describes the anaesthesiological management at Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, The Netherlands, in detail.
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Antiepileptic drug therapy in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2010
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Antiepileptic agents are widely used in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients - for prophylactic and therapeutic reasons. However, the evidence supporting their use is extremely small and adverse events are common. This review highlights the current controversies.
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Awake craniotomy induces fewer changes in the plasma amino acid profile than craniotomy under general anesthesia.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2009
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In this prospective, observational, 2-armed study, we compared the plasma amino acid profiles of patients undergoing awake craniotomy to those undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups were also compared with a healthy, age-matched and sex-matched reference group not undergoing surgery. It is our intention to investigate whether plasma amino acid levels provide information about physical and emotional stress, as well as pain during awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups received preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative dexamethasone. The plasma levels of 20 amino acids were determined preoperative, perioperative, and postoperatively in all groups and were correlated with subjective markers for pain, stress, and anxiety. In both craniotomy groups, preoperative levels of tryptophan and valine were significantly decreased whereas glutamate, alanine, and arginine were significantly increased relative to the reference group. Throughout time, tryptophan levels were significantly lower in the general anesthesia group versus the awake craniotomy group. The general anesthesia group had a significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio, which may suggest higher oxidative stress, than the awake group throughout time. Between experimental groups, a significant increase in large neutral amino acids was found postoperatively in awake craniotomy patients, pain was also less and recovery was faster. A significant difference in mean hospitalization time was also found, with awake craniotomy patients leaving after 4.53+/-2.12 days and general anesthesia patients after 6.17+/-1.62 days; P=0.012. This study demonstrates that awake craniotomy is likely to be physically and emotionally less stressful than general anesthesia and that amino acid profiling holds promise for monitoring postoperative pain and recovery.
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Inflammatory profile of awake function-controlled craniotomy and craniotomy under general anesthesia.
Mediators Inflamm.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2009
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Surgical stress triggers an inflammatory response and releases mediators into human plasma such as interleukins (ILs). Awake craniotomy and craniotomy performed under general anesthesia may be associated with different levels of stress. Our aim was to investigate whether those procedures cause different inflammatory responses.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.