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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Metabolomic profiling of schizophrenia patients at risk for metabolic syndrome.
Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are commonly used to treat schizophrenia. However, SGAs cause metabolic disturbances that can manifest as metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a subset of patients. The causes for these metabolic disturbances remain unclear. We performed a comprehensive metabolomic profiling of 60 schizophrenia patients undergoing treatment with SGAs that puts them at high (clozapine, olanzapine), medium (quetiapine, risperidone), or low (ziprasidone, aripiprazole) risk for developing MetS, compared to a cohort of 20 healthy controls. Multiplex immunoassays were used to measure 13 metabolic hormones and adipokines in plasma. Mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of lipids and polar metabolites in 29 patients and 10 controls. We found that levels of insulin and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) were significantly higher (p < 0.005) in patients at medium and high risk for MetS, compared to controls. These molecules are known to be increased in individuals with high body fat content and obesity. On the other hand, adiponectin, a molecule responsible for control of food intake and body weight, was significantly decreased in patients at medium and high risk for MetS (p < 0.005). Further, levels of dyacylglycerides (DG), tryacylglycerides (TG) and cholestenone were increased, whereas ?-Ketoglutarate and malate, important mediators of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, were significantly decreased in patients compared to controls. Our studies suggest that high- and medium-risk SGAs are associated with disruption of energy metabolism pathways. These findings may shed light on the molecular underpinnings of antipsychotic-induced MetS and aid in design of novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the side effects associated with these drugs.
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CD8?? dendritic cells improve collagen-induced arthritis in CC chemokine receptor (CCR)-2 deficient mice.
Immunobiology
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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Dendritic cells (DCs) have long been recognized as potential therapeutic targets of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increasing evidence has showed that DCs are capable of suppressing autoimmunity by expanding FoxP3? regulatory T cells (T(reg)), which in turn exert immunosuppression by increasing TGF?-1. In the SKG mice, activated DC prime autoreactive T cells causing autoantibody production and an inflammatory arthritic response. Recently, we reported that CC-chemokine receptor-2 deficient (Ccr2?/?) mice had impaired DCs migration and reduced CD8?? DCs in the C57Bl/6J mice strain and that these mice were more susceptible to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), compared to wild type mice. To examine the mechanism by which DCs contribute to the increased susceptibility of arthritis in Ccr2?/? mice, we tested the hypothesis that CD8?? DCs are protective (tolerogenic) against autoimmune arthritis by examining the role of CD8?? DCs in Ccr2?/? and SKG mice.
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CCR2 plays a critical role in dendritic cell maturation: possible role of CCL2 and NF-kappa B.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2010
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We postulated that CCR2-driven activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a critical role in dendritic cell (DC) maturation (e.g., migration, costimulation, and IL-12p70 production), necessary for the generation of protective immune responses against the intracellular pathogen Leishmania major. Supporting this notion, we found that CCR2, its ligand CCL2, and NF-kappaB were required for CCL19 production and adequate Langerhans cell (LC) migration both ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, a role for CCR2 in upregulating costimulatory molecules was indicated by the reduced expression of CD80, CD86, and CD40 in Ccr2(-/-) bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) compared with wild-type (WT) BMDCs. Four lines of evidence suggested that CCR2 plays a critical role in the induction of protective immunity against L. major by regulating IL-12p70 production and migration of DC populations such as LCs. First, compared with WT, Ccr2(-/-) lymph node cells, splenocytes, BMDCs, and LCs produced lower levels of IL-12p70 following stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma or L. major. Second, a reduced number of LCs carried L. major from the skin to the draining lymph nodes in Ccr2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Third, early treatment with exogenous IL-12 reversed the susceptibility to L. major infection in Ccr2(-/-) mice. Finally, disruption of IL-12p70 in radioresistant cells, such as LCs, but not in BMDCs resulted in the inability to mount a fully protective immune response in bone marrow chimeric mice. Collectively, our data point to an important role for CCR2-driven activation of NF-kappaB in the regulation of DC/LC maturation processes that regulate protective immunity against intracellular pathogens.
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In vivo and in vitro genetic evidence of involvement of neuregulin 1 in immune system dysregulation.
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) has been implicated in several disorders including breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Also, recent evidence suggests that NRG1 may play a role in regulation of inflammation and immune system response. We therefore hypothesized that a schizophrenia-associated missense mutation (valine to leucine) we identified within the transmembrane region of NRG1 would also be linked to immune dysregulation. We used plasma samples from families carrying the mutation to measure levels of antibodies to 41 autoimmune markers and six cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, IL-12p70, and TNF-?) and used these levels as quantitative traits to evaluate association with the NRG1 mutation, using FBAT. Next, we used Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells from heterozygous mutation carriers and wild-type individuals to evaluate protein and mRNA cytokine expression in vitro using quantitative PCR and ELISA assays. In vivo, increased levels of 25 autoimmune markers as well as elevated levels of cytokines were significantly associated with the NRG1 mutation. In vitro, we observed a significant increase in protein secretion levels of IL-6, TNF-?, and IL-8 in mutation carriers compared with controls. At the mRNA level, we observed a significant increase in IL-6 expression, while IL-4 levels appeared to be down-regulated in heterozygous individuals compared with wild-type controls. This is the first report of association of a NRG1 mutation with immune dysregulation. This study could contribute towards understanding the role of NRG1 in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other disorders in which inflammation plays an important role.
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Metabolomics tools for identifying biomarkers for neuropsychiatric diseases.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2009
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The repertoire of biochemicals (or small molecules) present in cells, tissue, and body fluids is known as the metabolome. Today, clinicians utilize only a very small part of the information contained in the metabolome, as revealed by the quantification of a limited set of analytes to gain information on human health. Examples include measuring glucose or cholesterol to monitor diabetes and cardiovascular health, respectively. With a focus on comprehensively studying the metabolome, the rapidly growing field of metabolomics captures the metabolic state of organisms at the global or "-omics" level. Given that the overall health status of an individual is captured by his or her metabolic state, which is a reflection of what has been encoded by the genome and modified by environmental factors, metabolomics has the potential to have a great impact upon medical practice by providing a wealth of relevant biochemical data. Metabolomics promises to improve current, single metabolites-based clinical assessments by identifying metabolic signatures (biomarkers) that embody global biochemical changes in disease, predict responses to treatment or medication side effects (pharmachometabolomics). State of the art metabolomic analytical platforms and informatics tools are being used to map potential biomarkers for a multitude of disorders including those of the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, CNS disorders are linked to disturbances in metabolic pathways related to neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate); fatty acids such as arachidonic acid-cascade; oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. Metabolomics tools are enabling us to map in greater detail perturbations in many biochemical pathways and links among these pathways this information is key for development of biomarkers that are disease-specific. In this review, we elaborate on some of the concepts and technologies used in metabolomics and its promise for biomarker discovery. We also highlight early findings from metabolomic studies in CNS disorders such as schizophrenia, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), Bipolar Disorder (BD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinsons disease (PD).
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CCR5 expression levels influence NFAT translocation, IL-2 production, and subsequent signaling events during T lymphocyte activation.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2009
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Ligands of CCR5, the major coreceptor of HIV-1, costimulate T lymphocyte activation. However, the full impact of CCR5 expression on T cell responses remains unknown. Here, we show that compared with CCR5(+/+), T cells from CCR5(-/-) mice secrete lower amounts of IL-2, and a similar phenotype is observed in humans who lack CCR5 expression (CCR5-Delta32/Delta32 homozygotes) as well as after Ab-mediated blockade of CCR5 in human T cells genetically intact for CCR5 expression. Conversely, overexpression of CCR5 in human T cells results in enhanced IL-2 production. CCR5 surface levels correlate positively with IL-2 protein and mRNA abundance, suggesting that CCR5 affects IL-2 gene regulation. Signaling via CCR5 resulted in NFAT transactivation in T cells that was blocked by Abs against CCR5 agonists, suggesting a link between CCR5 and downstream pathways that influence IL-2 expression. Furthermore, murine T cells lacking CCR5 had reduced levels of intranuclear NFAT following activation. Accordingly, CCR5 expression also promoted IL-2-dependent events, including CD25 expression, STAT5 phosphorylation, and T cell proliferation. We therefore suggest that by influencing a NFAT-mediated pathway that regulates IL-2 production and IL-2-dependent events, CCR5 may play a critical role in T cell responses. In accord with our prior inferences from genetic-epidemiologic studies, such CCR5-dependent responses might constitute a viral entry-independent mechanism by which CCR5 may influence HIV-AIDS pathogenesis.
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Important role of CCR2 in a murine model of coronary vasculitis.
BMC Immunol.
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Chemokines and their receptors play a role in the innate immune response as well as in the disruption of the balance between pro-inflammatory Th17 cells and regulatory T cells (Treg), underlying the pathogenesis of coronary vasculitis in Kawasaki disease (KD).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.