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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of pathways for bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis.
JAMA Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Genome-wide investigations provide systematic information regarding the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders.
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The somatic common deletion in mitochondrial DNA is decreased in schizophrenia.
Schizophr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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Large deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can occur during or result from oxidative stress leading to a vicious cycle that increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage and decreases mitochondrial function, thereby causing further oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine if disease specific brain differences of the somatic mtDNA common deletion (4977bp) could be observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BD), and schizophrenia (SZ) compared to a control group. The accumulation of the mtDNA common deletion was measured using a quantitative assay across 10 brain regions (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, caudate nucleus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, orbitofrontal cortex, putamen, substantia nigra, and thalamus). The correlation with age of the mtDNA deletion was highly significant across brain regions as previously shown. A significant decrease in the global accumulation of common deletion in subjects with SZ compared to MDD, BD, and controls was observed after correcting for age, pH, PMI, and gender. The decreases in SZ were largest in dopaminergic regions. One potential side effect of antipsychotic drugs on mitochondria is the impairment of mitochondria function, which might explain these findings. The decreased global brain mtDNA common deletion levels suggests that mitochondrial function is impaired and might be part of an overall mitochondria dysfunction signature in subjects with schizophrenia.
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Inherited mitochondrial DNA variants can affect complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways: insights into mitochondrial-nuclear interactions.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in developed countries. While linked to genetic polymorphisms in the complement pathway, there are many individuals with high risk alleles that do not develop AMD, suggesting that other 'modifiers' may be involved. Mitochondrial (mt) haplogroups, defined by accumulations of specific mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which represent population origins, may be one such modifier. J haplogroup has been associated with high risk for AMD while the H haplogroup is protective. It has been difficult to assign biological consequences for haplogroups so we created human ARPE-19 cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which have identical nuclei but mitochondria of either J or H haplogroups, to investigate their effects upon bioenergetics and molecular pathways. J cybrids have altered bioenergetic profiles compared with H cybrids. Q-PCR analyses show significantly lower expression levels for seven respiratory complex genes encoded by mtDNA. J and H cybrids have significantly altered expression of eight nuclear genes of the alternative complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways. Sequencing of the entire mtDNA was carried out for all the cybrids to identify haplogroup and non-haplogroup defining SNPs. mtDNA can mediate cellular bioenergetics and expression levels of nuclear genes related to complement, inflammation and apoptosis. Sequencing data suggest that observed effects are not due to rare mtDNA variants but rather the combination of SNPs representing the J versus H haplogroups. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our concepts of mt-nuclear interactions.
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A splice donor mutation in NAA10 results in the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signalling pathway and causes Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.
J. Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is a genetically heterogeneous X-linked disorder characterised by microphthalmia/anophthalmia, skeletal abnormalities, genitourinary malformations, and anomalies of the digits, ears, and teeth. Intellectual disability and seizure disorders are seen in about 60% of affected males. To date, no gene has been identified for LMS in the microphthalmia syndrome 1 locus (MCOPS1). In this study, we aim to find the disease-causing gene for this condition.
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Evidence of allelic imbalance in the schizophrenia susceptibility gene ZNF804A in human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.
Schizophr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2013
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The rs1344706, an intronic SNP within the zinc-finger protein 804A gene (ZNF804A), was identified as one of the most compelling risk SNPs for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). It is however not clear by which molecular mechanisms ZNF804A increases disease risk. We evaluated the role of ZNF804A in SZ and BD by genotyping the originally associated rs1344706 SNP and an exonic SNP (rs12476147) located in exon four of ZNF804A in a sample of 422 SZ, 382 BD, and 507 controls from the isolated population of the Costa Rica Central Valley. We also investigated the rs1344706 SNP for allelic specific expression (ASE) imbalance in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of 46 heterozygous postmortem brains. While no significant association between rs1344706 and SZ or BD was observed in the Costa Rica sample, we observed an increased risk of SZ for the minor allele (A) of the exonic rs12476147 SNP (p=0.026). Our ASE assay detected a significant over-expression of the rs12476147 A allele in DLPFC of rs1344706 heterozygous subjects. Interestingly, cDNA allele ratios were significantly different according to the intronic rs1344706 genotypes (p-value=0.03), with the rs1344706 A allele associated with increased ZNF804A rs12476147 A allele expression (average 1.06, p-value=0.02, for heterozygous subjects vs. genomic DNA). In conclusion, we have demonstrated a significant association of rs12476147 with SZ, and using a powerful within-subject design, an allelic expression imbalance of ZNF804A exonic SNP rs12476147 in the DLPFC. Although this data does not preclude the possibility of other functional variants in ZNF804A, it provides evidence that the rs1344706 SZ risk allele is the cis-regulatory variant directly responsible for this allelic expression imbalance in adult cortex.
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Molecular and bioenergetic differences between cells with African versus European inherited mitochondrial DNA haplogroups: Implications for population susceptibility to diseases.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2013
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The geographic origins of populations can be identified by their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. This study compared human cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which are cell lines with identical nuclei but mitochondria from different individuals with mtDNA from either the H haplogroup or L haplogroup backgrounds. The most common European haplogroup is H while individuals of maternal African origin are of the L haplogroup. Despite lower mtDNA copy numbers, L cybrids had higher expression levels for nine mtDNA-encoded respiratory complex genes, decreased ATP (adenosine triphosphate) turnover rates and lower levels of reactive oxygen species production, parameters which are consistent with more efficient oxidative phosphorylation. Surprisingly, GeneChip arrays showed that the L and H cybrids had major differences in expression of genes of the canonical complement system (5 genes), dermatan/chondroitin sulfate biosynthesis (5 genes) and CCR3 (chemokine, CC motif, receptor 3) signaling (9 genes). Quantitative nuclear gene expression studies confirmed that L cybrids had (a) lower expression levels of complement pathway and innate immunity genes and (b) increased levels of inflammation-related signaling genes, which are critical in human diseases. Our data support the hypothesis that mtDNA haplogroups representing populations from different geographic origins may play a role in differential susceptibilities to diseases.
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Conserved chromosome 2q31 conformations are associated with transcriptional regulation of GAD1 GABA synthesis enzyme and altered in prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2013
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Little is known about chromosomal loopings involving proximal promoter and distal enhancer elements regulating GABAergic gene expression, including changes in schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions linked to altered inhibition. Here, we map in human chromosome 2q31 the 3D configuration of 200 kb of linear sequence encompassing the GAD1 GABA synthesis enzyme gene locus, and we describe a loop formation involving the GAD1 transcription start site and intergenic noncoding DNA elements facilitating reporter gene expression. The GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop) was enriched with nucleosomes epigenetically decorated with the transcriptional mark, histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4, and was weak or absent in skin fibroblasts and pluripotent stem cells compared with neuronal cultures differentiated from them. In the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop) was decreased compared with controls, in conjunction with downregulated GAD1 expression. We generated transgenic mice expressing Gad2 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein-conjugated histone H2B and confirmed that Gad1-TSS(-55kbLoop), the murine homolog to GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop), is a chromosomal conformation specific for GABAergic neurons. In primary neuronal culture, Gad1-TSS(-55kbLoop) and Gad1 expression became upregulated when neuronal activity was increased. We conclude that 3D genome architectures, including chromosomal loopings for promoter-enhancer interactions involved in the regulation of GABAergic gene expression, are conserved between the rodent and primate brain, and subject to developmental and activity-dependent regulation, and disordered in some cases with schizophrenia. More broadly, the findings presented here draw a connection between noncoding DNA, spatial genome architecture, and neuronal plasticity in development and disease.
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Circadian patterns of gene expression in the human brain and disruption in major depressive disorder.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2013
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A cardinal symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD) is the disruption of circadian patterns. However, to date, there is no direct evidence of circadian clock dysregulation in the brains of patients who have MDD. Circadian rhythmicity of gene expression has been observed in animals and peripheral human tissues, but its presence and variability in the human brain were difficult to characterize. Here, we applied time-of-death analysis to gene expression data from high-quality postmortem brains, examining 24-h cyclic patterns in six cortical and limbic regions of 55 subjects with no history of psychiatric or neurological illnesses ("controls") and 34 patients with MDD. Our dataset covered ~12,000 transcripts in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum. Several hundred transcripts in each region showed 24-h cyclic patterns in controls, and >100 transcripts exhibited consistent rhythmicity and phase synchrony across regions. Among the top-ranked rhythmic genes were the canonical clock genes BMAL1(ARNTL), PER1-2-3, NR1D1(REV-ERBa), DBP, BHLHE40 (DEC1), and BHLHE41(DEC2). The phasing of known circadian genes was consistent with data derived from other diurnal mammals. Cyclic patterns were much weaker in the brains of patients with MDD due to shifted peak timing and potentially disrupted phase relationships between individual circadian genes. This transcriptome-wide analysis of the human brain demonstrates a rhythmic rise and fall of gene expression in regions outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in control subjects. The description of its breakdown in MDD suggests potentially important molecular targets for treatment of mood disorders.
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Increased CNV-region deletions in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimers disease (AD) subjects in the ADNI sample.
Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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We investigated the genome-wide distribution of CNVs in the Alzheimers disease (AD) Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) sample (146 with AD, 313 with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and 181 controls). Comparison of single CNVs between cases (MCI and AD) and controls shows overrepresentation of large heterozygous deletions in cases (p-value<0.0001). The analysis of CNV-Regions identifies 44 copy number variable loci of heterozygous deletions, with more CNV-Regions among affected than controls (p=0.005). Seven of the 44 CNV-Regions are nominally significant for association with cognitive impairment. We validated and confirmed our main findings with genome re-sequencing of selected patients and controls. The functional pathway analysis of the genes putatively affected by deletions of CNV-Regions reveals enrichment of genes implicated in axonal guidance, cell-cell adhesion, neuronal morphogenesis and differentiation. Our findings support the role of CNVs in AD, and suggest an association between large deletions and the development of cognitive impairment.
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Analysis of miR-137 expression and rs1625579 in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that act as potent regulators of gene expression. A recent GWAS reported the rs1625579 SNP, located downstream of miR-137, as the strongest new association with schizophrenia [Ripke S, Sanders AR, Kendler KS, Levinson DF, Sklar P, Holmans PA, et al. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci. Nat Genet 2011;43:969-76.]. Prior to this GWAS finding, a schizophrenia imaging-genetic study found miR-137 target genes significantly enriched for association with activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) [Potkin SG, Macciardi F, Guffanti G, Fallon JH, Wang Q, Turner JA, et al. Identifying gene regulatory networks in schizophrenia. Neuroimage 2010;53:839-47.]. We investigated the expression levels of miR-137 and three candidate target genes (ZNF804A, CACNA1C, TCF4) in the DLPFC of postmortem brain tissue from 2 independent cohorts: (1) 26 subjects (10 control (CTR), 7 schizophrenia (SZ), 9 bipolar disorder (BD)) collected at the UCI brain bank; and (2) 99 subjects (33 CTR, 35 SZ, 31 BD) obtained from the Stanley Medical Research Institute (SMRI). MiR-137 expression in the DLPFC did not differ between diagnoses. We also explored the relationship between rs1625579 genotypes and miR-137 expression. Significantly lower miR-137 expression levels were observed in the homozygous TT subjects compared to TG and GG subjects in the control group (30% decrease, p-value = 0.03). Moreover, reduced miR-137 levels in TT subjects corresponded to increased levels of the miR-137 target gene TCF4. The miR-137 expression pattern in 9 brain regions was significant for regional effect (ANOVA p-value = 1.83E-12), with amygdala and hippocampus having the highest miR-137 expression level. In conclusion, decreased miR-137 expression is associated with the SZ risk allele of rs1625579, and potential regulation of TCF4, another SZ candidate gene. This study offers additional support for involvement of miR-137 and downstream targets as mechanisms of risk for psychiatric disorders.
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Coding and noncoding gene expression biomarkers in mood disorders and schizophrenia.
Dis. Markers
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Mood disorders and schizophrenia are common and complex disorders with consistent evidence of genetic and environmental influences on predisposition. It is generally believed that the consequences of disease, gene expression, and allelic heterogeneity may be partly the explanation for the variability observed in treatment response. Correspondingly, while effective treatments are available for some patients, approximately half of the patients fail to respond to current neuropsychiatric treatments. A number of peripheral gene expression studies have been conducted to understand these brain-based disorders and mechanisms of treatment response with the aim of identifying suitable biomarkers and perhaps subgroups of patients based upon molecular fingerprint. In this review, we summarize the results from blood-derived gene expression studies implemented with the aim of discovering biomarkers for treatment response and classification of disorders. We include data from a biomarker study conducted in first-episode subjects with schizophrenia, where the results provide insight into possible individual biological differences that predict antipsychotic response. It is concluded that, while peripheral studies of expression are generating valuable results in pathways involving immune regulation and response, larger studies are required which hopefully will lead to robust biomarkers for treatment response and perhaps underlying variations relevant to these complex disorders.
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Peripheral Biomarkers Revisited: Integrative Profiling of Peripheral Samples for Psychiatric Research.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Peripheral samples, such as blood and skin, have been used for decades in psychiatric research as surrogates for central nervous system samples. Although the validity of the data obtained from peripheral samples has been questioned and other state-of-the-art techniques, such as human brain imaging, genomics, and induced pluripotent stem cells, seem to reduce the value of peripheral cells, accumulating evidence has suggested that revisiting peripheral samples is worthwhile. Here, we re-evaluate the utility of peripheral samples and argue that establishing an understanding of the common signaling and biological processes in the brain and peripheral samples is required for the validity of such models. First, we present an overview of the available types of peripheral cells and describe their advantages and disadvantages. We then briefly summarize the main achievements of omics studies, including epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses, as well as the main findings of functional cellular assays, the results of which imply that alterations in neurotransmission, metabolism, the cell cycle, and the immune system may be partially responsible for the pathophysiology of major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Finally, we discuss the future utility of peripheral samples for the development of biomarkers and tailor-made therapies, such as multimodal assays that are used as a battery of disease and trait pathways and that might be potent and complimentary tools for use in psychiatric research.
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An integrative functional genomics approach for discovering biomarkers in schizophrenia.
Brief Funct Genomics
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2011
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Schizophrenia (SZ) is a complex disorder resulting from both genetic and environmental causes with a lifetime prevalence world-wide of 1%; however, there are no specific, sensitive and validated biomarkers for SZ. A general unifying hypothesis has been put forward that disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genome-wide association study (GWAS) are more likely to be associated with gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). We will describe this hypothesis and review primary methodology with refinements for testing this paradigmatic approach in SZ. We will describe biomarker studies of SZ and testing enrichment of SNPs that are associated both with eQTLs and existing GWAS of SZ. SZ-associated SNPs that overlap with eQTLs can be placed into gene-gene expression, protein-protein and protein-DNA interaction networks. Further, those networks can be tested by reducing/silencing the gene expression levels of critical nodes. We present pilot data to support these methods of investigation such as the use of eQTLs to annotate GWASs of SZ, which could be applied to the field of biomarker discovery. Those networks that have association with SNP markers, especially cis-regulated expression, might lead to a more clear understanding of important candidate genes that predispose to disease and alter expression. This method has general application to many complex disorders.
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Ketamine influences CLOCK:BMAL1 function leading to altered circadian gene expression.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2011
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Major mood disorders have been linked to abnormalities in circadian rhythms, leading to disturbances in sleep, mood, temperature, and hormonal levels. We provide evidence that ketamine, a drug with rapid antidepressant effects, influences the function of the circadian molecular machinery. Ketamine modulates CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation when these regulators are ectopically expressed in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Inhibition occurs in a dose-dependent manner and is attenuated after treatment with the GSK3? antagonist SB21673. We analyzed the effect of ketamine on circadian gene expression and observed a dose-dependent reduction in the amplitude of circadian transcription of the Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 genes. Finally, chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ketamine altered the recruitment of the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex on circadian promoters in a time-dependent manner. Our results reveal a yet unsuspected molecular mode of action of ketamine and thereby may suggest possible pharmacological antidepressant strategies.
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Loss of nuclear factor E2-related factor 1 in the brain leads to dysregulation of proteasome gene expression and neurodegeneration.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2011
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The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, but mechanisms controlling expression of components in this pathway remain poorly understood. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 1 (Nrf1) transcription factor has been shown to regulate expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes. To determine the function of Nrf1 in the brain, mice with a late-stage deletion of Nrf1 in neuronal cells were generated. Loss of Nrf1 leads to impaired proteasome function and neurodegeneration. Gene expression profiling and RT-PCR analysis revealed a coordinate down-regulation of various proteasomal genes including PsmB6, which encodes a catalytic subunit of the proteasome. Transcriptional analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PsmB6 is an Nrf1 target gene. These findings reveal Nrf1 as a key transcriptional regulator required for the expression of proteasomal genes in neurons and suggest that perturbations of Nrf1 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Lack of association to a NRG1 missense polymorphism in schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in a Costa Rican population.
Schizophr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2011
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A missense polymorphism in the NRG1 gene, Val>Leu in exon 11, was reported to increase the risk of schizophrenia in selected families from the Central Valley region of Costa Rica (CVCR). The present study investigated the relationship between three NRG1 genetic variants, rs6994992, rs3924999, and Val>Leu missense polymorphism in exon 11, in cases and selected controls from an isolated population from the CVCR. Isolated populations can have less genetic heterogeneity and increase power to detect risk variants in candidate genes. Subjects with bipolar disorder (BD, n=358), schizophrenia (SZ, n=273), or unrelated controls (CO, n=479) were genotyped for three NRG1 variants. The NRG1 promoter polymorphism (rs6994992) was related to altered expression of NRG1 Type IV in other studies. The expression of NRG1 type IV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the effect of the rs6994992 genotype on expression were explored in a postmortem cohort of BD, SZ, major depressive disorder (MDD) cases, and controls. The missense polymorphism Val>Leu in exon 11 was not significantly associated with schizophrenia as previously reported in a family sample from this population, the minor allele frequency is 4%, thus our sample size is not large enough to detect an association. We observed however an association of rs6994992 with NRG1 type IV expression in DLPFC and a significantly decreased expression in MDD compared to controls. The present results while negative do not rule out a genetic association of these SNPs with BD and SZ in CVCR, perhaps due to small risk effects that we were unable to detect and potential intergenic epistasis. The previous genetic relationship between expression of a putative brain-specific isoform of NRG1 type IV and SNP variation was replicated in postmortem samples in our preliminary study.
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The first decade and beyond of transcriptional profiling in schizophrenia.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2011
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Gene expression changes in brains of individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) have been hypothesized to reflect possible pathways related to pathophysiology and/or medication. Other factors having robust effects on gene expression profiling in brain and possibly influence the schizophrenia transcriptome such as age and pH are examined. Pathways of curated gene expression or gene correlation networks reported in SZ (white matter, apoptosis, neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, immune and stress-response, mitochondrial, and neurodevelopment) are not unique to SZ and have been associated with other psychiatric disorders. Suggestions going forward to improve the next decade of profiling: consider multiple brain regions that are carefully dissected, release large datasets from multiple brain regions in controls to better understand neurocircuitry, integrate genetics and gene expression, measure expression variants on genome wide level, peripheral biomarker studies, and analyze the transcriptome across a developmental series of brains. Gene expression, while an important feature of the genomic landscape, requires further systems biology to advance from control brains to a more precise definition of the schizophrenia interactome.
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Identifying gene regulatory networks in schizophrenia.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2010
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The imaging genetics approach to studying the genetic basis of disease leverages the individual strengths of both neuroimaging and genetic studies by visualizing and quantifying the brain activation patterns in the context of genetic background. Brain imaging as an intermediate phenotype can help clarify the functional link among genes, the molecular networks in which they participate, and brain circuitry and function. Integrating genetic data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with brain imaging as a quantitative trait (QT) phenotype can increase the statistical power to identify risk genes. A QT analysis using brain imaging (DLPFC activation during a working memory task) as a quantitative trait has identified unanticipated risk genes for schizophrenia. Several of these genes (RSRC1, ARHGAP18, ROBO1-ROBO2, GPC1, TNIK, and CTXN3-SLC12A2) have functions related to progenitor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, axonal connectivity, and development of forebrain structures. These genes, however, do not function in isolation but rather through gene regulatory networks. To obtain a deeper understanding how the GWAS-identified genes participate in larger gene regulatory networks, we measured correlations among transcript levels in the mouse and human postmortem tissue and performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that identified several microRNA associated with schizophrenia (448, 218, 137). The results of such computational approaches can be further validated in animal experiments in which the networks are experimentally studied and perturbed with specific compounds. Glypican 1 and FGF17 mouse models for example, can be used to study such gene regulatory networks. The model demonstrates epistatic interactions between FGF and glypican on brain development and may be a useful model of negative symptom schizophrenia.
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Analysis of whole genome biomarker expression in blood and brain.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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The consistency of peripheral gene expression data and the overlap with brain expression has not been evaluated in biomarker discovery, nor has it been reported in multiple tissues from the same subjects on a genome wide transcript level. The effects of processing whole blood, transformation, and passaged cell lines on gene expression profiling was studied in healthy subjects using Affymetrix arrays. Ficoll extracted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes, passaged lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs), and whole blood from Tempus tubes were compared. There were 6,813 transcripts differentially expressed between different methods of blood preparation. Principal component analysis resolved two partitions involving pre- and post-transformation EBV effects. Combining results from Affymetrix arrays, postmortem subjects brain and PBMC profiles showed co-expression levels of summarized transcripts for 4,103 of 17,859 (22.9%) RefSeq transcripts. In a control experiment, rat hemi-brain and blood showed similar expression levels for 19% of RefSeq transcripts. After filtering transcripts that were not significantly different in abundance between human cerebellum and PBMCs from the Affymetrix exon array the correlation in mean transcript abundance was high as expected (r = 0.98). Differences in the alternative splicing index in brain and blood were found for about 90% of all transcripts examined. This study demonstrates over 4,100 brain transcripts co-expressed in blood samples can be further examined by in vitro and in vivo experimental studies of blood and cell lines from patients with psychiatric disorders.
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CRY2 is associated with depression.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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Abnormalities in the circadian clockwork often characterize patients with major depressive and bipolar disorders. Circadian clock genes are targets of interest in these patients. CRY2 is a circadian gene that participates in regulation of the evening oscillator. This is of interest in mood disorders where a lack of switch from evening to morning oscillators has been postulated.
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Exon expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from subjects with schizophrenia before and after glucose deprivation.
BMC Med Genomics
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2009
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The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of glucose reduction stress on lymphoblastic cell line (LCL) gene expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to non-psychotic relatives.
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Global brain gene expression analysis links glutamatergic and GABAergic alterations to suicide and major depression.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2009
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Most studies investigating the neurobiology of depression and suicide have focused on the serotonergic system. While it seems clear that serotonergic alterations play a role in the pathogenesis of these major public health problems, dysfunction in additional neurotransmitter systems and other molecular alterations may also be implicated. Microarray expression studies are excellent screening tools to generate hypotheses about additional molecular processes that may be at play. In this study we investigated brain regions that are known to be implicated in the neurobiology of suicide and major depression are likely to represent valid global molecular alterations.
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Target identification for CNS diseases by transcriptional profiling.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimers disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to tau, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinsons disease (PD) include the ubiquitin-proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14-3-3 protein members, implicating these chaperone proteins and the neurotransmitter pathways they support as possible drug targets. Brains from persons with major depressive disorder reveal decreased expression for genes in glutamate transport and metabolism, neurotrophic signaling (eg, FGF, BDNF and VGF), and MAP kinase pathways. Increases in these pathways in the brains of animals exposed to electroconvulsive shock and antidepressant treatments identify neurotrophic and angiogenic growth factors and second messenger stimulation as therapeutic approaches for the treatment of depression.
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Mitochondrial variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2009
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Mitochondria provide most of the energy for brain cells by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial abnormalities and deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD) in transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. Several mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence have been reported in SZ and BD patients.
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Neuropsychological performance as endophenotypes in extended schizophrenia families from the Central Valley of Costa Rica.
Psychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2009
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The understanding of complex heritable psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia could be clarified by examining endophenotypes within genetically isolated populations, such as the one found in the Central Valley of Costa Rica. The reduction of familial variability within a sample could allow the relationship between the cognitive and symptomatic manifestations of the illness and the genetic underpinnings to become more observable. This study investigates the neuropsychological test performances of 41 family members from four extended multiplex families within the Spanish origin population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica as potential endophenotypes for genetic studies.
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Next Generation Sequence Analysis and Computational Genomics Using Graphical Pipeline Workflows.
Genes (Basel)
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Whole-genome and exome sequencing have already proven to be essential and powerful methods to identify genes responsible for simple Mendelian inherited disorders. These methods can be applied to complex disorders as well, and have been adopted as one of the current mainstream approaches in population genetics. These achievements have been made possible by next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, which require substantial bioinformatics resources to analyze the dense and complex sequence data. The huge analytical burden of data from genome sequencing might be seen as a bottleneck slowing the publication of NGS papers at this time, especially in psychiatric genetics. We review the existing methods for processing NGS data, to place into context the rationale for the design of a computational resource. We describe our method, the Graphical Pipeline for Computational Genomics (GPCG), to perform the computational steps required to analyze NGS data. The GPCG implements flexible workflows for basic sequence alignment, sequence data quality control, single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, copy number variant identification, annotation, and visualization of results. These workflows cover all the analytical steps required for NGS data, from processing the raw reads to variant calling and annotation. The current version of the pipeline is freely available at http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu. These applications of NGS analysis may gain clinical utility in the near future (e.g., identifying miRNA signatures in diseases) when the bioinformatics approach is made feasible. Taken together, the annotation tools and strategies that have been developed to retrieve information and test hypotheses about the functional role of variants present in the human genome will help to pinpoint the genetic risk factors for psychiatric disorders.
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An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain transcriptome.
Nature
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Neuroanatomically precise, genome-wide maps of transcript distributions are critical resources to complement genomic sequence data and to correlate functional and genetic brain architecture. Here we describe the generation and analysis of a transcriptional atlas of the adult human brain, comprising extensive histological analysis and comprehensive microarray profiling of ?900 neuroanatomically precise subdivisions in two individuals. Transcriptional regulation varies enormously by anatomical location, with different regions and their constituent cell types displaying robust molecular signatures that are highly conserved between individuals. Analysis of differential gene expression and gene co-expression relationships demonstrates that brain-wide variation strongly reflects the distributions of major cell classes such as neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. Local neighbourhood relationships between fine anatomical subdivisions are associated with discrete neuronal subtypes and genes involved with synaptic transmission. The neocortex displays a relatively homogeneous transcriptional pattern, but with distinct features associated selectively with primary sensorimotor cortices and with enriched frontal lobe expression. Notably, the spatial topography of the neocortex is strongly reflected in its molecular topography-the closer two cortical regions, the more similar their transcriptomes. This freely accessible online data resource forms a high-resolution transcriptional baseline for neurogenetic studies of normal and abnormal human brain function.
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P2RX7: expression responds to sleep deprivation and associates with rapid cycling in bipolar disorder type 1.
PLoS ONE
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Rapid cycling is a severe form of bipolar disorder with an increased rate of episodes that is particularly treatment-responsive to chronotherapy and stable sleep-wake cycles. We hypothesized that the P2RX7 gene would be affected by sleep deprivation and be implicated in rapid cycling.
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Mitochondrial mutations and polymorphisms in psychiatric disorders.
Front Genet
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Mitochondrial deficiencies with unknown causes have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) in imaging and postmortem studies. Polymorphisms and somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated as potential causes with next generation sequencing of mtDNA (mtDNA-Seq) and genotyping arrays in subjects with SZ, BD, major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The common deletion of 4,977?bp in mtDNA was compared between SZ and controls in 11 different vulnerable brain regions and in blood samples, and in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of BD, SZ, and controls. In a separate analysis, association of mitochondria SNPs (mtSNPs) with SZ and BD in European ancestry individuals (n?=?6,040) was tested using Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2) datasets. The common deletion levels were highly variable across brain regions, with a 40-fold increase in some regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and amygdala), increased with age, and showed little change in blood samples from the same subjects. The common deletion levels were increased in the DLPFC for BD compared to controls, but not in SZ. Full mtDNA genome resequencing of 23 subjects, showed seven novel homoplasmic mutations, five were novel synonymous coding mutations. By logistic regression analysis there were no significant mtSNPs associated with BD or SZ after genome wide correction. However, nominal association of mtSNPs (p?
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Gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and nucleus accumbens of mood disorders subjects that committed suicide.
PLoS ONE
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Suicidal behaviors are frequent in mood disorders patients but only a subset of them ever complete suicide. Understanding predisposing factors for suicidal behaviors in high risk populations is of major importance for the prevention and treatment of suicidal behaviors. The objective of this project was to investigate gene expression changes associated with suicide in brains of mood disorder patients by microarrays (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus2.0) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC: 6 Non-suicides, 15 suicides), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 6NS, 9S) and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc: 8NS, 13S). ANCOVA was used to control for age, gender, pH and RNA degradation, with P ? 0.01 and fold change ± 1.25 as criteria for significance. Pathway analysis revealed serotonergic signaling alterations in the DLPFC and glucocorticoid signaling alterations in the ACC and NAcc. The gene with the lowest p-value in the DLPFC was the 5-HT2A gene, previously associated both with suicide and mood disorders. In the ACC 6 metallothionein genes were down-regulated in suicide (MT1E, MT1F, MT1G, MT1H, MT1X, MT2A) and three were down-regulated in the NAcc (MT1F, MT1G, MT1H). Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qPCR, we confirmed the 5-HT2A alterations and the global down-regulation of members of the metallothionein subfamilies MT 1 and 2 in suicide completers. MTs 1 and 2 are neuro-protective following stress and glucocorticoid stimulations, suggesting that in suicide victims neuroprotective response to stress and cortisol may be diminished. Our results thus suggest that suicide-specific expression changes in mood disorders involve both glucocorticoids regulated metallothioneins and serotonergic signaling in different regions of the brain.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.