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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Vagus nerve stimulation for drug-resistant epilepsy: A European long-term study up to 24 months in 347 children.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2014
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To gain insight into the long-term impact of vagus nerve stimulation (with VNS Therapy) in children with drug-resistant epilepsy, we conducted the largest retrospective multicenter study to date over an extended follow-up period of up to 24 months.
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16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2014
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Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 previously associated with neurodevelopmental disorders also increase risk of RE. Our association analyses revealed a significant excess of the 600 kb genomic duplication at the 16p11.2 locus (chr16: 29.5-30.1 Mb) in 393 unrelated patients with typical (n = 339) and atypical (ARE; n = 54) RE compared with the prevalence in 65 046 European population controls (5/393 cases versus 32/65 046 controls; Fisher's exact test P = 2.83 × 10(-6), odds ratio = 26.2, 95% confidence interval: 7.9-68.2). In contrast, the 16p11.2 duplication was not detected in 1738 European epilepsy patients with either temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 330) and genetic generalized epilepsies (n = 1408), suggesting a selective enrichment of the 16p11.2 duplication in idiopathic focal childhood epilepsies (Fisher's exact test P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). In a subsequent screen among children carrying the 16p11.2 600 kb rearrangement we identified three patients with RE-spectrum epilepsies in 117 duplication carriers (2.6%) but none in 202 carriers of the reciprocal deletion. Our results suggest that the 16p11.2 duplication represents a significant genetic risk factor for typical and atypical RE.
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Epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development-Outcome and impact of the new ILAE classification on focal cortical dysplasia.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2014
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To determine long-term efficacy and safety of epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development (MCD) and to identify differences in seizure outcome of the various MCD subgroups. Special focus was set on the newly introduced International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD).
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Analysis of ELP4, SRPX2, and interacting genes in typical and atypical rolandic epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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Rolandic epilepsy (RE) and its atypical variants (atypical rolandic epilepsy, ARE) along the spectrum of epilepsy-aphasia disorders are characterized by a strong but largely unknown genetic basis. Two genes with a putative (ELP4) or a proven (SRPX2) function in neuronal migration were postulated to confer susceptibility to parts of the disease spectrum: the ELP4 gene to centrotemporal spikes and SRPX2 to ARE. To reexamine these findings, we investigated a cohort of 280 patients of European ancestry with RE/ARE for the etiological contribution of these genes and their close interaction partners. We performed next-generation sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array based genotyping to screen for sequence and structural variants. In comparison to European controls we could not detect an enrichment of rare deleterious variants of ELP4, SRPX2, or their interaction partners in affected individuals. The previously described functional p.N327S variant in the X chromosomal SRPX2 gene was detected in two affected individuals (0.81%) and also in controls (0.26%), with some preponderance of male patients. We did not detect an association of SNPs in the ELP4 gene with centrotemporal spikes as previously reported. In conclusion our data do not support a major role of ELP4 and SRPX2 in the etiology of RE/ARE.
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Time-variant, frequency-selective, linear and nonlinear analysis of heart rate variability in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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The major aim of our study is to demonstrate that a concerted combination of time-variant, frequency-selective, linear and nonlinear analysis approaches can be beneficially used for the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in epileptic patients to reveal premonitory information regarding an imminent seizure and to provide more information on the mechanisms leading to changes of the autonomic nervous system. The quest is to demonstrate that the combined approach gains new insights into specific short-term patterns in HRV during preictal, ictal, and postictal periods in epileptic children. The continuous Morlet-wavelet transform was used to explore the time-frequency characteristics of the HRV using spectrogram, phase-locking, band-power and quadratic phase coupling analyses. These results are completed by time-variant characteristics derived from a signal-adaptive approach. Advanced empirical mode decomposition was utilized to separate out certain HRV components, in particular blood-pressure-related Mayer waves (?0.1 Hz) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (?0.3 Hz). Their time-variant nonlinear predictability was analyzed using local estimations of the largest Lyapunov exponent (point prediction error). Approximately 80-100 s before the seizure onset timing and coordination of both HRV components can be observed. A higher degree of synchronization is found and with it a higher predictability of the HRV. All investigated linear and nonlinear analyses contribute with a specific importance to these results.
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Synchronization analysis between heart rate variability and EEG activity before, during, and after epileptic seizure.
Biomed Tech (Berl)
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Abstract An innovative concept for synchronization analysis between heart rate (HR) components and rhythms in EEG envelopes is represented; it applies time-variant analyses to heart rate variability (HRV) and EEG, and it was tested in children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). After a removal of ocular and movement-related artifacts, EEG band activity was computed by means of the frequency-selective Hilbert transform providing envelopes of frequency bands. Synchronization between HRV and EEG envelopes was quantified by Morlet wavelet coherence. A surrogate data approach was adapted to test for statistical significance of time-variant coherences. Using this processing scheme, significant coherence values between a HRV low-frequency sub-band (0.08-0.12 Hz) and the EEG ? envelope (1.5-4 Hz) occurring both in the preictal and early postictal periods of a seizure can be shown. Investigations were performed for all electrodes at 20-s intervals and for selected electrode pairs (T3÷C3, T4÷C4) in a time-variant mode. Synchronization was more pronounced in the group of right hemispheric TLE patients than in the left hemispheric group. Such a group-specific augmentation of synchronization confirms the hypothesis of a right hemispheric lateralization of sympathetic cardiac control of the low-frequency HRV components.
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DEPDC5 mutations in genetic focal epilepsies of childhood.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Recent studies reported DEPDC5 loss-of-function mutations in different focal epilepsy syndromes. Here we identified 1 predicted truncation and 2 missense mutations in 3 children with rolandic epilepsy (3 of 207). In addition, we identified 3 families with unclassified focal childhood epilepsies carrying predicted truncating DEPDC5 mutations (3 of 82). The detected variants were all novel, inherited, and present in all tested affected (n=11) and in 7 unaffected family members, indicating low penetrance. Our findings extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in DEPDC5 and suggest that rolandic epilepsy, albeit rarely, and other nonlesional childhood epilepsies are among the associated syndromes.
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Vertical perithalamic hemispherotomy: a single-center experience in 40 pediatric patients with epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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The current concept for hemispherotomy includes various lateral techniques and the vertical perithalamic hemispherotomy introduced by Delalande in 1992. We have chosen the vertical approach because of advantages that possibly influence outcome: the possibility to completely disconnect the hemisphere at the level of the thalamus obviating both the need to resect the insula and the need to open and dissect the subarachnoid space of the Sylvian fissure.
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Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS). The genetic basis is largely unknown. We detected new heterozygous mutations in GRIN2A in 27 of 359 affected individuals from 2 independent cohorts with IFE (7.5%; P = 4.83 × 10(-18), Fishers exact test). Mutations occurred significantly more frequently in the more severe phenotypes, with mutation detection rates ranging from 12/245 (4.9%) in individuals with BECTS to 9/51 (17.6%) in individuals with CSWS (P = 0.009, Cochran-Armitage test for trend). In addition, exon-disrupting microdeletions were found in 3 of 286 individuals (1.0%; P = 0.004, Fishers exact test). These results establish alterations of the gene encoding the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit as a major genetic risk factor for IFE.
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Consensus on diagnosis and management of JME: From founders observations to current trends.
Epilepsy Behav
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2013
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An international workshop on juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) was conducted in Avignon, France in May 2011. During that workshop, a group of 45 experts on JME, together with one of the founding fathers of the syndrome of JME ("Janz syndrome"), Prof. Dr. Dieter Janz from Berlin, reached a consensus on diagnostic criteria and management of JME. The international experts on JME proposed two sets of criteria, which will be helpful for both clinical and scientific purposes. Class I criteria encompass myoclonic jerks without loss of consciousness exclusively occurring on or after awakening and associated with typical generalized epileptiform EEG abnormalities, with an age of onset between 10 and 25. Class II criteria allow the inclusion of myoclonic jerks predominantly occurring after awakening, generalized epileptiform EEG abnormalities with or without concomitant myoclonic jerks, and a greater time window for age at onset (6-25years). For both sets of criteria, patients should have a clear history of myoclonic jerks predominantly occurring after awakening and an EEG with generalized epileptiform discharges supporting a diagnosis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Patients with JME require special management because their epilepsy starts in the vulnerable period of adolescence and, accordingly, they have lifestyle issues that typically increase the likelihood of seizures (sleep deprivation, exposure to stroboscopic flashes in discos, alcohol intake, etc.) with poor adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Results of an inventory of the different clinical management strategies are given. This article is part of a supplemental special issue entitled Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy: What is it Really?
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Disconnective surgery in posterior quadrantic epilepsy: experience in a consecutive series of 10 patients.
Neurosurg Focus
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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Outcomes following functional hemispherotomy in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy have been well described. However, studies reporting long-term longitudinal outcomes after subhemispheric disconnective epilepsy surgery are still limited.
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Midbrain-hindbrain malformations in patients with malformations of cortical development and epilepsy: a series of 220 patients.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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Midbrain-hindbrain malformations (MHM) may coexist with malformations of cortical development (MCD). This study represents a first attempt to investigate the spectrum of MHM in a large series of patients with MCD and epilepsy. We aimed to explore specific associations between MCD and MHM and to compare two groups of patients: MCD with MHM (wMHM) and MCD without MHM (w/oMHM) with regard to clinical and imaging features. Two hundred and twenty patients (116 women/104 men, median age 28 years, interquartile range 20-44 years at the time of assessment) with MCD and epilepsy were identified at the Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. All underwent high-resolution MRIs (1.5-T) between 01.01.2002 and 31.12.2011. Midbrain-hindbrain structures were visually assessed by three independent raters. MHM were seen in 17% (38/220) of patients. The rate of patients wMHM and w/oMHM differed significantly (p=0.004) in three categories of MCD (category I - to abnormal neuronal proliferation; category II - to abnormal neuronal migration; and category III - due to abnormal neuronal late migration/organization): MCD due to abnormal neuronal migration (31%) and organization (23%) were more commonly associated with MHM compared to those with MCD due to abnormal neuronal proliferation (9%). Extensive bilateral MCD were seen more often in patients wMHM compared to those w/oMHM (63% vs. 36%; p=0.004). In wMHM group compared to w/oMHM group there were higher rates of callosal dysgenesis (26% vs. 4%; p<0.001) and hippocampal abnormalities (52% vs. 27%; p<0.001). Patients wMHM were younger (median 25 years vs. 30 years; p=0.010) at the time of assessment and had seizure onset at an earlier age (median 5 years vs. 12 years; p=0.043) compared to those w/oMHM. Patients wMHM had higher rates of learning disability (71% vs. 38%; p<0.001), delayed developmental milestones (68% vs. 35%; p<0.001) and neurological deficits (66% vs. 47%; p=0.049) compared to those w/oMHM. The groups (wMHM and w/oMHM) did not differ in their response to antiepileptic treatment, seizure outcome, seizure types, EEG abnormalities and rate of status epilepticus. Presence of MHM in patients with MCD and epilepsy is associated with severe morphological and clinical phenotypes.
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Neuropsychology and behavior in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.
Epilepsy Behav
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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Following decades of neglect, there has been an increasing interest in the behavioral aspects of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) in the recent literature. A number of authors have investigated psychiatric comorbidity, cognitive profiles, and related behavioral features associated with JME. Although these findings are not entirely uniform, most studies suggest an increased incidence in psychiatric comorbidity and specific cognitive deficits that explain some of the clinical observations of poor compliance and other unhealthy behaviors in people suffering from JME. Neuropsychological profiles in JME are suggestive of subtle frontal dysfunctions, and some of the observations have been linked with sophisticated structural and functional imaging findings. Taken together, there is evidence that JME is associated with dysfunctions in networks linking motor and cognitive neuronal centers. Interestingly, there is evidence from family studies that the behavioral abnormalities in JME are genetically determined, suggesting an underlying developmental disorder.
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Neuropathologic measurements in focal cortical dysplasias: validation of the ILAE 2011 classification system and diagnostic implications for MRI.
Acta Neuropathol.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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Focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) which represent a composite group of cortical malformations are increasingly recognized as morphological substrate for severe therapy-refractory epilepsy in children and young adults. However, presurgical evaluation remains challenging as not all FCD variants can be reliably detected by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we studied a cohort of 52 epilepsy patients with neuropathological evidence for FCD using the 2011 classification of the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE) and systematically analysed those histopathologic features applicable also for MRI diagnostics. Histopathologic parameters included quantitative measurements of cellular profiles, cortical thickness, heterotopic neurons in white matter, and myelination that were compared between FCD subtypes and age-/localization-matched controls (n = 36) using multivariate analysis. Dysmorphic neurons in both FCD Type II variants showed significantly increased diameter of their cell bodies and nuclei. Cortical thickness was also increased with a distinct loss of myelin content specifying FCD Type IIb from IIa. The data further suggested that myelination deficits in FCD Type IIb result from compromised oligodendroglial lineage differentiation and we concluded that the "transmantle sign" is a unique finding in FCD Type IIb. In contrast, FCD Type Ia was characterized by a smaller cortical ribbon and higher neuronal densities, but these parameters failed to reach statistical significance (considering age- and location-dependent variability in controls). All FCD variants showed abnormal grey-white matter boundaries with increased numbers of heterotopic neurons. Similar results were obtained also at deep white matter location. Thus, many FCD variants may indeed escape visual MRI inspection, but suspicious areas with increased or decreased cortical thickness as well as grey-white matter blurring may be uncovered using post-processing protocols of neuroimaging data. The systematic analysis of well-specified histopathological features could be helpful to improve sensitivity and specificity in MRI detection during pre-surgical work-up of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies.
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Glutamate decarboxylase 67 is expressed in hippocampal mossy fibers of temporal lobe epilepsy patients.
Hippocampus
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Recently, expression of glutamate decarboxylase-67 (GAD67), a key enzyme of GABA synthesis, was detected in the otherwise glutamatergic mossy fibers of the rat hippocampus. Synthesis of the enzyme was markedly enhanced after experimentally induced status epilepticus. Here, we investigated the expression of GAD67 protein and mRNA in 44 hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using double immunofluorescence histochemistry, immunoblotting, and in situ hybridization. Both in specimens with (n = 37) and without (n = 7) hippocampal sclerosis, GAD67 was highly coexpressed with dynorphin in terminal areas of mossy fibers, including the dentate hilus and the stratum lucidum of sector CA3. In the cases with Ammons horn sclerosis, also the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus contained strong staining for GAD67 immunoreactivity, indicating labeling of mossy fiber terminals that specifically sprout into this area. Double immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of GAD67 immunoreactivity with the mossy fiber marker dynorphin. The extent of colabeling correlated with the number of seizures experienced by the patients. Furthermore, GAD67 mRNA was found in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Levels, both of GAD67 mRNA and of GAD67 immunoreactivity were similar in sclerotic and nonsclerotic specimens and appeared to be increased compared to post mortem controls. Provided that the strong expression of GAD67 results in synthesis of GABA in hippocampal mossy fibers this may represent a self-protecting mechanism in TLE. In addition GAD67 expression also may result in conversion of excessive intracellular glutamate to nontoxic GABA within mossy fiber terminals.
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Adaptive behaviour in Down syndrome: a cross-sectional study from childhood to adulthood.
Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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Adaptive behaviour in Down syndrome is described to increase until middle childhood and to begin to decline in adolescence, whereas significant deterioration in middle adulthood has been attributed to early onset of dementia. Nevertheless, opinions diverge about when the slowing down of adaptive and cognitive abilities starts. Our aims were to describe the profile of adaptive behaviour in Down syndrome, the variability within different age-groups, age-related changes and the correlation to cognitive abilities.
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Type 1 diabetes and epilepsy: efficacy and safety of the ketogenic diet.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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Diabetes type 1 seems to be more prevalent in epilepsy, and low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control in diabetes type 2, but data on the use of the classic ketogenic diet (KD) in epilepsy and diabetes are scarce. We present 15 months of follow-up of a 3 years and 6 months old girl with diabetes type 1 (on the KD), right-sided hemiparesis, and focal epilepsy due to a malformation of cortical development. Although epileptiform activity on electroencephalography (EEG) persisted (especially during sleep), clinically overt seizures have not been reported since the KD. An improved activity level and significant developmental achievements were noticed. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels improved, and glycemic control was excellent, without severe side effects. Our experience indicates that diabetes does not preclude the use of the KD.
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Beneficial effect of epilepsy surgery in a case of childhood non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2010
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This 15-year-old girl had subacute onset of secondary generalized seizures, confusion, and subsequent memory decline. MRI showed bilateral hippocampal swelling progressing to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) within 12 months. Epilepsy surgery was performed, and laboratory data were consistent with non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. 18 months after epilepsy surgery, the patient is seizure-free with stable cognitive functions.
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Recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 and 16p13.11 predispose to idiopathic generalized epilepsies.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2009
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Idiopathic generalized epilepsies account for 30% of all epilepsies. Despite a predominant genetic aetiology, the genetic factors predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsies remain elusive. Studies of structural genomic variations have revealed a significant excess of recurrent microdeletions at 1q21.1, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 in various neuropsychiatric disorders including autism, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. Microdeletions at 15q13.3 have recently been shown to constitute a strong genetic risk factor for common idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndromes, implicating that other recurrent microdeletions may also be involved in epileptogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the impact of five microdeletions at the genomic hotspot regions 1q21.1, 15q11.2, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 on the genetic risk to common idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndromes. The candidate microdeletions were assessed by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays in 1234 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy from North-western Europe and 3022 controls from the German population. Microdeletions were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and their breakpoints refined by array comparative genomic hybridization. In total, 22 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (1.8%) carried one of the five novel microdeletions compared with nine controls (0.3%) (odds ratio = 6.1; 95% confidence interval 2.8-13.2; chi(2) = 26.7; 1 degree of freedom; P = 2.4 x 10(-7)). Microdeletions were observed at 1q21.1 [Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE)/control: 1/1], 15q11.2 (IGE/control: 12/6), 16p11.2 IGE/control: 1/0, 16p13.11 (IGE/control: 6/2) and 22q11.2 (IGE/control: 2/0). Significant associations with IGEs were found for the microdeletions at 15q11.2 (odds ratio = 4.9; 95% confidence interval 1.8-13.2; P = 4.2 x 10(-4)) and 16p13.11 (odds ratio = 7.4; 95% confidence interval 1.3-74.7; P = 0.009). Including nine patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy in this cohort with known 15q13.3 microdeletions (IGE/control: 9/0), parental transmission could be examined in 14 families. While 10 microdeletions were inherited (seven maternal and three paternal transmissions), four microdeletions occurred de novo at 15q13.3 (n = 1), 16p13.11 (n = 2) and 22q11.2 (n = 1). Eight of the transmitting parents were clinically unaffected, suggesting that the microdeletion itself is not sufficient to cause the epilepsy phenotype. Although the microdeletions investigated are individually rare (<1%) in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, they collectively seem to account for a significant fraction of the genetic variance in common idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndromes. The present results indicate an involvement of microdeletions at 15q11.2 and 16p13.11 in epileptogenesis and strengthen the evidence that recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2, 15q13.3 and 16p13.11 confer a pleiotropic susceptibility effect to a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Sex-specific predictors of criminal recidivism in a representative sample of incarcerated youth.
Compr Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2009
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The objective of the study was to identify sex-specific psychopathologic predictors of criminal recidivism among a representative sample of incarcerated youths.
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Genome wide high density SNP-based linkage analysis of childhood absence epilepsy identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p23-p14.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2009
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Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) characterised by typical absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5-4 Hz spike-wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to the aetiology is well recognised but the mechanism of inheritance and the genes involved are yet to be fully established. A genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based high density linkage scan was carried out using 41 nuclear pedigrees with at least two affected members. Multipoint parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using MERLIN 1.1.1 and a susceptibility locus was identified on chromosome 3p23-p14 (Z(mean)=3.9, p<0.0001; HLOD=3.3, alpha=0.7). The linked region harbours the functional candidate genes TRAK1 and CACNA2D2. Fine-mapping using a tagSNP approach demonstrated disease association with variants in TRAK1.
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Dynamic up-regulation of prodynorphin transcription in temporal lobe epilepsy.
Hippocampus
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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Dynorphin neuropeptides are believed to act as endogenous anticonvulsants, though direct evidence for such a role in humans is sparse. We now report pronounced increases of prodynorphin mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in comparison to controls. We detected a conspicuously right skewed, bimodal distribution of mRNA levels among patients, suggestive of a dynamic up-regulation of prodynorphin expression in epilepsy. Highest transcript levels were seen postictally. Our data argue for an essential role of dynorphin in the termination of seizures.
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Speech and school performance in children with benign partial epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BCECTS).
Seizure
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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To assess prospectively language and speech ability in children with benign partial epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BCECTS). To evaluate academic performance and social competencies both during the active disease and after remission.
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Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: a consensus approach on diagnosis, assessment, management, and trial methodology.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2009
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Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is one of the most severe epileptic encephalopathies of childhood onset. The cause of this syndrome can be symptomatic (ie, secondary to an underlying brain disorder) or cryptogenic (ie, has no known cause). Although Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is commonly characterised by a triad of signs, which include multiple seizure types, slow spike-wave complexes on electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, and impairment of cognitive function, there is debate with regard to the precise limits, cause, and diagnosis of the syndrome. Tonic seizures, which are thought to be a characteristic sign of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, are not present at onset and the EEG features are not pathognomonic of the disorder. There are few effective treatment options for the multiple seizures and comorbidities, and the long-term outlook is poor for most patients. Probably as a result of the complexity of the disorder, only a few randomised trials have studied Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and thus many of the drugs that are more commonly used have little or no supporting evidence base from controlled trials. In this Review, we discuss the main issues with regard to the diagnosis and treatment options available. We also suggest key considerations for future trials and highlight the importance of a comprehensive approach to the assessment and management of this syndrome.
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15q13.3 microdeletions increase risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2009
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We identified 15q13.3 microdeletions encompassing the CHRNA7 gene in 12 of 1,223 individuals with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), which were not detected in 3,699 controls (joint P = 5.32 x 10(-8)). Most deletion carriers showed common IGE syndromes without other features previously associated with 15q13.3 microdeletions, such as intellectual disability, autism or schizophrenia. Our results indicate that 15q13.3 microdeletions constitute the most prevalent risk factor for common epilepsies identified to date.
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Genome-wide association analysis of genetic generalized epilepsies implicates susceptibility loci at 1q43, 2p16.1, 2q22.3 and 17q21.32.
, Michael Steffens, Costin Leu, Ann-Kathrin Ruppert, Federico Zara, Pasquale Striano, Angela Robbiano, Giuseppe Capovilla, Paolo Tinuper, Antonio Gambardella, Amedeo Bianchi, Angela la Neve, Giovanni Crichiutti, Carolien G F de Kovel, Dorothée Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Gerrit-Jan de Haan, Dick Lindhout, Verena Gaus, Bettina Schmitz, Dieter Janz, Yvonne G Weber, Felicitas Becker, Holger Lerche, Bernhard J Steinhoff, Ailing A Kleefuss-Lie, Wolfram S Kunz, Rainer Surges, Christian E Elger, Hiltrud Muhle, Sarah von Spiczak, Philipp Ostertag, Ingo Helbig, Ulrich Stephani, Rikke S Møller, Helle Hjalgrim, Leanne M Dibbens, Susannah Bellows, Karen Oliver, Saul Mullen, Ingrid E Scheffer, Samuel F Berkovic, Kate V Everett, Mark R Gardiner, Carla Marini, Renzo Guerrini, Anna-Elina Lehesjoki, Auli Sirén, Michel Guipponi, Alain Malafosse, Pierre Thomas, Rima Nabbout, Stephanie Baulac, Eric Leguern, Rosa Guerrero, José M Serratosa, Philipp S Reif, Felix Rosenow, Martina Mörzinger, Martha Feucht, Fritz Zimprich, Claudia Kapser, Christoph J Schankin, Arvid Suls, Katrin Smets, Peter De Jonghe, Albena Jordanova, Hande Cağlayan, Zuhal Yapici, Destina A Yalcin, Betul Baykan, Nerses Bebek, Ugur Ozbek, Christian Gieger, Heinz-Erich Wichmann, Tobias Balschun, David Ellinghaus, Andre Franke, Christian Meesters, Tim Becker, Thomas F Wienker, Anne Hempelmann, Herbert Schulz, Franz Rüschendorf, Markus Leber, Steffen M Pauck, Holger Trucks, Mohammad R Toliat, Peter Nürnberg, Giuliano Avanzini, Bobby P C Koeleman, Thomas Sander.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% and account for 20-30% of all epilepsies. Despite their high heritability of 80%, the genetic factors predisposing to GGEs remain elusive. To identify susceptibility variants shared across common GGE syndromes, we carried out a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 3020 patients with GGEs and 3954 controls of European ancestry. To dissect out syndrome-related variants, we also explored two distinct GGE subgroups comprising 1434 patients with genetic absence epilepsies (GAEs) and 1134 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Joint Stage-1 and 2 analyses revealed genome-wide significant associations for GGEs at 2p16.1 (rs13026414, P(meta) = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR[T] = 0.81) and 17q21.32 (rs72823592, P(meta) = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR[A] = 0.77). The search for syndrome-related susceptibility alleles identified significant associations for GAEs at 2q22.3 (rs10496964, P(meta) = 9.1 × 10(-9), OR[T] = 0.68) and at 1q43 for JME (rs12059546, P(meta) = 4.1 × 10(-8), OR[G] = 1.42). Suggestive evidence for an association with GGEs was found in the region 2q24.3 (rs11890028, P(meta) = 4.0 × 10(-6)) nearby the SCN1A gene, which is currently the gene with the largest number of known epilepsy-related mutations. The associated regions harbor high-ranking candidate genes: CHRM3 at 1q43, VRK2 at 2p16.1, ZEB2 at 2q22.3, SCN1A at 2q24.3 and PNPO at 17q21.32. Further replication efforts are necessary to elucidate whether these positional candidate genes contribute to the heritability of the common GGE syndromes.
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Frontal delta power associated with negative symptoms in ultra-high risk individuals who transitioned to psychosis.
Schizophr. Res.
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It has recently been shown that treatment with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) could decrease the rate of transition to psychosis, and improve psychiatric symptoms and global functioning in people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Previous studies have suggested that resting state brain activity measured with electroencephalography (EEG) may represent an objective biomarker of changes in neural function associated with supplementation with omega-3 PUFAs. It has also been proposed that although resting state EEG cannot, by itself, predict transition to psychosis in UHR individuals, the combination of resting state EEG with negative symptoms may be a valid predictor of transition. The present study investigated whether treatment with omega-3 PUFAs influenced resting state EEG in UHR participants, and whether or not the association of the participants resting state EEG with their levels of negative symptoms was dependent on their transition status. The brain activity of 73 UHR participants was recorded in the context of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of supplementation with omega-3 PUFAs. The UHR participants who subsequently transitioned to psychosis (UHR+) did not differ from those who did not transition (UHR-) in terms of resting state EEG power in any frequency band. However, negative symptom scores were associated with increased delta activity in the frontal region of the UHR+ participants, but not in the UHR- participants. Treatment with omega-3 PUFAs did not induce changes in resting state EEG in either group. The results suggest that decreased frontal delta activity, in combination with high levels of negative symptoms, may be a risk factor for subsequent transition to psychosis in UHR individuals.
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Genome-wide linkage meta-analysis identifies susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31.3 for genetic generalized epilepsies.
Epilepsia
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Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% with heritability estimates of 80%. A considerable proportion of families with siblings affected by GGEs presumably display an oligogenic inheritance. The present genome-wide linkage meta-analysis aimed to map: (1) susceptibility loci shared by a broad spectrum of GGEs, and (2) seizure type-related genetic factors preferentially predisposing to either typical absence or myoclonic seizures, respectively.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.