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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Ophthalmic Rosacea: Case Report in a Child and Treatment Recommendations.
Pediatr Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2014
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We report a rare case of rosacea with ocular involvement in a child that remitted with prolonged anti-inflammatory oral tetracycline therapy and provide general expert recommendations. A 14-year-old girl presented with discrete papules and pustules on both cheeks with blepharitis and conjunctivitis. Ophthalmologic examination confirmed bilateral severe blepharitis, as well as a corneal infiltrate in the right eye with additional neovascularization. The diagnosis of rosacea with ocular involvement was made. In addition to the existing antibiotic and anti-inflammatory topical eye therapy, systemic treatment with minocycline 50 mg twice a day was started. After marked improvement, the dose was reduced to 50 mg once a day. After further amelioration, treatment was switched to maintenance therapy with 40 mg of prolonged-release doxycycline. Three years after a 12-month course of anti-inflammatory therapy, the patient remained recurrence free.
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One Small Step for a Yeast - Microevolution within Macrophages Renders Candida glabrata Hypervirulent Due to a Single Point Mutation.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2014
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Candida glabrata is one of the most common causes of candidemia, a life-threatening, systemic fungal infection, and is surpassed in frequency only by Candida albicans. Major factors contributing to the success of this opportunistic pathogen include its ability to readily acquire resistance to antifungals and to colonize and adapt to many different niches in the human body. Here we addressed the flexibility and adaptability of C. glabrata during interaction with macrophages with a serial passage approach. Continuous co-incubation of C. glabrata with a murine macrophage cell line for over six months resulted in a striking alteration in fungal morphology: The growth form changed from typical spherical yeasts to pseudohyphae-like structures - a phenotype which was stable over several generations without any selective pressure. Transmission electron microscopy and FACS analyses showed that the filamentous-like morphology was accompanied by changes in cell wall architecture. This altered growth form permitted faster escape from macrophages and increased damage of macrophages. In addition, the evolved strain (Evo) showed transiently increased virulence in a systemic mouse infection model, which correlated with increased organ-specific fungal burden and inflammatory response (TNF? and IL-6) in the brain. Similarly, the Evo mutant significantly increased TNF? production in the brain on day 2, which is mirrored in macrophages confronted with the Evo mutant, but not with the parental wild type. Whole genome sequencing of the Evo strain, genetic analyses, targeted gene disruption and a reverse microevolution experiment revealed a single nucleotide exchange in the chitin synthase-encoding CHS2 gene as the sole basis for this phenotypic alteration. A targeted CHS2 mutant with the same SNP showed similar phenotypes as the Evo strain under all experimental conditions tested. These results indicate that microevolutionary processes in host-simulative conditions can elicit adaptations of C. glabrata to distinct host niches and even lead to hypervirulent strains.
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Transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells to macrophage-like cells during atherogenesis.
Circ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2014
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Atherosclerosis is a widespread and devastating disease, but the origins of cells within atherosclerotic plaques are not well defined.
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Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides and antibiotics against Clostridium difficile.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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Accelerating rates of health care-associated infections caused by Clostridium difficile, with increasing recurrence and rising antibiotic resistance rates, have become a serious problem in recent years. This study was conducted to explore whether a combination of antibiotics with human antimicrobial peptides may lead to an increase in antibacterial activity. The in vitro activities of the antimicrobial peptides HBD1 to HBD3, HNP1, HD5, and LL-37 and the antibiotics tigecycline, moxifloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem alone or in combination against 10 toxinogenic and 10 nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains were investigated. Bacterial viability was determined by flow cytometry and toxin production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). When combined at subinhibitory concentrations, antimicrobial peptides and antibiotics generally led to an additive killing effect against toxinogenic and nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains. However, LL-37 and HBD3 acted in synergism with all the antibiotics that were tested. Electron microscopy revealed membrane perturbation in bacterial cell walls by HBD3. In 3 out of 10 toxinogenic strains, HBD3, LL-37, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem administration led to an increased toxin release which was not neutralized by the addition of HNP1. Antimicrobial peptides increase the bacterial killing of antibiotics against C. difficile regardless of the antibiotics' mode of action. Membrane perturbation in or pore formation on the bacterial cell wall may enhance the uptake of antibiotics and increase their antibacterial effect. Therefore, a combination of antibiotics with antimicrobial peptides may represent a promising novel approach to the treatment of C. difficile infections.
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Pre-activated blood platelets and a pro-thrombotic phenotype in APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease.
Cell. Signal.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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Platelet activation and thrombus formation play a critical role in primary hemostasis but also represent a pathophysiological mechanism leading to acute thrombotic vascular occlusions. Besides, platelets modulate cellular processes including inflammation, angiogenesis and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, platelet activation and thrombus formation are altered in different diseases leading to either bleeding complications or pathological thrombus formation. For many years platelets have been considered to play a role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by deposits of amyloid-? (A?) and strongly related to vascular diseases with platelets playing a critical role in the progression of AD because exposure of platelets to A? induces platelet activation, platelet A? release, and enhanced platelet adhesion to collagen in vitro and at the injured carotid artery in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms and the relation between vascular pathology and amyloid-? plaque formation in the pathogenesis of AD are not fully understood. Compelling evidence is suggestive for altered platelet activity in AD patients. Thus we analyzed platelet activation and thrombus formation in aged AD transgenic mice (APP23) known to develop amyloid-? deposits in the brain parenchyma and cerebral vessels. As a result, platelets are in a pre-activated state in blood of APP23 mice and showed strongly enhanced integrin activation, degranulation and spreading kinetics on fibrinogen surfaces upon stimulation. This enhanced platelet signaling translated into almost unlimited thrombus formation on collagen under flow conditions in vitro and accelerated vessel occlusion in vivo suggesting that these mice are at high risk of arterial thrombosis leading to cerebrovascular and unexpectedly to cardiovascular complications that might be also relevant in AD patients.
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Fungal chitin dampens inflammation through IL-10 induction mediated by NOD2 and TLR9 activation.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Chitin is an essential structural polysaccharide of fungal pathogens and parasites, but its role in human immune responses remains largely unknown. It is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and its derivatives today are widely used for medical and industrial purposes. We analysed the immunological properties of purified chitin particles derived from the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which led to the selective secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. We identified NOD2, TLR9 and the mannose receptor as essential fungal chitin-recognition receptors for the induction of this response. Chitin reduced LPS-induced inflammation in vivo and may therefore contribute to the resolution of the immune response once the pathogen has been defeated. Fungal chitin also induced eosinophilia in vivo, underpinning its ability to induce asthma. Polymorphisms in the identified chitin receptors, NOD2 and TLR9, predispose individuals to inflammatory conditions and dysregulated expression of chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins, whose activity is essential to generate IL-10-inducing fungal chitin particles in vitro, have also been linked to inflammatory conditions and asthma. Chitin recognition is therefore critical for immune homeostasis and is likely to have a significant role in infectious and allergic disease.
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Treatment of ocular rosacea with once-daily low-dose doxycycline.
Cornea
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of once-daily systemic treatment of ocular rosacea with a slow-release form of 40 mg of doxycycline.
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Processing of laminin ? chains generates peptides involved in wound healing and host defense.
J Innate Immun
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2014
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Laminins play a fundamental role in basement membrane architecture and function in human skin. The C-terminal laminin G domain-like (LG) modules of laminin ? chains are modified by proteolysis to generate LG1-3 and secreted LG4-5 tandem modules. In this study, we provide evidence that skin-derived cells process and secrete biologically active peptides from the LG4-5 module of the laminin ?3, ?4 and ?5 chain in vitro and in vivo. We show enhanced expression and processing of the LG4-5 module of laminin ?3 in keratinocytes after infection and in chronic wounds in which the level of expression and further processing of the LG4-5 module correlated with the speed of wound healing. Furthermore, bacterial or host-derived proteases promote processing of laminin ?3 LG4-5. On a functional level, we show that LG4-5-derived peptides play a role in wound healing. Moreover, we demonstrate that LG4-derived peptides from the ?3, ?4 and ?5 chains have broad antimicrobial activity and possess strong chemotactic activity to mononuclear cells. Thus, the data strongly suggest a novel multifunctional role for laminin LG4-5-derived peptides in human skin and its involvement in physiological processes and pathological conditions such as inflammation, chronic wounds and skin infection.
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In vivo tracking of Th1 cells by PET reveals quantitative and temporal distribution and specific homing in lymphatic tissue.
J. Nucl. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Although T cells can be labeled for noninvasive in vivo imaging, little is known about the impact of such labeling on T-cell function, and most imaging methods do not provide holistic information about trafficking kinetics, homing sites, or quantification.
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Localization and functionality of the inflammasome in neutrophils.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Neutrophils represent the major fraction of circulating immune cells and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection and inflammation. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that regulates the generation of IL-1 family proteins. The precise subcellular localization and functionality of the inflammasome in human neutrophils are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that highly purified human neutrophils express key components of the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasomes, particularly apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), AIM2, and caspase-1. Subcellular fractionation and microscopic analyses further showed that inflammasome components were localized in the cytoplasm and also noncanonically in secretory vesicle and tertiary granule compartments. Whereas IL-1? and IL-18 were expressed at the mRNA level and released as protein, highly purified neutrophils neither expressed nor released IL-1? at baseline or upon stimulation. Upon inflammasome activation, highly purified neutrophils released substantially lower levels of IL-1? protein compared with partially purified neutrophils. Serine proteases and caspases were differentially involved in IL-1? release, depending on the stimulus. Spontaneous activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophils in vivo affected IL-1?, but not IL-18 release. In summary, these studies show that human neutrophils express key components of the inflammasome machinery in distinct intracellular compartments and release IL-1? and IL-18, but not IL-1? or IL-33 protein. Targeting the neutrophil inflammasome may represent a future therapeutic strategy to modulate neutrophilic inflammatory diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, or sepsis.
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Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß) peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.
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Acid sphingomyelinase regulates platelet cell membrane scrambling, secretion, and thrombus formation.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Platelet activation is essential for primary hemostasis and acute thrombotic vascular occlusions. On activation, platelets release their prothrombotic granules and expose phosphatidylserine, thus fostering thrombin generation and thrombus formation. In other cell types, both degranulation and phosphatidylserine exposure are modified by sphingomyelinase-dependent formation of ceramide. The present study thus explored whether acid sphingomyelinase participates in the regulation of platelet secretion, phosphatidylserine exposure, and thrombus formation.
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Increasing circulation of Alaria alata mesocercaria in wild boar populations of the Rhine valley, France, 2007-2011.
Vet. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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The presence of the mesocercarial stage of Alaria alata (Goeze, 1792) in wild boar meat represents a potential risk for human, but little is known about the circulation of mesocercaria in wild boar populations. Routine Trichinella inspection, mandatorily performed in wild boar in France, also allowed detecting mesocercaria. We analyzed the results of this detection in the carcasses of 27,582 wild boars hunted in 2007-2011, in 502 hunting areas of the Rhine valley. Prevalence was globally low (0.6%), but 12% of the hunting areas were affected. These were clustered in lowlands of the Rhine valley, and prevalence strongly decreased with increasing elevation. In the lowlands, prevalence doubled between 2007 and 2011. This time trend and the geographic aggregation of positive wild boars suggest risk management measures based on targeted surveillance, control and prevention.
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Unwanted baggage.
BMJ Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2013
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An elderly woman with a rapidly progressing lower leg ulcer presented with features of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The ulcer had occurred after hitting her leg against a piece of luggage. The causative pathogen in our case was by Corynebacterium ulcerans, demonstrated in bacterial cultures and by PCR. Disease progression was stopped only by Linezolid intravenous. after several other antibiotics failed to help. Diphtheria is known to most physicians as a respiratory disease caused by Corynebacterium diphtheria which is occurring in the developed world infrequently because of widespread use of immunisation programmes. However, cutaneous infection with diphtheria is increasingly being diagnosed.
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Ocular rosacea: a dermatologic perspective.
J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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As many as 50% of patients given the diagnosis of cutaneous rosacea also have ocular rosacea. Conservative figures indicate that approximately 10 million patients are affected by ocular rosacea in the United States alone. Despite this prevalence, ocular symptoms of rosacea are often improperly diagnosed, particularly when they occur in the absence of skin involvement.
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Chorein sensitivity of cytoskeletal organization and degranulation of platelets.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
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Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc), a lethal disease caused by defective chorein, is characterized by neurodegeneration and erythrocyte acanthocytosis. The functional significance of chorein in other cell types remained ill-defined. The present study revealed chorein expression in blood platelets. As compared to platelets from healthy volunteers, platelets from patients with ChAc displayed a 47% increased globular/filamentous actin ratio, indicating actin depolymerization. Moreover, phosphoinositide-3-kinase subunit p85 phosphorylation, p21 protein-activated kinase (PAK1) phosphorylation, as well as vesicle-associated membrane protein 8 (VAMP8) expression were significantly reduced in platelets from patients with ChAc (by 17, 22, and 39%, respectively) and in megakaryocytic (MEG-01) cells following chorein silencing (by 16, 54, and 11%, respectively). Activation-induced platelet secretion from dense granules (ATP release) and ? granules (P-selectin exposure) were significantly less (by 55% after stimulation with 1 ?g/ml CRP and by 33% after stimulation with 5 ?M TRAP, respectively) in ChAc platelets than in control platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation following stimulation with different platelet agonists was significantly impaired. These observations reveal a completely novel function of chorein, i.e., regulation of secretion and aggregation of blood platelets.
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T-helper-1-cell cytokines drive cancer into senescence.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2013
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Cancer control by adaptive immunity involves a number of defined death and clearance mechanisms. However, efficient inhibition of exponential cancer growth by T cells and interferon-? (IFN-?) requires additional undefined mechanisms that arrest cancer cell proliferation. Here we show that the combined action of the T-helper-1-cell cytokines IFN-? and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) directly induces permanent growth arrest in cancers. To safely separate senescence induced by tumour immunity from oncogene-induced senescence, we used a mouse model in which the Simian virus 40 large T antigen (Tag) expressed under the control of the rat insulin promoter creates tumours by attenuating p53- and Rb-mediated cell cycle control. When combined, IFN-? and TNF drive Tag-expressing cancers into senescence by inducing permanent growth arrest in G1/G0, activation of p16INK4a (also known as CDKN2A), and downstream Rb hypophosphorylation at serine?795. This cytokine-induced senescence strictly requires STAT1 and TNFR1 (also known as TNFRSF1A) signalling in addition to p16INK4a. In vivo, Tag-specific T-helper 1 cells permanently arrest Tag-expressing cancers by inducing IFN-?- and TNFR1-dependent senescence. Conversely, Tnfr1(-/-)Tag-expressing cancers resist cytokine-induced senescence and grow aggressively, even in TNFR1-expressing hosts. Finally, as IFN-? and TNF induce senescence in numerous murine and human cancers, this may be a general mechanism for arresting cancer progression.
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Vemurafenib potently induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in BRAFV600E melanoma cells.
Sci Signal
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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The V600E mutation in the kinase BRAF is frequently detected in melanomas and results in constitutive activation of BRAF, which then promotes cell proliferation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Although the BRAFV600E kinase inhibitor vemurafenib has remarkable antitumor activity in patients with BRAFV600E-mutated melanoma, its effects are limited by the onset of drug resistance. We found that exposure of melanoma cell lines with the BRAFV600E mutation to vemurafenib decreased the abundance of antiapoptotic proteins and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Vemurafenib-treated melanoma cells showed increased cytosolic concentration of calcium, a potential trigger for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which can lead to apoptosis. Consistent with an ER stress-induced response, vemurafenib decreased the abundance of the ER chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 78, increased the abundance of the spliced isoform of the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) (which transcriptionally activates genes involved in ER stress responses), increased the phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2? (which would be expected to inhibit protein synthesis), and induced the expression of ER stress-related genes. Knockdown of the ER stress response protein activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) significantly reduced vemurafenib-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the ER stress inducer thapsigargin prevented invasive growth of tumors formed from vemurafenib-sensitive melanoma cells in vivo. In melanoma cells with low sensitivity or resistance to vemurafenib, combination treatment with thapsigargin augmented or induced apoptosis. Thus, thapsigargin or other inducers of ER stress may be useful in combination therapies to overcome vemurafenib resistance.
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Gastric antimicrobial peptides fail to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection due to selective induction and resistance.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Although antimicrobial peptides protect mucus and mucosa from bacteria, Helicobacter pylori is able to colonize the gastric mucus. To clarify in which extend Helicobacter escapes the antimicrobial defense, we systematically assessed susceptibility and expression levels of different antimicrobial host factors in gastric mucosa with and without H. pylori infection.
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Platelet-derived MHC class I confers a pseudonormal phenotype to cancer cells that subverts the antitumor reactivity of natural killer immune cells.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2011
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Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important role in tumor immunosurveillance, preferentially eliminating targets with low or absent expression of MHC class I and stress-induced expression of ligands for activating NK receptors. Platelets promote metastasis by protecting disseminating tumor cells from NK cell immunosurveillance, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we show that tumor cells rapidly get coated in the presence of platelets in vitro, and circulating tumor cells of cancer patients display coexpression of platelet markers. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, confocal microscopy, and analyses on an ultrastructural level using immunoelectron microscopy revealed that such coating may cause transfer of MHC class I onto the tumor cell surface resulting in high-level expression of platelet-derived normal MHC class I. The resulting "phenotype of false pretenses" disrupts recognition of tumor cell missing self, thereby impairing cytotoxicity and IFN-? production by NK cells. Thus, our data indicate that platelets, by conferring an unsuspicious "pseudonormal" phenotype, may enable a molecular mimicry that allows metastasizing tumor cells to downregulate MHC class I, to escape T-cell-mediated immunity without inducing susceptibility to NK cell reactivity.
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Atg13 and FIP200 act independently of Ulk1 and Ulk2 in autophagy induction.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2011
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Under normal growth conditions the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) negatively regulates the central autophagy regulator complex consisting of Unc-51-like kinases 1/2 (Ulk1/2), focal adhesion kinase family-interacting protein of 200 kDa (FIP200) and Atg13. Upon starvation, mTORC1-mediated repression of this complex is released, which then leads to Ulk1/2 activation. In this scenario, Atg13 has been proposed as an adaptor mediating the interaction between Ulk1/2 and FIP200 and enhancing Ulk1/2 kinase activity. Using Atg13-deficient cells, we demonstrate that Atg13 is indispensable for autophagy induction. We further show that Atg13 function strictly depends on FIP200 binding. In contrast, the simultaneous knockout of Ulk1 and Ulk2 did not have a similar effect on autophagy induction. Accordingly, the Ulk1-dependent phosphorylation sites we identified in Atg13 are expendable for this process. This suggests that Atg13 has an additional function independent of Ulk1/2 and that Atg13 and FIP200 act in concert during autophagy induction.
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The facultative intracellular pathogen Candida glabrata subverts macrophage cytokine production and phagolysosome maturation.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2011
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Although Candida glabrata is an important human pathogenic yeast, its pathogenicity mechanisms are largely unknown. Immune evasion strategies seem to play key roles during infection, since very little inflammation is observed in mouse models. Furthermore, C. glabrata multiplies intracellularly after engulfment by macrophages. In this study, we sought to identify the strategies that enable C. glabrata to survive phagosome biogenesis and antimicrobial activities within human monocyte-derived macrophages. We show that, despite significant intracellular proliferation, macrophage damage or apoptosis was not apparent, and production of reactive oxygen species was inhibited. Additionally, with the exception of GM-CSF, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were only marginally increased. We demonstrate that adhesion to and internalization by macrophages occur within minutes, and recruitment of endosomal early endosomal Ag 1 and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 indicates phagosome maturation. However, phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata, but not heat-killed yeasts, failed to recruit cathepsin D and were only weakly acidified. This inhibition of acidification did not require fungal viability, but it had a heat-sensitive surface attribute. Therefore, C. glabrata modifies the phagosome into a nonacidified environment and multiplies until the host cells finally lyse and release the fungi. Our results suggest persistence of C. glabrata within macrophages as a possible immune evasion strategy.
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Interleukin 23 expression in pyoderma gangrenosum and targeted therapy with ustekinumab.
Arch Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2011
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Interleukin (IL)-23 is involved in the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory Crohn disease. Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is often associated with and can even be the first manifestation of this disease and has abundant neutrophilic infiltration. Because IL-23 plays a critical role in driving inflammation associated with IL-17 production and especially neutrophil recruitment, we suspect that PG might be driven by a pathogenetic mechanism similar to that of inflammatory bowel diseases or psoriasis.
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Treatment of ocular rosacea with 40 mg doxycycline in a slow release form.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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About 30-50 % of rosacea patients have ocular involvement. The symptoms range from a foreign-body sensation to conjunctivitis or blepharitis and may even include severe corneal ulcerations. Systemic treatment is generally with tetracycline. Side effects can occur with the usual antimicrobial dose.
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Potential role of probiotic bacteria in the treatment and prevention of localised candidosis.
Mycoses
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
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The extensive use of immunosuppressive therapies in recent years has increased the number of patients prone to or actually suffering from localised candidosis. As Candida species gain increasing resistance towards common antifungal drugs, new strategies are needed to prevent and treat infections caused by these pathogens. Probiotic bacteria have been in vogue in the past two decades. More and more dairy products containing such organisms offer promising potential beneficial effects on human health and well-being. Because of the ability of probiotic bacteria to inhibit the growth of pathogens and to modulate human immune responses, these bacteria could provide new possibilities in antifungal therapy. We summarise the recent findings concerning the usefulness of probiotic treatment in localised candidosis, as well as discussing possible risks of probiotic treatment and highlighting the molecular mechanisms that are believed to contribute to probiotic effects.
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Host-pathogen interactions and virulence-associated genes during Candida albicans oral infections.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2011
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Oral infections with Candida albicans are very common diseases in even only mildly immunocompromised patients. By using genome-wide microarrays, in vitro infection models and samples from patients with pseudomembranous candidiasis, several genes have been identified which encode known and unknown fungal factors associated with oral infection. The expression of selected genes has been investigated via qRT-PCR in both in vitro models and in vivo samples from patients. Several lines of evidence suggest that fungal morphology plays a key role in adhesion to and invasion into oral epithelial cells and mutants lacking regulators of hyphal formation are attenuated in their ability to invade and damage epithelial cells. Adhesion is mediated by hyphal-associated factors such as Hwp1 and the Als adhesin family. Hyphal formation facilitates epithelial invasion via two routes: active penetration and induced endocytosis. While induced endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the adhesin and invasin Als3, active penetration seems to be supported by hydrolase activity and mechanical pressure. Expression profiles reflect the morphological switch and an adaptive response to neutral pH, non-glucose carbon sources, and nitrosative stress.
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Interaction of the mucosal barrier with accessory immune cells during fungal infection.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2011
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The mucosal epithelium is of central importance in host defence and immune surveillance, as it is the primary cell layer that initially encounters environmental microorganisms. Induction of antifungal innate immune responses depends on recognition of fungal components by host pattern recognition receptors. Members of the Toll-like receptor family have emerged as key sensors that recognize fungal pathogens and trigger defence responses. During oral infection with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, a large number of cytokines is secreted by oral epithelial cells, which in turn activate myeloid cells in the submucosal layers to clear the invading pathogen. Recent data provide novel insights into the complex molecular mechanisms of innate immune responses initiated by cooperation between epithelial cells and neutrophils. In this review, we discuss the role of epithelial TLRs and how the immunological crosstalk between C. albicans-infected oral epithelium and neutrophils protects the mucosal surface from fungal invasion and cell injury.
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Function of erbB receptors and DNA-PKcs on phosphorylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear Akt at S473 induced by erbB1 ligand and ionizing radiation.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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In the present study effect of erbB2 as well as DNA-PKcs on ionizing radiation (IR)- and erbB1 ligand-induced phosphorylation of Akt at S473 in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions was investigated.
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Nuclear epidermal growth factor receptor modulates cellular radio-sensitivity by regulation of chromatin access.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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Nuclear EGFR is involved in cellular stress management and regulation of cellular radio-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mode of nuclear EGFR action.
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Ulceroglandular tularemia.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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An increasing number of patients with the zoonosis tularemia have been reported in the last few years in Europe. Tularemia can be divided into different forms depending on its appearance. Tularemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of diseases that present with an ulcer and regional lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis can be confirmed by culturing Francisella?tularensis. With effective antibiotic intervention, the prognosis is favorable. Typically tularemia develops after outdoor activities; it is generally transferred by blood-sucking arthropods from infected wild animals to humans.
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Characterization of an Enterococcus faecium small-colony variant isolated from blood culture.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Small-colony variants (SCVs) of bacteria are slow-growing subpopulations which can cause latent or recurrent infections due to better intracellular survival compared to their wild-type counterparts. Atypical colony morphology and altered biochemical profile may lead to failure in identification of SCV strains. We here report for the first time the isolation of an Enterococcus faecium SCV phenotype. The case of a 65-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia who developed symptoms of sepsis during induction chemotherapy is presented. E. faecium with normal and SCV phenotype was isolated from blood cultures. At the same time urine culture was positive with E. faecium suggesting that bacteraemia originated from the urinary tract. The SCV phenotype was characterized by atypical growth behaviour. Electron microscopic analyses revealed perturbation of the separation of daughter cells and the accumulation of cell wall material. Accordingly, the SCV variant showed a dysfunction or lack of spontaneous autolysis whereas the normal phenotype did not. In contrast to conventional identification systems based on biochemical characteristics, the E. faecium SCV was precisely identified by MALDI-TOF MS analysis implemented in our laboratory. Hence, the increasing use of MALDI-TOF MS analysis for the identification of bacteria might be an appropriate tool for the detection of SCV variants, the diagnosis of which is of importance for the clinical outcome and the antibiotic treatment.
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High shear flow induces migration of adherent human platelets.
Platelets
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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Shear forces are generated in all parts of the vascular system and contribute directly and indirectly to vascular disease progression. Endothelial cells are able to adapt to flow conditions, and are known to polarize and migrate in response to shear forces. Platelets exposed to shear stress are activated and release bioactive molecules from their alpha granules. So far, platelets have been considered to be static cells that do not leave the site of tight adhesion. However, we have recently been able to demonstrate the capacity of platelets to migrate in response to stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1). In this project, we have demonstrated that platelets accumulate in areas with a high concentration of SDF-1 under flow conditions and respond to high shear stress by cellular polarization, cytoskeletal reorganisation, and flow-directed migration. In this context, we have shown increased Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) phosphorylation and intracellular redistribution of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) under high-shear stress conditions. The effect of flow-induced platelet migration has not previously been recognized and offers a new role for platelets as mobile cells. Their migratory potential may enable platelets to cover intimal lesions and contribute to vascular repair.
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?-Catenin signaling increases during melanoma progression and promotes tumor cell survival and chemoresistance.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2011
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Beta-catenin plays an important role in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis by controlling either cadherin-mediated cell adhesion or transcriptional activation of target gene expression. In many types of cancers nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been observed. Our data indicate that during melanoma progression an increased dependency on the transcriptional function of beta-catenin takes place. Blockade of beta-catenin in metastatic melanoma cell lines efficiently induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion in monolayer and 3-dimensional skin reconstructs and decreases chemoresistance. In addition, subcutaneous melanoma growth in SCID mice was almost completely inhibited by an inducible beta-catenin knockdown. In contrast, the survival of benign melanocytes and primary melanoma cell lines was less affected by beta-catenin depletion. However, enhanced expression of beta-catenin in primary melanoma cell lines increased invasive capacity in vitro and tumor growth in the SCID mouse model. These data suggest that beta-catenin is an essential survival factor for metastatic melanoma cells, whereas it is dispensable for the survival of benign melanocytes and primary, non-invasive melanoma cells. Furthermore, beta-catenin increases tumorigenicity of primary melanoma cell lines. The differential requirements for beta-catenin signaling in aggressive melanoma versus benign melanocytic cells make beta-catenin a possible new target in melanoma therapy.
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IL-22 and TNF-? represent a key cytokine combination for epidermal integrity during infection with Candida albicans.
Eur. J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2011
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T cells exercise their full impact on target cells through a combination of secreted cytokines. The recently described T helper cell subset Th22 is characterized by a combinatorial secretion of IL-22 and TNF-?. Here, we demonstrate that IL-22 increases the TNF-?-dependent induction and secretion of several immune-modulatory molecules such as initial complement factors C1r and C1s, antimicrobial peptides S100A7 and HBD-2 (human ? defensin 2), and antimicrobial chemokines CXCL-9/-10/-11 in primary human keratinocytes. The synergism of IL-22 and TNF-? is transmitted intracellularly by MAP kinases and downstream by transcription factors of the AP-1 family. The induction of innate immunity is relevant in an in vitro infection model, where keratinocytes stimulated with Th22 supernatants or recombinant IL-22 plus TNF-? effectively inhibit the growth of Candida albicans and maintain survival of epithelia. Accordingly, the combinatorial stimulation of keratinocytes with IL-22 and TNF-? most efficiently conserves the integrity of the epidermal barrier in a three-dimensional skin infection model as compared with IFN-?, IL-17, IL-22 or TNF-? alone. In summary, we demonstrate that IL-22 and TNF-? represent a potent, synergistic cytokine combination for cutaneous immunity.
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Reduction of disulphide bonds unmasks potent antimicrobial activity of human ?-defensin 1.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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Human epithelia are permanently challenged by bacteria and fungi, including commensal and pathogenic microbiota. In the gut, the fraction of strict anaerobes increases from proximal to distal, reaching 99% of bacterial species in the colon. At colonic mucosa, oxygen partial pressure is below 25% of airborne oxygen content, moreover microbial metabolism causes reduction to a low redox potential of -200?mV to -300?mV in the colon. Defensins, characterized by three intramolecular disulphide-bridges, are key effector molecules of innate immunity that protect the host from infectious microbes and shape the composition of microbiota at mucosal surfaces. Human ?-defensin 1 (hBD-1) is one of the most prominent peptides of its class but despite ubiquitous expression by all human epithelia, comparison with other defensins suggested only minor antibiotic killing activity. Whereas much is known about the activity of antimicrobial peptides in aerobic environments, data about reducing environments are limited. Herein we show that after reduction of disulphide-bridges hBD-1 becomes a potent antimicrobial peptide against the opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and against anaerobic, Gram-positive commensals of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species. Reduced hBD-1 differs structurally from oxidized hBD-1 and free cysteines in the carboxy terminus seem important for the bactericidal effect. In vitro, the thioredoxin (TRX) system is able to reduce hBD-1 and TRX co-localizes with reduced hBD-1 in human epithelia. Hence our study indicates that reduced hBD-1 shields the healthy epithelium against colonisation by commensal bacteria and opportunistic fungi. Accordingly, an intimate interplay between redox-regulation and innate immune defence seems crucial for an effective barrier protecting human epithelia.
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The NF?B pathway inhibitors Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide induce programmed cell death in anucleated Erythrocytes.
Cell. Physiol. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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The preclinical compounds Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide trigger apoptosis, an effect contributing to their antiinflammatory action. The substances interfere with the activation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor NF?B, by inhibiting NF?B directly (parthenolide) or by interfering with the inactivation of the NF?B inhibitory protein I?B-? (Bay 11-7082). Beyond that, the substances may be effective in part by nongenomic effects. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may undergo apoptosis-like cell death (eryptosis) characterized by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure, and cell shrinkage. Thus, erythrocytes allow the study of nongenomic mechanisms contributing to suicidal cell death, e.g. Ca(2+) leakage or glutathione depletion. The present study utilized Western blotting to search for NF?B and I?B-? expression in erythrocytes, FACS analysis to determine cytosolic Ca(2+) (Fluo3 fluorescence), phosphatidylserine exposure (annexin V binding), and cell volume (forward scatter), as well as an enzymatic method to determine glutathione levels. As a result, both NF?B and I?B-? are expressed in erythrocytes. Targeting the NF?B pathway by Bay 11-7082 (IC(50) ? 10 ?M) and parthenolide (IC(50) ? 30 ?M) triggered suicidal erythrocyte death as shown by annexin V binding and decrease of forward scatter. Bay 11-7082 treatment further increased intracellular Ca(2+) and led to depletion of reduced glutathione. The effects of Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide on annexin V binding could be fully reversed by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, the pharmacological inhibitors of NF?B, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, interfere with the survival of erythrocytes involving mechanisms other than disruption of NF?B-dependent gene expression.
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Skin commensals amplify the innate immune response to pathogens by activation of distinct signaling pathways.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2010
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Little is known about the impact of different microbial signals on skin barrier organ function and the interdependency between resident microflora and pathogenic microorganisms. This study shows that commensal and pathogenic staphylococci differ in their ability to induce expression of antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) and activate different signaling pathways in human primary keratinocytes. Whereas secreted factors of skin commensals induce expression of the AMPs HBD-3 and RNase7 in primary human keratinocytes via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, EGFR, and NF-?B activation, those of pathogenic staphylococci activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathways and suppress NF-?B activation. Interestingly, commensal bacteria are able to amplify the innate immune response of human keratinocytes to pathogens by increased induction of AMP expression and abrogation of NF-?B suppression, suggesting that the two activation pathways can act in a synergistic way. These data indicate that commensal and pathogenic microorganisms evolved specific mechanisms to modulate innate immunity of the skin.
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The farnesyl transferase inhibitor lonafarnib inhibits mTOR signaling and enforces sorafenib-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2010
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Farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs) inhibit the farnesylation of proteins, including RAS and RHEB (Ras homolog enriched in brain). RAS signals to the RAF-MEK-ERK (MAPK) and PI3K-AKT-mTOR (AKT) signaling pathways, which have a major role in melanoma progression. RHEB positively regulates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We investigated the effects of the FTI lonafarnib alone and in combination with MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) or AKT (acutely transforming retrovirus AKT8 in rodent T-cell lymphoma) pathway inhibitors on proliferation, survival, and invasive tumor growth of melanoma cells. Lonafarnib alone did not sufficiently inhibit melanoma cell growth. Combinations of lonafarnib with AKT pathway inhibitors did not significantly increase melanoma cell growth inhibition. In contrast, combinations of lonafarnib with MAPK pathway inhibitors yielded additional growth-inhibiting effects. In particular, the combination of the FTI lonafarnib with the pan-RAF inhibitor sorafenib synergistically inhibited melanoma cell growth, significantly enhanced sorafenib-induced apoptosis, and completely suppressed invasive tumor growth in monolayer and organotypic cultures, respectively. Apoptosis induction was associated with upregulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related transcription factors p8 and CHOP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein), and downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma-2) family protein Mcl-1(myeloid cell leukemia 1). Lonafarnib did not affect MAPK and AKT but did affect mTOR signaling. Together, these findings suggest that the FTI lonafarnib inhibits mTOR signaling and enforces sorafenib-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells and may therefore represent an effective alternative for melanoma treatment.
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Targeting glutathione by dimethylfumarate protects against experimental malaria by enhancing erythrocyte cell membrane scrambling.
Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2010
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The balance between GSH-levels and oxidative stress is critical for cell survival. The GSH-levels of erythrocytes are dramatically decreased during infection with Plasmodium spp. We therefore investigated the consequences of targeting GSH for erythrocyte and Plasmodium survival in vitro and in vivo using dimethylfumarate (DMF) at therapeutically established dosage. We first show that noninfected red blood cells (RBC) exposed to DMF undergo changes typical of apoptosis or eryptosis, such as cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with subsequent phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. DMF did not induce appreciable hemolysis. DMF-triggered PS exposure was mediated by intracellular GSH depletion and reversed by the antioxidative N-acetyl-l-cysteine. DMF treatment controlled intraerythrocyte DNA amplification and in vitro parasitemia of Plasmodium falciparum-infected RBC. In vivo, DMF treatment had no effect on RBC count or GSH levels in noninfected mice. Consistent with its effects on infected RBC, DMF treatment abrogated parasitemia and enhanced the survival of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei from 0% to 60%. In conclusion, DMF sensitizes the erythrocytes to the effect of Plasmodium infection on PS exposure, thus accelerating the clearance of infected erythrocytes. Accordingly, DMF treatment favorably influences the clinical course of malaria. As DMF targets mechanisms within the host cell, it is not likely to generate resistance of the pathogen.
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Staphylococcal peptidoglycan co-localizes with Nod2 and TLR2 and activates innate immune response via both receptors in primary murine keratinocytes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2010
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In mammalian host cells staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN) is recognized by Nod2. Whether PGN is also recognized by TLR2 is disputed. Here we carried out PGN co-localization and stimulation studies with TLR2 and Nod2 in wild type and mutant host cells. To exclude contamination with lipoproteins, polymeric staphylococcal PGN (PGN(pol)) was isolated from Staphylococcus aureus ?lgt (lacking lipidated prelipoproteins). PGN(pol) was biotinylated (PGN-Bio) for fluorescence monitoring with specific antibodies. Keratinocytes from murine oral epithelium (MK) readily internalized PGN-Bio in an endocytosis-like process. In wt MK, PGN(pol) induced intracellular accumulation of Nod2 and TLR2 and co-localized with Nod2 and TLR2, but not with TLR4. In TLR2-deficient MK Nod2 and in Nod2-deficient MK TLR2 was induced, indicating that PGN(pol) recognition by Nod2 is independent of TLR2 and vice versa. In both mutants IL-6 and IL-1B release was decreased by approximately 50% compared to wt MK, suggesting that the immune responses induced by Nod2 and TLR2 are comparable and that the two receptors act additively in MK. In TLR2-transfected HEK293 cells PGN(pol) induced NFkB-promoter fused luciferase expression. To support the data, co-localization and signaling studies were carried out with SHL-PGN, a lipase protein covalently tethered to PGN-fragments of varying sizes at its C-terminus. SHL-PGN also co-localized with Nod2 or TLR2 and induced their accumulation, while SHL without PGN did not. The results show that staphylococcal PGN not only co-localizes with Nod2 but also with TLR2. PGN is able to stimulate the immune system via both receptors.
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The Candida albicans cell wall protein Rhd3/Pga29 is abundant in the yeast form and contributes to virulence.
Yeast
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2010
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The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-modified protein Rhd3/Pga29 of the human pathogen Candida albicans belongs to a family of cell wall proteins that are widespread among Candida species but are not found in other fungi. Pga29 is covalently linked to the beta-1,3-glucan framework of the cell wall via beta-1,6-glucan. It is a small and abundant O-glycosylated protein and requires the protein-O-mannosyl transferase Pmt1 for glycosylation. Furthermore, Pga29 is strongly expressed in yeast cells but is downregulated in hyphae. Removal of the PGA29 gene in C. albicans leads to a significant reduction of cell wall mannan; however, Pga29 does not seem to have a major role in maintaining cell wall integrity. In addition, adhesion capacity and hyphae formation appear normal in pga29 deletion mutants. Importantly, the pga29 deletion mutant is less virulent, and infection of reconstituted human epithelium with the pga29 mutant results in a diminished induction of proinflammatory cytokines, such as GM-CSF, TNF, IL-6 and IL-8. We propose that the reduced virulence of the pga29 mutant is a consequence of altered surface properties, resulting in altered fungal recognition.
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Nuclear EGFR shuttling induced by ionizing radiation is regulated by phosphorylation at residue Thr654.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
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Nuclear localisation of EGFR is associated with treatment resistance of tumor cells. The aim of this study was to identify molecular targets to block nuclear shuttling of EGFR. Mutation of Thr654, located within the putative EGFR NLS demonstrated that phosphorylation of this residue is essential for nuclear EGFR shuttling following irradiation. Deletion of Thr654 blocked nuclear transport of EGFR, whereas mutation to Glu increased shuttling. Treatment with a peptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated NLS, abolished nuclear EGFR transport and reduced radiation-induced activation of DNA-PK, essential for DNA-repair. In accordance with that, lack of nuclear EGFR increased residual DNA damage in tumor cells and reduced cellular survival following irradiation. Blockage of nuclear EGFR shuttling may be a new strategy to fight treatment resistance.
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Lysozyme activates Enterococcus faecium to induce necrotic cell death in macrophages.
Cell. Mol. Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2010
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Enterococci are commensal organisms in the alimentary tract. However, they can cause a variety of life-threatening infections, especially in nosocomial settings. We hypothesized that induction of cell death might enable these facultative pathogenic bacteria to evade the innate immune response and to cause infections of their host. We demonstrate that E. faecium when exposed to lysozyme induces cell death in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometric analyses of J774A.1 macrophages infected with E. faecium revealed loss of cell membrane integrity indicated by uptake of propidium iodide and decrease of the inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential DeltaPsi(m). Inhibition of caspases, treatment of macrophages with cytochalasin D, or rifampicin did not prevent cells from dying, suggesting cell death mechanisms that are independent of caspase activation, bacterial uptake, and intracellular bacterial replication. Characteristics of necrotic cell death were demonstrated by both lack of procaspase 3 activation and cell shrinkage, electron microscopy, and release of lactate dehydrogenase. Pretreatment of E. faecium with lysozyme and subsequently with broad spectrum protease considerably reduced cell death, suggesting that a bacterial surface protein is causative for cell death induction. Moreover, in a mouse peritonitis model we demonstrated that E. faecium induces cell death of peritoneal macrophages in vivo. Altogether, our results show that enterococci, under specific conditions such as exposure to lysozyme, induce necrotic cell death in macrophages, which might contribute to disseminated infections by these facultative pathogenic bacteria.
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Oxidized LDL-activated platelets induce vascular inflammation.
Semin. Thromb. Hemost.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2010
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Platelets are involved in the initiation of atherosclerosis by adherence to inflamed endothelium. Monocytes bind to these platelets and transmigrate into the vessel wall, transforming into macrophages and foam cells. We have previously shown that lipid-laden platelets are phagocytosed by macrophages. In this study we investigated the functional consequences of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake on platelet function and interaction with the endothelium. Human platelets were isolated from healthy donors and activated by adenosine diphosphate. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that oxLDL is located intracellularly in vesicles. With mepacrine costaining and confocal microtomography, we were able to identify dense granules as the vesicles that contain oxLDL. OxLDL-laden platelets induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in endothelial cells more than exogenous native LDL, oxLDL, and oxLDL-negative platelets. Furthermore, oxLDL-laden platelets induced foam cell development from CD34(+) progenitor cells. On endothelial regeneration, oxLDL-laden platelets had the opposite effect: The number of CD34(+) progenitor cells (colony-forming units) able to transform into endothelial cells was significantly reduced in the presence of oxLDL-platelets, whereas native LDL had no effect. Our results demonstrate that activated platelets internalize oxLDL and that oxLDL-laden platelets activate endothelium, inhibit endothelial regeneration, and promote foam cell development. Platelet oxLDL contributes significantly to vascular inflammation and is able to promote atherosclerosis.
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Capture of endothelial progenitor cells by a bispecific protein/monoclonal antibody molecule induces reendothelialization of vascular lesions.
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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Tissue injury is inevitably accompanied by disruption of the endothelium and exposure of the subendothelial matrix. To generate a guidance molecule directing progenitor cells to sites of vascular lesions, we designed a bifunctional protein. The protein consists of the soluble platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and an antibody to CD133 (hereafter called GPVI-CD133). In vitro and in vivo, this construct substantially mediates endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) homing to vascular lesions. Exposure of EPCs to GPVI-CD133 did not impair their capability to differentiate toward mature endothelial cells as verified by the formation of colony-forming units, the upregulation of endothelial markers CD31 and CD146 analyzed by flow cytometry or von Willebrand factor and endoglin assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy, as well as the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, GPVI-CD133 augments reendothelialization of vascular lesions. Thus, this bifunctional protein could be a potential new therapeutic option for cardiovascular diseases.
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PI3 kinase-dependent stimulation of platelet migration by stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1).
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2010
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Platelets have been regarded as static cells that do not move once they adhere to a matrix. The present study explored, whether platelets are able to migrate. In contrast to the current opinion, we found that platelets were mobile, able to migrate over a surface, and transmigrate through a transwell membrane and endothelium toward a source of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1). Platelet migration was stimulated by SDF-1, which led to the downstream activation and phosphorylation of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. SDF-1 signaling and subsequent platelet migration could be inhibited by CXCR4-receptor blocker AMD3100, pertussis toxin, inhibition of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) with LY294002 or wortmannin, and disruption of actin polymerization with cytochalasin B. The potential of platelets to migrate in an SDF-1-mediated fashion may redefine the role of platelets in the pathophysiology of vascular inflammation, subsequent atherosclerotic degeneration, and vascular regeneration.
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Hereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis: first report in a male patient.
Acta Derm. Venereol.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2010
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Progressive mucinous histiocytosis is a very rare, benign, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis limited to the skin. In total ten patients (all women) in four families and three sporadic cases have been reported. We report here the first published case of a male patient with progressive mucinous histiocytosis. The multiple red papules on the scalp and forearms were asymptomatic and had slowly increased over approximately the past 20 years. The patients mother had similar lesions. Histological examination revealed nodules in the dermis with histiocytes and mucin deposition. The histiocytes stained positively with CD31 and negative with CD34, CAM 5.2, PGM-1 and factor XIIIa. Ultrastructurally, the histiocytes showed numerous circular myelin bodies and zebra bodies reminiscent of those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. The genetic transmission of hereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis remains unclear; we assume an autosomal dominant transmission with some hormonal factor that makes hereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis more likely in women.
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Proteins of nucleotide and base excision repair pathways interact in mitochondria to protect from loss of subcutaneous fat, a hallmark of aging.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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Defects in the DNA repair mechanism nucleotide excision repair (NER) may lead to tumors in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or to premature aging with loss of subcutaneous fat in Cockayne syndrome (CS). Mutations of mitochondrial (mt)DNA play a role in aging, but a link between the NER-associated CS proteins and base excision repair (BER)-associated proteins in mitochondrial aging remains enigmatic. We show functional increase of CSA and CSB inside mt and complex formation with mtDNA, mt human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (mtOGG)-1, and mt single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSBP)-1 upon oxidative stress. MtDNA mutations are highly increased in cells from CS patients and in subcutaneous fat of aged Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice. Thus, the NER-proteins CSA and CSB localize to mt and directly interact with BER-associated human mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-1 to protect from aging- and stress-induced mtDNA mutations and apoptosis-mediated loss of subcutaneous fat, a hallmark of aging found in animal models, human progeroid syndromes like CS and in normal human aging.
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Inhibition of foam cell formation using a soluble CD68-Fc fusion protein.
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2010
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The appearance of lipid-rich foam cells is a major feature of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque formation. The transformation of macrophages into foam cells results from excessive uptake of cholesterol-rich particles by scavenger receptors such as CD68. We cloned a CD68-Fc immunoadhesin, a fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of the human CD68 and a human Fc domain, and investigated the function in vitro. Specific binding of CD68-Fc to OxLDL with an affinity of 10 nmol/L was determined by surface plasmon resonance and increased binding to lipid-rich human and ApoE(-/-) mice plaque tissue. This was confirmed both by immunohistochemical staining of CD68-Fc-treated paraffin sections from human plaques and by ELISA-based quantification of CD68-Fc binding to human atherosclerotic plaque extracts. In an in vitro model of macrophage/foam cell formation, CD68-Fc reduced foam cell formation significantly. This was caused both by interference of CD68-Fc with OxLDL uptake into macrophages and platelets and by the inhibition of platelet/OxLDL phagocytosis. Finally, expression of metalloproteinases by macrophages/foam cells was inhibited by CD68-Fc. In conclusion, CD68-Fc seems to be a promising new tool for preventing macrophage/foam cell formation. Thus, CD68-Fc might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with acute coronary syndrome by modulating the generation of vulnerable plaques.
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Susceptibility testing of amorolfine, bifonazole and ciclopiroxolamine against Trichophyton rubrum in an in vitro model of dermatophyte nail infection.
Med. Mycol.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2009
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Antimycotic nail lacquers are effective and safe for the treatment of onychomycosis. To assess the efficacy of three topical agents we studied the minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentration of amorolfine, bifonazole and ciclopiroxolamine. Amorolfine showed the most effective fungistatic and fungicidal activity in vitro against seven clinical Trichophyton rubrum nail isolates, followed in descending order by ciclopiroxolamine and bifonazole. To mimic a nail infection more appropriately, the nail minimum fungicidal concentration (Nail-MFC) was determined in an onychomycosis model. Amorolfine and ciclopiroxolamine had Nail-MFCs ranging from 2-32 microg/ml and 16-32 microg/ml, respectively. In contrast, bifonazole was unable to kill T. rubrum in this model. Statistical analyses of the results show a significant difference between the two treatments with amorolfine and ciclopiroxolamine (P<0.001). For amorolfine a mean concentration of 12.28 microg/ml (95%-CI=[8.66, 17.41]) was sufficient to kill all strains, while for ciclopiroxolamine about twice that concentration was needed, i.e., 24.13 microg/ml (95%-CI=[17.06, 34.13]). The individual sensitivity of six of the seven T. rubrum strains was higher for amorolfine. These data demonstrate that both amorolfine and ciclopiroxolamine effectively kill T. rubrum growing on nail powder and suggest a better cidal action for amorolfine. Further investigation would be required to determine if these in vitro data can partially explain the clinical observation of significantly higher cure rates in onychomycosis following a therapy with an amorolfine-containing nail lacquer formulation.
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Impaired mast cell activation in gene-targeted mice lacking the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2009
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The PI3K pathway plays a pivotal role in the stimulation of mast cells. PI3K-dependent kinases include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). The present study explored the role of SGK1 in mast cell function. Mast cells were isolated from bone marrow (BMMC) of SGK1 knockout mice (sgk1(-/-)) and their wild-type littermates (sgk1(+/+)). The BMMC number as well as CD117, CD34, and FcepsilonRI expression in BMCCs were similar in both genotypes. Upon Ag stimulation of the FcepsilonRI receptor, Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was markedly impaired in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. The currents through Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels induced by Ag were significantly higher in sgk1(+/+) BMMCs than in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. Treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 microM) led to activation of the K+ channels in both genotypes, indicating that the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels are similarly expressed and sensitive to activation by Ca(2+) in sgk1(+/+) and sgk1(-/-) BMMCs, and that blunted stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels was secondary to decreased Ca(2+) entry. Ag-IgE-induced degranulation and early IL-6 secretion were also significantly blunted in sgk1(-/-) BMMCs. The decrease in body temperature following Ag treatment, which reflects an anaphylactic reaction, was substantially reduced in sgk1(-/-) mice, pointing to impaired mast cell function in vivo. Serum histamine levels measured 30 min after induction of an anaphylactic reaction were significantly lower in sgk1(-/-) than in sgk1(+/+)mice. The observations reveal a critical role for SGK1 in ion channel regulation and the function of mast cells, and thus disclose a completely novel player in the regulation of allergic reaction.
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Pagetoid reticulosis (Woringer-Kolopp disease).
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2009
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Pagetoid reticulosis (Woringer-Kolopp disease) is a rare subtype of cutaneous CD8-positive T-cell lymphoma. A 41-year-old man presented with a 7-year history with a slowly progressive erythematous plaque on his right buttocks. With the working diagnosis of psoriasis, he was treated with topical corticosteroids which produced no improvement. Histological examination showed an epidermotropic T-cell lymphoma with predominance of CD8- vs.CD4-positive lymphocytes. Based on the clinical picture and the histological findings, we diagnosed pagetoid reticulosis. Excision of the plaque and cream PUVA photo-chemotherapy produced long-term remission.
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Nodular malignant melanoma and multiple cutaneous neoplasms under immunosuppression with azathioprine.
Melanoma Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2009
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Immunosuppressed patients are at increased risk of skin cancer. A 67-year-old renal transplant recipient developed a nodular malignant melanoma after 30 years of immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone. The patient died of metastatic disease 3 months after the diagnosis was made. The function of the renal graft was not affected at all. Renal transplant recipients are at high risk of developing nonmelanocytic skin tumors when on immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine A. Less common is the development of skin cancer during immunosuppression with azathioprine. Latest reports show the increased incidence of malignant melanoma in immunosuppressed patients. Our case illustrates the necessity of close dermatological surveillance of allograft recipients, to assure an early recognition of any malignant skin tumor and to reduce the risk of systemic metastatic disease.
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Direct crosstalk between mast cell-TNF and TNFR1-expressing endothelia mediates local tissue inflammation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2009
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Signaling through tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) controls bacterial infections and the induction of inflammatory Th1 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. By dissecting Th1 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity responses (DTHRs) into single steps, we localized a central defect to the missing TNFR1 expression by endothelial cells (ECs). Adoptive transfer and mast cell knockin experiments into Kit(W)/Kit(W-v), TNF(-/-), and TNFR1(-/-) mice showed that the signaling defect exclusively affects mast cell-EC interactions but not T cells or antigen-presenting cells. As a consequence, TNFR1(-/-) mice had strongly reduced mRNA and protein expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 during DTHR elicitation. In consequence, intravital fluorescence microscopy revealed up to 80% reduction of leukocyte rolling and firm adhesion in TNFR1(-/-) mice. As substitution of TNF(-/-) mice with TNF-producing mast cells fully restored DTHR in these mice, signaling of mast cell-derived TNF through TNFR1-expressing ECs is essential for the recruitment of leukocytes into sites of inflammation.
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Treatment of disseminated granuloma annulare with low-dose fumaric acid.
Acta Derm. Venereol.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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While localized variants of granuloma annulare are typically self-limited, disseminated granuloma annulare tends to be chronic and often therapy-resistant. Treatment with fumaric acid esters is effective for severe forms of psoriasis. Disseminated granuloma annulare has also been reported to respond to fumaric acid esters. We treated 8 patients (mean age 64.2 years; 4 men, 4 women) with low-dose fumaric acid esters for 1-18 months. One patient showed complete clearance, 4 marked improvement, one slight to moderate improvement and one no response. One patient discontinued treatment due to nausea after one month and another stopped it after 18 months. Five out of 8 patients tolerated the treatment well. Six patients developed transient, mild leucopaenia and one eosinophilia. None of these blood abnormalities necessitated discontinuation of therapy. Low-dose fumaric acid esters significantly improve disseminated granuloma annulare in approximately 63% of patients. Larger, controlled, prospective studies are needed to evaluate its efficacy and safety in this setting.
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Models of oral and vaginal candidiasis based on in vitro reconstituted human epithelia for the study of host-pathogen interactions.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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This protocol describes the setup, maintenance, and characteristics of models of oral and vaginal candidiasis based on well-established three-dimensional organotypic tissues of human oral and vaginal mucosa. Infection experiments are highly reproducible and can be used for the direct analysis of pathogen/epithelial cell interactions. Using the models, the several stages of infection by wild-type Candida albicans strains, the consequence of gene disruption of putative virulence factors in mutant cells, and the evaluation of the host immune response can be evaluated by histologic, biochemical, and molecular methods. As such, the models provide clear answers regarding protein and gene expression that are not complicated by nonepithelial factors. To study the impact of several host components, the mucosal infection models can be supplemented with immune cells, saliva, and probiotic bacteria, which might be relevant for host defense. It requires at least 3 days to be established and can be maintained thereafter for 2 to 4 days.
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Glycosylation of Candida albicans cell wall proteins is critical for induction of innate immune responses and apoptosis of epithelial cells.
PLoS ONE
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C. albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen of humans, causing local and superficial mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Given that the key structure mediating host-C. albicans interactions is the fungal cell wall, we aimed to identify features of the cell wall inducing epithelial responses and be associated with fungal pathogenesis. We demonstrate here the importance of cell wall protein glycosylation in epithelial immune activation with a predominant role for the highly branched N-glycosylation residues. Moreover, these glycan moieties induce growth arrest and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Using an in vitro model of oral candidosis we demonstrate, that apoptosis induction by C. albicans wild-type occurs in early stage of infection and strongly depends on intact cell wall protein glycosylation. These novel findings demonstrate that glycosylation of the C. albicans cell wall proteins appears essential for modulation of epithelial immunity and apoptosis induction, both of which may promote fungal pathogenesis in vivo.
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Alternative approaches to antifungal therapies.
Exp. Dermatol.
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The expansive use of immunosuppressive medications in fields such as transplantational medicine and oncology, the higher frequency of invasive procedures in an ageing population and the HIV/AIDS pandemic have increased the frequency of systemic fungal infections. At the same time, increased resistance of pathogenic fungi to classical antifungal agents has led to sustained research efforts targeting alternative antifungal strategies. In this review, we focus on two promising approaches: cationic peptides and the targeting of fungal virulence factors. Cationic peptides are small, predominantly positively charged protein fragments that exert direct and indirect antifungal activities, one mechanism of action being the permeabilization of the fungal membrane. They include lysozyme, defensins and cathelicidins as well as novel synthetic peptides. Among fungal virulence factors, the targeting of candidal secreted aspartic proteinases seems to be a particularly promising approach.
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Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 regulates reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in mast cells upon degranulation.
Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol.
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Aggregation of the high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc?RI) on mast cells (MCs) causes MC degranulation, a process that involves cortical F-actin disassembly. Actin depolymerization may be triggered by increase of cytosolic Ca(2+). Entry of Ca(2+) through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels is under powerful regulation by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1. Moreover, Fc?RI-dependent degranulation is decreased in SGK1-deficient (sgk1(-/-)) MCs. The present study addressed whether SGK1 is required for actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in MCs and whether modulation of actin architecture could underlie decreased degranulation of sgk1(-/-) MCs. Confirming previous results, release of ?-hexosaminidase reflecting Fc?RI-dependent degranulation was impaired in sgk1(-/-) MCs compared with sgk1(+/+) MCs. When CRAC channels were inhibited by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB; 50 ?M), MC degranulation was strongly decreased in both sgk1(+/+) and sgk1(-/-) MCs and the difference between genotypes was abolished. Moreover, degranulation was impaired by actin-stabilizing (phallacidin) and enhanced by actin-disrupting (cytochalasin B) agents to a similar extent in sgk1(+/+) MCs and sgk1(-/-) MCs, implying a regulatory role of actin reorganization in this event. In line with this, measurements of monomeric (G) and filamentous (F) actin content by FACS analysis and Western blotting of detergent-soluble and -insoluble cell fractions indicated an increase of the G/F-actin ratio in sgk1(+/+) MCs but not in sgk1(-/-) MCs upon Fc?RI ligation, an observation reflecting actin depolymerization. In sgk1(+/+) MCs, Fc?RI-induced actin depolymerization was abolished by 2-APB. The observed actin reorganization was confirmed by confocal laser microscopic analysis. Our observations uncover SGK1-dependent Ca(2+) entry in mast cells as a novel mechanism regulating actin cytoskeleton.
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A peptide derived from the highly conserved protein GAPDH is involved in tissue protection by different antifungal strategies and epithelial immunomodulation.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
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Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has an important role not only in glycolysis but also in nonmetabolic processes, including transcription activation and apoptosis. We report the isolation of a human GAPDH (hGAPDH) (2-32) fragment peptide from human placental tissue exhibiting antimicrobial activity. The peptide was internalized by cells of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans and initiated a rapid apoptotic mechanism, leading to killing of the fungus. Killing was dose-dependent, with 10??g?ml (3.1??M) and 100??g?ml hGAPDH (2-32) depolarizing 45% and 90% of the fungal cells in a population, respectively. Experimental C. albicans infection induced epithelial hGAPDH (2-32) expression. Addition of the peptide significantly reduced the tissue damage as compared with untreated experimental infection. Secreted aspartic proteinase (Sap) activity of C. albicans was inhibited by the fragment at higher concentrations, with a median effective dose of 160?mg?l(-1) (50??M) for Sap1p and 200?mg?l(-1) (63??M) for Sap2p, whereas Sap3 was not inhibited at all. Interestingly, hGAPDH (2-32) induced significant epithelial IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion and stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 expression at low concentrations independently of the presence of C. albicans, without any toxic mucosal effects. In the future, the combination of different antifungal strategies, e.g., a conventional fungicidal with immunomodulatory effects and the inhibition of fungal virulence factors, might be a promising treatment option.
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Candida albicans-epithelial interactions: dissecting the roles of active penetration, induced endocytosis and host factors on the infection process.
PLoS ONE
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Candida albicans frequently causes superficial infections by invading and damaging epithelial cells, but may also cause systemic infections by penetrating through epithelial barriers. C. albicans is a remarkable pathogen because it can invade epithelial cells via two distinct mechanisms: induced endocytosis, analogous to facultative intracellular enteropathogenic bacteria, and active penetration, similar to plant pathogenic fungi. Here we investigated the contributions of the two invasion routes of C. albicans to epithelial invasion. Using selective cellular inhibition approaches and differential fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that induced endocytosis contributes considerably to the early time points of invasion, while active penetration represents the dominant epithelial invasion route. Although induced endocytosis depends mainly on Als3-E-cadherin interactions, we observed E-cadherin independent induced endocytosis. Finally, we provide evidence of a protective role for serum factors in oral infection: human serum strongly inhibited C. albicans adhesion to, invasion and damage of oral epithelial cells.
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Akt promotes post-irradiation survival of human tumor cells through initiation, progression, and termination of DNA-PKcs-dependent DNA double-strand break repair.
Mol. Cancer Res.
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Akt phosphorylation has previously been described to be involved in mediating DNA damage repair through the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. Yet the mechanism how Akt stimulates DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)-dependent DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair has not been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Akt can interact with DNA-PKcs and promote its function during the NHEJ repair process. The results obtained indicate a prominent role of Akt, especially Akt1 in the regulation of NHEJ mechanism for DNA-DSB repair. As shown by pull-down assay of DNA-PKcs, Akt1 through its C-terminal domain interacts with DNA-PKcs. After exposure of cells to ionizing radiation (IR), Akt1 and DNA-PKcs form a functional complex in a first initiating step of DNA-DSB repair. Thereafter, Akt plays a pivotal role in the recruitment of AKT1/DNA-PKcs complex to DNA duplex ends marked by Ku dimers. Moreover, in the formed complex, Akt1 promotes DNA-PKcs kinase activity, which is the necessary step for progression of DNA-DSB repair. Akt1-dependent DNA-PKcs kinase activity stimulates autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 that is needed for efficient DNA-DSB repair and the release of DNA-PKcs from the damage site. Thus, targeting of Akt results in radiosensitization of DNA-PKcs and Ku80 expressing, but not of cells deficient for, either of these proteins. The data showed indicate for the first time that Akt through an immediate complex formation with DNA-PKcs can stimulate the accumulation of DNA-PKcs at DNA-DSBs and promote DNA-PKcs activity for efficient NHEJ DNA-DSB repair.
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Generation of a novel rodent model for DYT1 dystonia.
Neurobiol. Dis.
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A mutation in the coding region of the Tor1A gene, resulting in a deletion of a glutamic acid residue in the torsinA protein (?ETorA), is the major cause of the inherited autosomal-dominant early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1). The pathophysiological consequences of this amino acid loss are still not understood. Currently available animal models for DYT1 dystonia provided important insights into the disease; however, they differ with respect to key features of torsinA associated pathology. We developed transgenic rat models harboring the full length human mutant and wildtype Tor1A gene. A complex phenotyping approach including classical behavioral tests, electrophysiology and neuropathology revealed a progressive neurological phenotype in ?ETorA expressing rats. Furthermore, we were able to replicate key pathological features of torsinA associated pathology in a second species, such as nuclear envelope pathology, behavioral abnormalities and plasticity changes. We therefore suggest that this rat model represents an appropriate new model suitable to further investigate the pathophysiology of ?ETorA and to test for therapeutic approaches.
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Immune responses to Candida albicans in models of in vitro reconstituted human oral epithelium.
Methods Mol. Biol.
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In this protocol, we describe the application of commercially available three-dimensional organotypic tissues of human oral mucosa to study the interaction between Candida albicans and epithelial cells. Infection experiments show high reproducibility and can be used to analyse directly pathogen/epithelial cell interactions. However, the system is also very flexible. Using histological, biochemical, immunological, and molecular methods, it is possible to analyse several stages of infection by C. albicans wild type or mutant strains and demonstrate the consequence of disrupting genes encoding putative virulence factors required for host cell invasion and immune defence induction. This model provides information about host and pathogen protein and gene expression during direct interactions with each other. It can additionally be supplemented with other host factors, such as immune cells, saliva, and probiotic bacteria, which are relevant for host immune defence in the oral cavity.
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Persistence versus escape: Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus fumigatus employ different strategies during interactions with macrophages.
PLoS ONE
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Invasive bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (IBPA) is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Although Aspergillus terreus is frequently found in the environment, A. fumigatus is by far the main cause of IBPA. However, once A. terreus establishes infection in the host, disease is as fatal as A. fumigatus infections. Thus, we hypothesized that the initial steps of disease establishment might be fundamentally different between these two species. Since alveolar macrophages represent one of the first phagocytes facing inhaled conidia, we compared the interaction of A. terreus and A. fumigatus conidia with alveolar macrophages. A. terreus conidia were phagocytosed more rapidly than A. fumigatus conidia, possibly due to higher exposure of ?-1,3-glucan and galactomannan on the surface. In agreement, blocking of dectin-1 and mannose receptors significantly reduced phagocytosis of A. terreus, but had only a moderate effect on phagocytosis of A. fumigatus. Once phagocytosed, and in contrast to A. fumigatus, A. terreus did not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, but remained viable without signs of germination both in vitro and in immunocompetent mice. The inability of A. terreus to germinate and pierce macrophages resulted in significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to A. fumigatus. Blocking phagolysosome acidification by the v-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin increased A. terreus germination rates and cytotoxicity. Recombinant expression of the A. nidulans wA naphthopyrone synthase, a homologue of A. fumigatus PksP, inhibited phagolysosome acidification and resulted in increased germination, macrophage damage and virulence in corticosteroid-treated mice. In summary, we show that A. terreus and A. fumigatus have evolved significantly different strategies to survive the attack of host immune cells. While A. fumigatus prevents phagocytosis and phagolysosome acidification and escapes from macrophages by germination, A. terreus is rapidly phagocytosed, but conidia show long-term persistence in macrophages even in immunocompetent hosts.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.